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07. September 2021 · Comments Off on End of Season Potluck – Members & Guest · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

2021 End of Season Potluck

26. August 2021 · Comments Off on ID-55 at Smith Ferry Road Improvements – Update · Categories: Current Events

WATCH VIDEO 

12. August 2021 · Comments Off on NWCG Standards for Wildland Chainsaw Operations – 2021 · Categories: Current Events, Education

Download PMS 212

31. July 2021 · Comments Off on Gem County Fair · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events


As part of the deal to use the 4-H building to hold chapter meeting during the Covid-19 lockdown  Squaw Butte agreed to do a presentation at the 2021 Gem County Fair for the 4-H.  This presentation was scheduled by the fair for Saturday July 31, at 13:00 in the 4-H building.  Phil Ryan and Rob Adams agreed to do a talk on BCHAI and stock camping on Public Lands.  Both arrived at 11:00 to get the lay of the land and to make sure they were set up and ready to go at 13:00.  After wandering around for while looking for an Information booth or schedule they tried the fair office and were in luck, someone was there and said yes, we were scheduled for 13:00 at the 4-H build, but they were sorry to say they didn’t do event schedules this year an oversite and as the steer, lamb and hog sale was going on it was unlikely we would have many show up.  They were right, we had three, a couple enjoying the AC for a few minutes and a young girl who told us about her rabbit.  If interested the high steer went for 7,500, the average steer went between 5 & 6 K and prime sheep between 1,500 and 2,000.  They had not gotten to hogs before we left.

From the bidding pen to your freezer

So, to summarize: A 1200 steer, ½ inch fat, average muscling, yields a 750 pound carcass. The 750 pound carcass yields approximately:

  • 490 pounds boneless trimmed beef
  • 150 pounds fat trim
  • 110 pounds bone

A specific example of how the 490 pounds of boneless, trimmed beef could break out includes:

  • 185 pounds lean trim, or ground beef
  • 85 pounds round roasts and steaks
  • 90 pounds chuck roasts and steaks
  • 80 pounds rib and loin steaks
  • 50 pounds other cuts (brisket, flank, short ribs, skirt steak)

Maybe this helps explain how the products from a 1200 pound steer to fit in your freezer!

MINIMUM & MAXIMUM WEIGHTS FOR 4-H MARKET LAMBS FOR THE COUNTY FAIR 4-H MARKET ANIMAL SALE ARE MINIMUM: 100 MAXIMUM: 160, THESE WEIGHTS REFLECT THE STANDARDS IN TODAY’S MARKET. ANY LAMB WEIGHING OVER 160 POUNDS WILL SELL AT 160 POUNDS.

4-H’ers must own or manage their lamb at least 60 days prior to our County Fair. Lambs should weigh somewhere
around 65 – 70 pounds by June 1, in order to reach the minimum weight of 100 pounds by fair. If the lamb is wormed,
proper genetics have been followed and good feed has been given they should gain at least .6 pounds a day. A 100 pound lamb will yield around 40 pounds of meet in your freezer.

If we do this again in the future Saturday at 13:00 is not a prime time to generate interest in BCHI!

 

xxx

28. July 2021 · Comments Off on Idaho Wildlife – PRIVATE LAND CONSERVATION, PUBLIC LAND BENEFITS · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

Picture this

A cow elk gives birth to a calf in the mountains of Idaho.

The calf spends the next six months in its lush summer range before following a well-worn migratory path to a neighboring valley to spend the winter.

That critical winter habitat includes property owned by a family who manages the land to benefit their ranching operation.

The calf, a bull, returns winter after winter to that same ranch in the valley.

Years later a hunter hears the shrill bugle of a bull elk high on a mountain one September morning. Slowly the hunter inches closer. Finally within shooting range, they shoot, their arrow finding it’s target, the bull providing a year’s worth of meat to the hunter’s family.

The story of the hunter and the bull, one common across Idaho, was made possible thanks to the benefits private land provided to that animal during its lifetime.

Private lands in Idaho

Roughly 31% of the land in Idaho is privately owned. Wildlife, of course, does not adhere to the same property boundaries as humans. Migratory species especially rely on a patchwork of land ownership to survive from year to year, whether that land is someone’s private ranch, farm, or expansive BLM-managed sagebrush steppe.

So shouldn’t habitat conservation efforts be just as diverse?

This is where the US Fish and Wildlife’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program (Partners Program) comes into play.

Working alongside willing landowners and within designated priority landscapes, the Partners Program began in 2006 and has become a shining example of the possibilities for habitat conservation on private land.

“These lands have to have three foundational components to ensure they’re viable: looking through economic, ecological and social lenses”, said Jason Pyron, a wildlife biologist with USFWS who oversees Idaho’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program.

Landowners tend to focus on the economic lens, while balancing that alongside social and ecological lenses. Idaho’s hunting and fishing community will keep the ecological lens at the forefront. This overlap offers many opportunities to collaborate and provide benefits to all stakeholders.

“We have some highly migratory species in Idaho, and due to the way our landscape is dissected by private lands in valley bottoms, we are at a high risk of losing significant proportions of these populations if we don’t incentivize landowners to keep these lands open. I hope the hunting and fishing community fully appreciates what these landscapes do”, added Pyron.

Where the needs of wildlife and the needs of private landowners collide is where the Partners Program comes into play.    READ MORE

 

Posted by Dan Waugh ( tacpdan@gmail.com)

The city of Eagle is looking for inputs from trail users (Equestrians) for an ongoing project of over 1,600 acres in the northwest corner of eagle with a possibility to expand to 2,200. The city will be developing a trail system in the eagle foothills on BLM land. But, the city of eagle will run the trail system. Over 1200 citizens have been engaging so far and the city staff members are looking for more input.

Marja (360-791-1591), Arlynn (208-249-2091), and I are actively working with the project manager as the IHC Trails and Urban Spaces Committee. But, we would love to get additional views and feedback from other equestrians who will likely use this trail system. Feel free to disseminate to any and all equestrians!

PDF:  Foothills_Recreation_Plan_20_July2021_202107220914014507

Link to the Eagle Foothills Concept Plan:  New Submission (cityofeagle.org)

Leave comments at the link above!

25. April 2021 · Comments Off on SOH TV Idaho Horse Expo Highlights 2021 Show · Categories: Current Events, Education

Dan doing a packing clinic at the 2021 Horse Expo on Horse TV

24. March 2021 · Comments Off on Bird Feeders & suspected outbreak of salmonellosis · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

Area bird lovers asked to temporarily remove and clean bird feeders due to a suspected outbreak of salmonellosis

Thursday, March 11, 2021 – 3:47 PM MST

Wild birds that frequent feeders in the winter can be especially susceptible to disease outbreaks of salmonellosis, due to the large numbers of birds coming to feeders.

Outbreaks associated with bird feeders may cause high mortality across large geographic areas. Currently, this outbreak is affecting wild birds in Idaho, Oregon, California, Washington, and even into British Columbia, Canada.

In an effort to reduce the potential transmission of salmonellosis locally, Idaho Fish and Game recommends that those who have bird feeders in their yards temporarily discontinue all feeding of wild birds for at least a few weeks.
“Although stopping feeding may seem like it will harm birds, in reality, they use feeders as just one source of food and will quickly disperse to find other food sources and in so doing, reduce transmission of this disease at feeding sites,” says Idaho Fish and Game’s Regional Diversity Biologist Tempe Regan.

Even in years where disease outbreaks don’t occur, regular deep-cleaning of bird feeders is important to minimize any kind of disease spread.

“If you enjoy feeding birds, sanitation is critical and it is your responsibility to ensure your feeders are not facilitating disease transmission,” Regan says.

While bird feeders should always be cleaned on a regular basis with warm soapy water, a more rigorous cleaning is required during suspected outbreaks of salmonellosis.

Feeders should be cleaned with a 1 to 10 ratio of household bleach to water. After soaking in the bleach solution, feeders should be rinsed and dried before refilling with seed. Cleaning the area around and under feeders regularly by raking up discarded shells and droppings is also encouraged.

All birds that frequent bird feeders can be susceptible to salmonellosis, which is transmitted through the droppings and saliva of sick birds. Birds infected with salmonellosis can exhibit symptoms such as ruffled feathers, lethargy and diarrhea, and can appear very emaciated. Eventually, infected individuals will succumb to the disease and you may notice dead birds at or under feeders or under trees nearby.

“These disease outbreaks occur every few years, and 2021 just happens to be one of those years,” Regan says. “Salmonella exists at some baseline in the wild populations and when conditions are just right, the disease will flare up.”

This year in the Northwest, large flocks of Cassin’s Finches, Grosbeak species, Common Redpolls, American and Lesser Goldfinches, Pine Siskins and other members of the finch family, are wintering at lower, more southerly elevations and are frequenting backyard feeders. According to Regan, with this large influx of finches, a bird group notably susceptible to Salmonella, it is fairly natural that this outbreak would occur.

“And using bird feeders, while not directly causing the disease, can facilitate the spread,” Regan says.

Although uncommon, salmonella bacteria can be transmitted to humans through direct contact of sick birds or droppings. To avoid transmission to humans, people should take precautions when handling sick or dead wild birds, and when cleaning bird feeders or bird baths by wearing gloves and thoroughly washing their hands. Additionally, pet owners, especially those with cats, are encouraged to keep them inside to ensure they do not catch or consume sick birds.

For more information, contact the Salmon Fish and Game regional office at 208-756-2271.

08. February 2021 · Comments Off on GOP congressman pitches $34 billion plan to breach Lower Snake River dams in new vision for Northwest · Categories: Current Events

Such a colossal proposal coming from a relatively unknown Republican is a shocker and the delegation is already giving it a look.

All four Democratic senators from Washington and Oregon issued a joint release Friday evening stating: “All communities in the Columbia River Basin and beyond should be heard in efforts to recover the Northwest’s iconic salmon runs while ensuring economic vitality of the region. Any process needs to balance the needs of communities in the Columbia River Basin, be transparent, be driven by stakeholders and follow the science.”

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Spokane, put out a statement in staunch opposition. “These dams are the beating heart of Eastern Washington,” she said in a press release. “Spending $33 billion to breach them — with no guarantee that doing so will restore salmon populations — is a drastic, fiscally irresponsible leap to take.” Washington’s three GOP House members also joined with a representative from Idaho on a proposed resolution supporting existing hydropower dams, and seeking expansion of hydropower in the region.

But Simpson has captured the ear of others who normally would pile on. Instead, they are listening, with caveats and caution, to be sure.

Simpson is careful to point out that what he has released is an overall concept that provides only broad spending targets for key initiatives. What he wants is a regional conversation about a new vision for the Northwest. What if we stopped debating whether the Lower Snake River dams are valuable, and recognize that they are, then figure out together how to replace those benefits?

READ MORE & WATCH VIDEO

Idaho Wildlife ORG
February 7, 2021

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Brian Brooks, Executive Director, 208.870.7967 – bbrooks@idahowildlife.org

This weekend Idaho Congressman Mike Simpson released a preliminary proposal to restore Idaho’s salmon and steelhead by breaching the lower Snake River dams and investing in new power generation and transportation infrastructure, among many other things. The Idaho Wildlife Federation (IWF) applauds the legislative package and the Congressman’s clear commitment to seeing the restoration of the region’s salmon and steelhead while ensuring the well-being of all stakeholders between Idaho, Oregon, and Washington.

“This is the first meaningful approach any elected official has made public that recognizes the only way to recover Idaho’s salmon and steelhead to meaningful abundance is to untangle the gargantuan and crippling bureaucratic knot that is now also failing ratepayers and taxpayers,” said IWF’s executive director Brian Brooks. “The scope of this proposal will be a massive and decades long – possibly perpetual – shot in the arm for the economies of North Idaho, and Eastern Washington and Oregon.”

What was once a profitable system even 20 years ago is now on course for unending and ever-increasing costs on three fronts. First, the free market is moving away from lower Snake River shipping – down almost 80% from it’s peak – which means taxpayers now shoulder the ever-growing loss of revenue to upkeep the aging dams. Second, BPA – a federal agency – charges $36 per megawatt hour while their competitors charge $22, and is so far in irreversible debt ($15 billion and counting) the former administrator called their situation a ‘bloodbath’. This is the same entity on the hook for funding fish recovery ($17 billion spent so far to no avail). Third, Idaho’s fish are careening toward extinction and after 50 years of trying to reverse the trendline, we are redlining.

Within the legislative package are detailed investments of a modernized rail system for grain growers, economic development plans for communities along the river, irrigation options, investments in modular nuclear power and new transmission lines, a path forward for measurable recovery of Idaho’s anadromous salmon and steelhead, which includes removing recovery oversight from BPA. And much more.

Only the earthen portions of the dams will be removed, leaving in place the concrete infrastructure if one day it is decided to turn the dams back on.

“Idahoans, no matter their background, will benefit from increased salmon and steelhead in our state’s rivers. From the small business owner in Clearwater County to the outfitter in the upper Salmon. Not only will Lewiston become the inland fishing capital of the northwest, it will be a hub of major economic activity with the investments this proposal makes. Its a game changer,” Brooks added.

“This is a only a proposal at this point, but my hope is that Idahoans come together and understand the way we do things now is leaving many of our friends and family behind. Let’s pick a new future – a new system – that works for all of us. I’m hopeful.”

Follow this link to view the Congressman’s proposal.

21. December 2020 · Comments Off on Malheur Economic Recovery and Owyhee Protection Bill · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

17. December 2020 · Comments Off on ITA – Membership & New Equipment Drive · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events


As part of our membership drive, we are bringing you weekly updates about some of the programs your donations are helping to make happen!
These tools are OLD!
Since our humble beginnings in 2010, ITA volunteers have spent a decade maintaining hundreds of miles of non-motorized trail in Idaho. This means that our trail work tools have spent 10 years in the field cutting brush, digging tread, mining rock, and sawing logs. Every season our tools travel across the state, from project to project, enabling our volunteers in their stewardship of Idaho’s hiking trails. The current ITA cache is a hodgepodge of Forest Service hand-me-downs, donations from our Board and members, and additional tools paid for by supplemental grants.

These tools have served us well! Our tools traverse the ridges of the Frank Church Wilderness, summit the Sawtooth peaks, boat the wild Salmon and Snake rivers. They brave the snow and sizzle in the heat of summer. Hundreds of volunteers have taken their first Pulaski swing with an ITA tool. Our seasoned equipment has gotten crew after crew of like-minded Idahoans out in the woods to enjoy the best of what Idaho has to offer.

As ITA has continued its steady growth, our tools have been tasked with more and more. They’ve been spread thin. They’ve grown tired. There have been casualties. Every season a few of our hard-working tools succumb to the abuse they receive in their mission to keep Idaho’s trails open. Wobbly shovel heads and wonky pulaskis become the norm when tools are pushed to their breaking point. 2021 will see a continued expansion of our trail program and an increased demand on our tool cache.

With the addition of six week-long youth projects and two Women Only Week-longs, ITA will have more projects running concurrently than ever before. That’s why we are seeking to raise an additional $2,500 this year to fully outfit a 12-person crew with new tools. These tools will ensure that every volunteer that wants to help maintain Idaho’s trails has access to the tools to do so. This cache will allow us to retire some of our older tools that have served many seasons beyond their prime and help us avoid excessive tool-trailer shuttling. These tools will set up ITA for success in 2021!

Will you join us in supporting Idaho’s trails by becoming a member and helping us purchase the tools we need for a strong 2021 season? JOIN or RENEW your Membership

 

16. December 2020 · Comments Off on Idaho Rangeland – Fall Newsletter · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

READ NEWSLETTER

WATCH VIDEO

15. December 2020 · Comments Off on 2020 was a successful trail work season on the Salmon-Challis! · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Schade, Nicholas E -FS <nicholas.schade@usda.gov>

Hello – On behalf of the Salmon-Challis and our trails staff, I wanted to extend a sincere thank you to all of our partners and volunteers who helped ensure that 2020 was a successful trail work season on the Salmon-Challis! In spite of the challenges that 2020 presented us all, collectively we were able to increase the trail miles maintained on the Salmon-Challis as compared to the past several years. We were able to maintain 1,181 miles in 2020. This is in large part to work completed, organized, and championed by our partners and volunteers. As many of you know, we received a few substantial grants and earmarks from the State of Idaho and the Forest Service Washington and Regional offices in the last few years to help us maintain our trails infrastructure. In many cases your support helped secure this funding for the Salmon-Challis and for you, our partners, to complete this important trails maintenance. With the Great American Outdoors Act being past this year, the Trails Stewardship Act (2016) and other recent attention on improving trail conditions, we will continue to need your support and assistance to help solve our trails issues. Thanks again for all of your help and we look forward to working with you as we head into 2021 and beyond.

Please feel free to share with others who I may have missed.

Best,
Nick Schade

https://groups.google.com/g/salmon-area-trails-group/c/rD6J3jODmQs/m/CSB5xnP9AQAJ?pli=1

14. December 2020 · Comments Off on NWSA and other Conservation Groups Fight against Mountain Bikes in Wilderness · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

A Senate Bill (S. 1695) by Senator Mike Lee, Utah which would allow mountain bikes in designated wilderness was given a hearing in early December.  NWSA and other groups wrote opposing this and other measures which would weaken wilderness protections.  Read more….

A coalition of groups is pushing to stop legislation in the U.S. Senate that would open wilderness areas to mountain bike use.

The coalition, which includes the American Hiking Society, Appalachian Trails Conservancy, National Wilderness Stewardship Alliance, and Pacific Crest Trail Association, maintains that there are enough trails open to mountain bikers without the need to allow them access to official wilderness.

“We strongly oppose S. 1695, and encourage subcommittee members to oppose this legislation as well,” the group said in a letter to U.S. Sens. Mike Lee, R-Utah, and Ron Wyden, D-Oregon, of the Senate Subcommittee on Public Lands, Forests and Mining, which has been considering the measure. “S. 1695 seeks to open federal wilderness areas to mountain biking, a clear violation of the 1964 Wilderness Act, the nation’s seminal conservation law. Most importantly, S. 1695 would threaten the character of the entire National Wilderness Preservation System by undermining our nation’s bedrock landscape conservation tool.”

Introduced by Lee in 2019, the Human-Powered Travel in Wilderness Areas Act would redefine “human travel” in official wilderness as that which does not involve a “propulsive internal or external motor with a nonliving power source.” When Lee introduced the measure, he said the access was needed to “enrich Americans’ enjoyment of the outdoors by expanding recreational opportunities in wilderness areas.”

Under the legislation, federal land managers — including the National Park Service — would be given the authority to decide whether to allow and how to regulate non-motorized travel in wilderness areas within their jurisdictions.

The Wilderness Act of 1964 prohibits the use of motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, and other forms of mechanical transport in officially designated wilderness.

In arguing againt the bill, the groups said the Wilderness Act “is more relevant today than ever before.”

“Our nation’s wilderness areas include only 5 percent of our nation’s public lands. In the lower 48 states, it’s merely 3 percent,” they noted. “The remaining 97 percent is open to motorized and mechanized recreation. Designated wilderness areas have a fundamentally different purpose than providing for motorized and mechanized access. In fact, that is the very purpose of the Wilderness Act – to provide for a few remote, pristine areas where nature prevails.”

They also pointed out that “(T)here remains a nearly inexhaustible supply of non-wilderness federal lands that are open to mountain biking and where additional mountain bike trails and opportunities continue to be created. In the last decade, new mountain biking trails have been developed at a historically rapid rate.”  READ MORE

30. November 2020 · Comments Off on Flying low for salmon · Categories: Current Events


By Jerry Painter – The Post Register

Each year in late summer/early fall, chinook salmon travel more than 800 miles back from the ocean to scoop out gravel nests in the small streams of the central Idaho wilderness and deposit their eggs.

Idaho Fish and Game biologists are literally hovering over the streams and taking notes.

Fish and Game recently completed its 460-mile aerial helicopter survey of chinook salmon redds in the Frank Church – River of No Return Wilderness along the Middle Fork of the Salmon River and its tributaries. For five straight days, biologists flew at tree-top height above streams to count redds. What they found was encouraging.

Biologists counted 467 nests, better than last year’s 161.

“It’s a definite improvement over last year,” said fisheries biologist Conor McClure who participated in the count. “Still below the (average) of the past 25 years. That’s kind of the way it goes. You have peaks and valleys. It was up this year, and we hope it will continue.”

Redd numbers have peaked at more than 2,000 back in 2003. The past four years have seen counts plummet to a few hundred or less. Last year’s count of 161 was one of the lowest since the surveys began. Fish and Game said information collected during the surveys helps make predictions about future returns, monitor trends over time, and guide management decisions.

McClure said recent alarms of plunging salmon numbers have Idaho Fish and Game working to improve habitat to help chinook produce more fish.

“One thing I can say that we are doing here and have been doing for a long time is habitat improvement,” he said. “There has been some research that has indicated that one thing that could benefit the population that we can control on our end is natal habitat for juvenile chinook.”

McClure said projects to improve nursery streams for fish are underway in the Lemhi, North Fork of the Salmon and Pahsimeroi rivers and tributaries.

“There are a lot of factors that affect (salmon),” he said. “Commercial fishing, dams in terms of out-migrating and return has an influence, ocean conditions, recreational fishing, predation, things that can and do affect them. On our end our big thing is restoring habitat.”

Salmon deposit 4,000 to 15,000 eggs in each redd, but after hatching and traveling to the ocean and back through a gauntlet of hazards, “only a handful return from each redd,” McClure said.

“It’s a numbers game for fish,” he said. “That’s how they do it. Instead of having one young to nurture to the ocean and back, they throw out a bunch of eggs so that some will make it back. In terms of biology, if they are at least replacing themselves, then it works. If they do better than that, the population grows.”

29. November 2020 · Comments Off on 2021 Idaho Trails Supporter · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events


LINK TO IDPR STICKERS

21. November 2020 · Comments Off on USDA Forest Service Invites Public Feedback on Proposed List of Deferred Maintenance Projects for Fiscal Year 2022 · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Great American Outdoors Act Virtual Sensing Opportunity

The USDA Forest Service is moving forward with implementation of the Great American Outdoors Act, which will enable federal land managers to take aggressive steps to address deferred maintenance and other infrastructure projects on national forests and grasslands through 2025.

The Forest Service will use these funds to maximize the benefits experienced by millions of Americans who visit and use their national forests. Projects funded by this act will focus on improving conditions on forest and rangelands, reducing wildfire risk, and increasing the resiliency of our nation’s forests for present and future generations.

 

The Forest Service is inviting the public to provide feedback on the projects that are under consideration to be prioritized for funding in Fiscal Year 2022. This opportunity is intended to serve only as a virtual listening session via solicitation of public feedback. Feedback provided will become part of the project record. A response to the feedback submitted during this opportunity will not be provided. Projects selected for funding will be compliant with the National Environmental Policy Act. Public notification and engagement on the selected projects will occur as required by regulation.

The following is a list of proposed projects for the Intermountain Region.  Your feedback is requested by Nov. 30, 2020.

List of Region 4 Projects

Please note that this project list includes projects submitted for funding consideration under the agency’s National Asset Management Program, which includes funding available under the Capital Improvement and Maintenance and Federal Land Transportation Program.

The public has until Nov. 30, 2020 to review and provide feedback on the proposed list. For more details on how to submit your feedback, visit: https://cara.ecosystem-management.org/Public/CommentInput?project=NP-2648.

News Release: USDA Forest Service Invites Public Feedback on Proposed List of Deferred Maintenance Projects for Fiscal Year 2022

SEE COMPLETE LIST


COMMENT ON PROJECTS

10. November 2020 · Comments Off on Wilderness News – November 2020 · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

WATCH VIDEO
The Pacific Southwest Region’s Pack Stock Center of Excellence is an innovative program that honors Forest Service tradition while addressing current and future needs. This 12-minute video shows how horses and mules have been used in the agency since its inception. With the passage of the 1964 Wilderness Act, which generally prohibits motorized equipment and mechanized transport in these areas, packing has become the key method of transportation for both people and supplies into the backcountry for increasingly important work.

READ MORE

06. November 2020 · Comments Off on 2020 Holiday Food Drive – Squaw Butte · Categories: Current Events


2020 Chapter Food Drive

25. September 2020 · Comments Off on National Forest System Trails Stewardship Act – Priority Areas · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands


Priority Areas

Please check back for additional information and updates on each priority area.

  1. Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex & Adjacent Lands
  2. Methow Valley Ranger District
  3. Hells Canyon National Recreation Area/Eagle Cap Wilderness
  4. Central Idaho Complex
  5. Continental Divide National Scenic Trail
  6. Wyoming “Forest Gateway Communities”
  7. Northern California Wilderness Areas: Marble Mountain & Trinity Alps
  8. Angeles National Forest
  9. Greater Prescott Trail System
  10. Sedona Red Rock Ranger District Trail System
  11. Colorado Fourteeners
  12. Superior National Forest Trails
  13. White Mountain National Forest Partner Complex: “200 Years of Community Trail Stewardship”
  14. Southern Appalachians Capacity Enhancement Model
  15. Iditarod National Historic Trail “Southern Trek”
25. September 2020 · Comments Off on USFS to announce e-Bike guidance – Comment Period · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Current Events, Public Lands

LINK TO FORM                         LINK TO READING ROOM

FSM 7710 Summary for Comment.pdf

FSM 7700 Summary for Comment.pdf

FSM 7700 Zero Code Definitions to CARA.pdf

FSM 7710 Travel Planning to CARA.pdf

11. September 2020 · Comments Off on Vote Public Lands · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

Today we’re relaunching #VotePublicLands, American Hiking’s nonpartisan voter education and engagement effort.

2020 has been a big year for public lands, and we’ve seen that when the hiking community uses its collective voice we can advance public land priorities. We worked hard for the Great American Outdoors Act to become law with overwhelming bipartisan support, but the work doesn’t stop there. We as hikers need to work towards equitable access to the outdoors for all.

One of the most important ways to make our voices heard is to VOTE. Through #VotePublicLands, American Hiking provides our members and supporters easy to use resources to register to vote, check registration status, and request an absentee ballot/vote by mail.

Explore the key issues to be strong public lands advocates
10. August 2020 · Comments Off on Procedures for Volunteers – Covid-19 Guidlines · Categories: Current Events


VIEW DOCUMENT

09. August 2020 · Comments Off on Cowboy Campground, Idaho City is looking for a Host · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

Update – August 23, 2020 Cowboy Campground has found a host. She will be starting on Wednesday.
Thanks Arlynn

Hi, All –

If you have been in touch with Sabrina recently she may have mentioned to you that we would like to have a camp host up at the campground.  We would like to start our search with the local Backcountry Horsemen chapters, as we feel this would be a great pond to fish in for folks who are competent and trustworthy.  If we don’t find them within your chapters then we will expand our search to other chapters and a few other organizations, such as Facebook groups and maybe the Forest Service.

We have developed the attached flyer for our search.  Would you all be so kind as to send it out to your chapters?

Also, I want to be clear as to which chapter you’re each a part of, so can you reply and let me know, please?

If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact me via Email or my cell at 208-629-9270.

Thanks – Diane Carty  horsey4life@msn.com   

07. July 2020 · Comments Off on Idaho Wildlife Federation – July News Update · Categories: Current Events

LINK TO NEWS

 

30. June 2020 · Comments Off on Trail between Stanley and Redfish Lake is in the right place · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

In March 2019, I retired after a 30-year career as a backcountry recreation manager for the Sawtooth National Recreation Area. In that position, I helped design and lay out many trails including, as my last major trails project, the Galena Summer Trails Network at Galena Lodge.

Based on that experience, I can guarantee that no competent trails designer and few incompetent ones would even consider the trail location along State Highway 75 proposed by Mr. David Boren in the June 14 article in the Idaho Statesman.

In 2005, the Sawtooth National Recreation Area purchased a trail easement across private land now owned by Mr. Boren in the location determined to provide the best recreation opportunity, emphasizing the world-class views of the Sawtooths and ease of trail construction. The trail on the easement is vastly preferable for recreationists who can enjoy the views of the Sawtooths for the entire length of this section of the trail rather than just a short portion of the Boren proposal.

The recreation opportunity provided by the highway trail would not even resemble a desirable experience, and construction of a trail on the extremely steep loose slopes above the highway is impractical in the extreme. The problems with the highway trail, for both construction and experiential reasons are too numerous to mention in the space I have here, but I would eagerly walk both routes with anyone who would like to discuss them.

As to the easement trail’s effects on sandhill crane nesting, the bench is not nesting habitat. Sandhill cranes prefer to nest in riparian areas, not open sagebrush areas. And while elk do use the bench, they are active in the early morning and late evening when use of the trail would be minimal.

The idea that Mr. Boren is concerned about the view of the Sawtooths is a bit confusing, considering that he is building a monster house directly front and center of that view. The few people who get married at the Sawtooth Meditation Chapel and would see the trail, as pointed out by Mr. Boren, pales in comparison to the hundreds of thousands who will have their view marred by his mansion. And I will point out that the land in the foreground of the chapel slopes away from the building and recedes from view quite quickly. And if Mr. Boren does really care about the view, how hard did he try to convince his brother to not build his own mansion, again, front and center of the view of the Sawtooths?

Mr. Boren’s excitement for the view of the Sawtooths that he felt as a child is exactly why the Forest Service is building the trail on the easement, not along the highway. I believe in the power of landscape to inspire people. To spend time immersed in awe can be transformative. I experienced it and over the course of my career in the Sawtooths I had contact with many many others who did, as well. That opportunity for awe is ever-present on the easement trail and is woefully absent from the highway trail.

There is wealth in this landscape. Not wealth that can be measured in dollars and cents, but wealth that fills people’s souls and moves them to greater heights. Science increasingly documents this, and the easement trail provides it; the highway trail decidedly does not. The American people paid for the right to build this trail where it provides the most benefit. Let’s not allow the wealth of “a Boise tech company success story” to deny them that.

Ed Cannady retired last year after working for the U.S. Forest Service for 30 years, many of them as backcountry manager for the Sawtooth National Recreation Area.
03. May 2020 · Comments Off on Interactive BNF Closures Map · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

For the latest Boise National Forest updates visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/boise/home

For all Boise NF closure information visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

Boise National Forest interactive closure story map: https://usfs.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=1b9f2d8115374ad3a943d95decd3835d

National Forests in Idaho closure story map: https://usfs.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=d0588d7e48ee430da80c5ad88c48b43d

03. May 2020 · Comments Off on USDA Forest Service Intermountain Region welcomes acting regional forester · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

Intermountain Region Acting Regional Forester news release 4.20.2020

30. April 2020 · Comments Off on Idaho forests extend campground and hot springs closures, cancel rafting reservations · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

April 29. 2020

As Idaho prepares to reopen some businesses and lift its coronavirus-related stay-home order, some federal agencies are tightening or extending restrictions related to the pandemic.

In a news release on Tuesday, the U.S. Forest Service announced it would extend some closures in the Salmon-Challis National Forest and cancel permits to float the Salmon River and Middle Fork of the Salmon through mid-May. Any “developed recreation sites” including campsites and day-use sites are closed through May 15, while “Forest Trail #6232, the Warm Springs Trail and the area within 250 yards from the center of Gold Bug Hot Springs” will be closed through the end of May.

Officials said anyone with a float permit will receive an email notification that their permit has been canceled, as well as a refund of any fees. Permits are required year-round to float the Salmon River and Middle Fork of the Salmon, though the primary float season is from June to September.

Forest Service officials said the continued closures are meant to prevent the spread of coronavirus and the disease it causes, COVID-19.

“We have visitors that want to enjoy the forest but many areas are drawing more people than social distancing guidelines recommend,” said Chuck Mark, Salmon-Challis National Forest supervisor, in the news release. “As spring progresses, many of these recreation sites are beginning to become accessible. We will continue to monitor the situation closely. The forest is developing a plan to phase reopening some sites when conditions allow.”

Similarly, the Boise National Forest announced on Friday that it would extend closures at campgrounds, hot springs and trailheads through June 30 due to the pandemic. The agency had previously announced that many popular campgrounds near Boise, including Cottonwood, Sage Hen and Peace Valley, would be closed through the end of June; however, its early April closure of hot springs had no initial expiration date.

A list of all affected Boise National Forest sites can be found online at fs.usda.gov.

Also on Tuesday, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced restrictions at Lucky Peak Dam. The Corps said, until further notice, fires and camping are prohibited and boats are required to be docked at a marina or out of the water between sunset and sunrise. According to the Corps’ news release, the restrictions were “made in response to public safety and resource protection concerns,” though it’s not clear if they are related to coronavirus. The Statesman has reached out to the Corps for more information.

BNF-Closed PDF              04-03-2020 Idaho COVID Group Limits of 10 order SIGNED

28. March 2020 · Comments Off on COVID-19 Update (BLM & USFS) · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

VISIT WEB SITE

PDF:COVID-19 USFS 2020-03-28       VISIT WEB SITE

VISIT WEB SITE

13. March 2020 · Comments Off on American Trails – Postings March 2020 · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Read More

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26. February 2020 · Comments Off on Tawnya Brummett selected as Forest Supervisor for Boise National Forest · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

19. February 2020 · Comments Off on HR 5797- Immediate Action Needed by All Trail Enthusiasts! · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

READ MORE

15. February 2020 · Comments Off on Field Notes 02/14/2020 – National Wilderness Stewardship Alliance · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Hike the Hill

This week was the annual gathering of the national scenic and historic trail community in DC to educate Congress, meet with agencies, and build support for trails.  NWSA was there along with Back Country Horsemen and other Wilderness groups to lend our voice and to expand opportunities for wilderness stewardship.

We are happy to report that the Forest Service Chief took this opportunity to express her full support for Shared Stewardship and to renew the NFS Trail Stewardship Partner funding for $200,000 in 2020.  Find more details here.

This is in addition to the $200,000 already secured for Wilderness Stewardship Performance activities.

Applications for both programs are due by March 30th.

Webinars

Tuesday, March 10 at 1:00 PM Mountain

Leave No Trace  — Refresher, Updates, Resources

Erin Collier, Brice Esplin, and Faith Overall

What’s new with Leave No Trace, and how can you incorporate the principles into your daily work?  Erin Collier & Brice Esplin, Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers, will provide a general Leave No Trace refresher with an emphasis on updates, research, and resources, geared toward wilderness stewardship groups and agency partners. Faith Overall, Leave No Trace’s Education and Outreach coordinator and volunteer for the Indian Peaks Wilderness Alliance will also join to provide a volunteer perspective and answer questions on getting more involved.

Register Here

Wilderness Workshop Presentations and Videos

Many presentations at the Workshop are posted on the WORKSHOP PAGE .  You can also find the Program and Abstracts.  Several of the main sessions were video taped and as soon as they are available will be placed on this page as well.  The Final Plenary session and Derick Lugo’s Closing Presentation are now available online.

The 2020 Funding Program Application Periods are Open

As noted above NWSA has two funding programs for wilderness stewards.

The Wilderness Stewardship Performance Partner Funding and

The National Forest System Trail Stewardship Partner Funding.

Both application periods will end March 30, 2020.

Now is the time to renew your memberships for 2020.  WSP Funding requires a NWSA membership in order to apply.

Renew NOW

In other Member News:  Memberships will now track calendar years.  Memberships renewals for 2020 began October 1st and are good for the entire calendar year 2020.  Participate in Funding programs, get discounts to the National Wilderness Workshop and keep informed about national issues affecting wilderness stewardship.

Forest Service WSP Webinars now Posted

The latest WSP webinars are posted on Wilderness Connect.  The webinars include the Plants element and Recreation Sites element.

These webinars can be found at the link below, along with the nine other WSP elements already posted and of course the other outstanding past and planned webinars by the Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center, Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, and other great partners.

https://wilderness.net/practitioners/training/free-webinars/default.php

TAKE ACTION: SUPPORT PUBLIC LAND ACCESS NOW!

The time is here to add your voice in support of public access. The Public Access Protection Act (PAPA) was assigned a bill number and awaits introduction. Now, Senate leadership decides whether to allow the bill an introduction, opening the bill for public support or criticism.

If you support protecting public access, Senators Winder, Vick, Hill, and Heider need to hear from you- that you support PAPA and want a public introduction of S1317 in the Senate Resources Committee by February 26th. Enter your name on the form below to ask our state leadership to protect access to your public lands.

08. February 2020 · Comments Off on Idaho parks department eyes voluntary trail pass program. · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Idaho Trails Supporter Fact Sheet

Hey Folks – I have attached the fact sheet for our voluntary sticker program. The short – The voluntary sticker (or pass) is a $10 minimum donation available to the public on June 6th, National trails day. They will be primarily available online.

Thanks!

Tom Helmer
Non-Motorized Trails Program Manager
5657 Warm Springs Ave|Boise, ID 83716
tel (208) 514-2419 | mobile (208) 914-4821

**************************************************************************************
February 07, 2020
BOISE, Idaho

The director of the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation said Friday that his agency is starting a voluntary trail pass program as part of a long-range goal to raise awareness and eventually money for non-motorized trail maintenance.

David Langhorst told the Legislature’s budget-setting committee that interest in the 900-mile (1,450-kilometer) Idaho Centennial Trail has been growing.

He said motorized trail groups have been effective in persuading lawmakers to tax or place fees on those user groups for trail maintenance.

But he said non-motorized trail users have been somewhat resistant to those kinds of user fees. He said the voluntary trail pass could help change minds.

Read more here: https://www.sacbee.com/news/business/article240081138.html#storylink=cpy
17. January 2020 · Comments Off on Speak Up for Salmon · Categories: Current Events

If you’ve been looking for an opportunity to speak up for salmon, steelhead, and Idaho’s river communities, here’s an excellent opportunity!

This Friday, January 17th, the Governor’s Salmon Workgroup will hold a public comment period from 5-7pm in the Lincoln Auditorium at the State House in Boise: 700 W Jefferson St. Anyone is welcome to sit in on the meeting or sign up to give public testimony, and each individual will be allotted 3 minutes. We hope to see you there!

On Saturday, the group will meet at the University of Idaho Boise Water Center to conduct a group meeting amongst Workgroup members. The public is also invited to sit in on this meeting.

As a reminder, IWF is a member of the Workgroup and sits alongside a diverse group of stakeholders that represent varying interests throughout Idaho and the region.

You can find the full meeting agenda for both days here.

14. January 2020 · Comments Off on Wild Spotter – Mapping Invasive Species · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands


You can help fight back against invasive species in America’s wild places by downloading the FREE Wild Spotter Mobile App on your smartphone or other mobile device. You’ll learn how to identify, map, and prevent the spread of these invaders in order to protect our rivers, mountains, forests, and all wild places for future generations. Learn more by watching the Wild Spotter Introduction Video.

Volunteers are a vital part of the Wild Spotter campaign! To become a volunteer, register either online or download the FREE Wild Spotter Mobile App on your smartphone or other mobile device. Once registered, reach out to your nearest National Forest or Grassland to discover how you can volunteer to help support and protect these beautiful places from invasive species. Then, just get outside and enjoy America’s wild places while keeping an eye out for those harmful invaders!  https://wildspotter.org/

06. January 2020 · Comments Off on SRA – IDPR Grants for 2021- Need support · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands, Work Parties and Projects

January 6, 2020

By Kent May – Trails Supervisor Sawtooth National Recreation Area

For 2021 RTP we are replacing two log boardwalks/puncheon, and removing two others on the Livingston Mill trail (pics attached). The two that are removed, will have the stream crossing hardened with rock to prevent erosion. On top of the infrastructure work, we will be doing 90 miles of heavy maintenance to trails in and accessing the White Clouds Wilderness.

  

Replace these

   

Remove these and harden trail

For 2021 ORMV we are building 25’ of puncheon over a perennial stream on Grand Prize motorized single track trail (pic attached). For this grant there will also be a maintenance component of 100 miles of heavy maintenance to motorized trails, paying special attention to the Grand Prize trail to prevent any motorized encroachment into the Boulder Wilderness.

We are looking for support letters for our 2021 IDPR Grants

31. December 2019 · Comments Off on BCHI State Board Meeting & Convention · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Current Events

Treasure Valley Chapter – Facebook Page

Information PDF

New Year Greetings to Squaw Butte BCHI Members,

The 2020 BOD Meeting and Convention information and registration form is on the BCHI website on the Activities’ page http://www.bchi.org/activities.htm. Please open it and read through it. There are substantial savings for registering early, rather than later, because we want members who have never attended to join us for the convention: $70 for person and only $120 per couple. Early registrations will be postmarked before March 1st. We are also offering substantial discounts for young attendees, whether members or not, at only $20 per ticket for the dinner/convention. And, we are selling dinner tickets for adults who wish to attend the social hour, dinner, and live auction, only, at $25.

All delegates must pay the full convention registration fee if they are voting delegates, and all BCHI members who attend the convention for the day, regardless if they vote, must pay the full–$70 single, $120 couple (early fees) or $85 per person (after Feb. 29)–registration fee.

We have placed the option of paying only $25 for dinner as a courtesy in the case someone’s travel partner or friend wants to attend dinner. A $25 dinner ticket holder will be allowed in the building at 5:00pm.
We have different fees to allow for flexibility, in the hope that more members will attend. We want all to take advantage of the savings without taking advantage of us and the costs of putting on the convention. (And, though not explained in the website info, part of the fees go to pay for Friday’s meetings.

We have placed a little information about motels and eateries on the site as well. Please note that to get a room at the Best Western Plus Peppertree across the parking lot from the Nampa Civic Center, the venue for the convention, you must click into the Best Western Motel Reservation URL, Best Western Motel Reservation URL ; scroll down to see Backcountry Horsemen discount prices. I believe that the Best Western would only reserve 20 rooms for this function, so log in early. For those who cannot use a computer, we are reserved under Backcountry Horsemen under Group ID #Z81XT6F7.

Please take the time to read through the information on the BCHI website, which may change, slightly, as we near the events. We have three great presentations on Saturday from Madison Seamons (stock care–very entertaining), Cheryl Bice (emergency care), and Alayne Blickel (managing your horse pasture/corral areas)…so get on board and get your registrations in early.

Alice Millington
Treasure Valley BCHI President
McCall, ID
millington0606@gmail.com
208-475-4107

13. December 2019 · Comments Off on Idaho Rangeland Resources Commission · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Idaho Rangeland Resources Commission 
2019-IRRC-Annual-Report

06. December 2019 · Comments Off on Recovering America’s Wildlife Act · Categories: Current Events

Tomorrow, the House Natural Resources Committee will vote on a piece of critically important legislation for wildlife, the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, and we need your help in asking Idaho Congressman Russ Fulcher to vote “yes”!

Idaho houses some of the most iconic wildlife in the nation including bighorn sheep, mountain goats, and anadromous salmon and steelhead. But those species, and hundreds more in Idaho, are at risk. The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act would provide $1.4 billion annually to state and tribal wildlife agencies across the nation. The money would aid local, on-the-ground work benefitting hunters and anglers and anyone who appreciates Idaho’s diverse and iconic wildlife species.

Please join us in asking Representative Fulcher to stand up for Idaho’s sportsmen and women through his support of this monumental legislation.

Follow THIS LINK to email Congressman Fulcher.

01. December 2019 · Comments Off on E-Bikes welcome on ‘motorized use’ Forest Service trails, roads · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

24. November 2019 · Comments Off on Squaw Butte Annual Food & Funds drive for People & Pets · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

It is that holiday time of year when the generous members of Back Country Horsemen – Squaw Butte Chapter donate food, funds and pet supplies to local organization in Gem county.

Food & Funds will be collected at the December monthly chapter meeting Thursday December 5th, and at the Holiday Pot-Luck Saturday December 7th.

2019 Food-Pet Drive Information

03. October 2019 · Comments Off on Idaho Wildlife Federation – Public Lands Blog · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

LINK TO BLOG

22. September 2019 · Comments Off on Katie Wood, new Emmett District Ranger · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

Boise, Idaho, September 16, 2019—The Boise National Forest welcomes Katie Wood, as the new District Ranger in Emmett.

Katie served as the Boise District, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Support Services and Operations Chief since February 2017. She has overseen a wide diversity of areas including: emergency stabilization and rehabilitation, engineering, heavy equipment, GIS, administration and noxious and invasive weeds.

“I look forward to working in cooperation with the public while serving in this role. My goal is to ensure the Emmett Ranger District is managed in a way that takes into account the needs of current users without losing sight that future generations will need, and rely on, public lands as much as we do. This is particularly relevant given the Emmett Ranger District’s proximity to Idaho’s largest population center and the mixed uses which occur on this land.” Said Katie Wood, Emmett District Ranger.

Her tenure as Challis-Yankee Fork District Ranger (Salmon-Challis National Forest) provided her critical experience in managing challenging natural resource issues including: threatened and endangered species, forest and rangeland management, restoration, recreation, and special uses.

Katie has completed a variety of details over the past 10 years including Assistant Field Manager, Planning and Environmental Coordinator, Forest Headwaters Reserve Manager, and Disaster Program Specialist for the United States Forest Service in Washington D.C.

Emmett District Ranger      Katherine.wood@usda.gov      208-365-7000

19. September 2019 · Comments Off on Restore Our Parks & Public Lands · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Link to the Bill

03. September 2019 · Comments Off on Interior Secretary Bernhardt orders ebike access on National Parks & BLM Land · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

By Bruce Brown September 2, 2019 6:38AM PST

Department of the Interior Secretary David Bernhardt signed an order that allows ebike access on federal land. Effective immediately, ebike riders can travel anywhere conventional bicycles are allowed on federally managed public lands.

The purpose of the order is “to increase recreational opportunities for all Americans, especially those with physical limitations, and to encourage the enjoyment of lands and waters managed by the Department of the Interior.” The specific effect is to simplify the rules for using electric bikes on federal lands and to reduce confusion for riders and enforcement personnel.  READ MORE