Today we’re relaunching #VotePublicLands, American Hiking’s nonpartisan voter education and engagement effort.

2020 has been a big year for public lands, and we’ve seen that when the hiking community uses its collective voice we can advance public land priorities. We worked hard for the Great American Outdoors Act to become law with overwhelming bipartisan support, but the work doesn’t stop there. We as hikers need to work towards equitable access to the outdoors for all.

One of the most important ways to make our voices heard is to VOTE. Through #VotePublicLands, American Hiking provides our members and supporters easy to use resources to register to vote, check registration status, and request an absentee ballot/vote by mail.

Explore the key issues to be strong public lands advocates
10. August 2020 · Comments Off on Procedures for Volunteers – Covid-19 Guidlines · Categories: Current Events


VIEW DOCUMENT

09. August 2020 · Comments Off on Cowboy Campground, Idaho City is looking for a Host · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

Update – August 23, 2020 Cowboy Campground has found a host. She will be starting on Wednesday.
Thanks Arlynn

Hi, All –

If you have been in touch with Sabrina recently she may have mentioned to you that we would like to have a camp host up at the campground.  We would like to start our search with the local Backcountry Horsemen chapters, as we feel this would be a great pond to fish in for folks who are competent and trustworthy.  If we don’t find them within your chapters then we will expand our search to other chapters and a few other organizations, such as Facebook groups and maybe the Forest Service.

We have developed the attached flyer for our search.  Would you all be so kind as to send it out to your chapters?

Also, I want to be clear as to which chapter you’re each a part of, so can you reply and let me know, please?

If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact me via Email or my cell at 208-629-9270.

Thanks – Diane Carty  horsey4life@msn.com   

07. July 2020 · Comments Off on Idaho Wildlife Federation – July News Update · Categories: Current Events

LINK TO NEWS

 

30. June 2020 · Comments Off on Trail between Stanley and Redfish Lake is in the right place · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

In March 2019, I retired after a 30-year career as a backcountry recreation manager for the Sawtooth National Recreation Area. In that position, I helped design and lay out many trails including, as my last major trails project, the Galena Summer Trails Network at Galena Lodge.

Based on that experience, I can guarantee that no competent trails designer and few incompetent ones would even consider the trail location along State Highway 75 proposed by Mr. David Boren in the June 14 article in the Idaho Statesman.

In 2005, the Sawtooth National Recreation Area purchased a trail easement across private land now owned by Mr. Boren in the location determined to provide the best recreation opportunity, emphasizing the world-class views of the Sawtooths and ease of trail construction. The trail on the easement is vastly preferable for recreationists who can enjoy the views of the Sawtooths for the entire length of this section of the trail rather than just a short portion of the Boren proposal.

The recreation opportunity provided by the highway trail would not even resemble a desirable experience, and construction of a trail on the extremely steep loose slopes above the highway is impractical in the extreme. The problems with the highway trail, for both construction and experiential reasons are too numerous to mention in the space I have here, but I would eagerly walk both routes with anyone who would like to discuss them.

As to the easement trail’s effects on sandhill crane nesting, the bench is not nesting habitat. Sandhill cranes prefer to nest in riparian areas, not open sagebrush areas. And while elk do use the bench, they are active in the early morning and late evening when use of the trail would be minimal.

The idea that Mr. Boren is concerned about the view of the Sawtooths is a bit confusing, considering that he is building a monster house directly front and center of that view. The few people who get married at the Sawtooth Meditation Chapel and would see the trail, as pointed out by Mr. Boren, pales in comparison to the hundreds of thousands who will have their view marred by his mansion. And I will point out that the land in the foreground of the chapel slopes away from the building and recedes from view quite quickly. And if Mr. Boren does really care about the view, how hard did he try to convince his brother to not build his own mansion, again, front and center of the view of the Sawtooths?

Mr. Boren’s excitement for the view of the Sawtooths that he felt as a child is exactly why the Forest Service is building the trail on the easement, not along the highway. I believe in the power of landscape to inspire people. To spend time immersed in awe can be transformative. I experienced it and over the course of my career in the Sawtooths I had contact with many many others who did, as well. That opportunity for awe is ever-present on the easement trail and is woefully absent from the highway trail.

There is wealth in this landscape. Not wealth that can be measured in dollars and cents, but wealth that fills people’s souls and moves them to greater heights. Science increasingly documents this, and the easement trail provides it; the highway trail decidedly does not. The American people paid for the right to build this trail where it provides the most benefit. Let’s not allow the wealth of “a Boise tech company success story” to deny them that.

Ed Cannady retired last year after working for the U.S. Forest Service for 30 years, many of them as backcountry manager for the Sawtooth National Recreation Area.
03. May 2020 · Comments Off on Interactive BNF Closures Map · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

For the latest Boise National Forest updates visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/boise/home

For all Boise NF closure information visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

Boise National Forest interactive closure story map: https://usfs.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=1b9f2d8115374ad3a943d95decd3835d

National Forests in Idaho closure story map: https://usfs.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=d0588d7e48ee430da80c5ad88c48b43d

03. May 2020 · Comments Off on USDA Forest Service Intermountain Region welcomes acting regional forester · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

Intermountain Region Acting Regional Forester news release 4.20.2020

30. April 2020 · Comments Off on Idaho forests extend campground and hot springs closures, cancel rafting reservations · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

April 29. 2020

As Idaho prepares to reopen some businesses and lift its coronavirus-related stay-home order, some federal agencies are tightening or extending restrictions related to the pandemic.

In a news release on Tuesday, the U.S. Forest Service announced it would extend some closures in the Salmon-Challis National Forest and cancel permits to float the Salmon River and Middle Fork of the Salmon through mid-May. Any “developed recreation sites” including campsites and day-use sites are closed through May 15, while “Forest Trail #6232, the Warm Springs Trail and the area within 250 yards from the center of Gold Bug Hot Springs” will be closed through the end of May.

Officials said anyone with a float permit will receive an email notification that their permit has been canceled, as well as a refund of any fees. Permits are required year-round to float the Salmon River and Middle Fork of the Salmon, though the primary float season is from June to September.

Forest Service officials said the continued closures are meant to prevent the spread of coronavirus and the disease it causes, COVID-19.

“We have visitors that want to enjoy the forest but many areas are drawing more people than social distancing guidelines recommend,” said Chuck Mark, Salmon-Challis National Forest supervisor, in the news release. “As spring progresses, many of these recreation sites are beginning to become accessible. We will continue to monitor the situation closely. The forest is developing a plan to phase reopening some sites when conditions allow.”

Similarly, the Boise National Forest announced on Friday that it would extend closures at campgrounds, hot springs and trailheads through June 30 due to the pandemic. The agency had previously announced that many popular campgrounds near Boise, including Cottonwood, Sage Hen and Peace Valley, would be closed through the end of June; however, its early April closure of hot springs had no initial expiration date.

A list of all affected Boise National Forest sites can be found online at fs.usda.gov.

Also on Tuesday, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced restrictions at Lucky Peak Dam. The Corps said, until further notice, fires and camping are prohibited and boats are required to be docked at a marina or out of the water between sunset and sunrise. According to the Corps’ news release, the restrictions were “made in response to public safety and resource protection concerns,” though it’s not clear if they are related to coronavirus. The Statesman has reached out to the Corps for more information.

BNF-Closed PDF              04-03-2020 Idaho COVID Group Limits of 10 order SIGNED

28. March 2020 · Comments Off on COVID-19 Update (BLM & USFS) · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

VISIT WEB SITE

PDF:COVID-19 USFS 2020-03-28       VISIT WEB SITE

VISIT WEB SITE

13. March 2020 · Comments Off on American Trails – Postings March 2020 · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Read More

Read More

26. February 2020 · Comments Off on Tawnya Brummett selected as Forest Supervisor for Boise National Forest · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

19. February 2020 · Comments Off on HR 5797- Immediate Action Needed by All Trail Enthusiasts! · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

READ MORE

15. February 2020 · Comments Off on Field Notes 02/14/2020 – National Wilderness Stewardship Alliance · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Hike the Hill

This week was the annual gathering of the national scenic and historic trail community in DC to educate Congress, meet with agencies, and build support for trails.  NWSA was there along with Back Country Horsemen and other Wilderness groups to lend our voice and to expand opportunities for wilderness stewardship.

We are happy to report that the Forest Service Chief took this opportunity to express her full support for Shared Stewardship and to renew the NFS Trail Stewardship Partner funding for $200,000 in 2020.  Find more details here.

This is in addition to the $200,000 already secured for Wilderness Stewardship Performance activities.

Applications for both programs are due by March 30th.

Webinars

Tuesday, March 10 at 1:00 PM Mountain

Leave No Trace  — Refresher, Updates, Resources

Erin Collier, Brice Esplin, and Faith Overall

What’s new with Leave No Trace, and how can you incorporate the principles into your daily work?  Erin Collier & Brice Esplin, Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers, will provide a general Leave No Trace refresher with an emphasis on updates, research, and resources, geared toward wilderness stewardship groups and agency partners. Faith Overall, Leave No Trace’s Education and Outreach coordinator and volunteer for the Indian Peaks Wilderness Alliance will also join to provide a volunteer perspective and answer questions on getting more involved.

Register Here

Wilderness Workshop Presentations and Videos

Many presentations at the Workshop are posted on the WORKSHOP PAGE .  You can also find the Program and Abstracts.  Several of the main sessions were video taped and as soon as they are available will be placed on this page as well.  The Final Plenary session and Derick Lugo’s Closing Presentation are now available online.

The 2020 Funding Program Application Periods are Open

As noted above NWSA has two funding programs for wilderness stewards.

The Wilderness Stewardship Performance Partner Funding and

The National Forest System Trail Stewardship Partner Funding.

Both application periods will end March 30, 2020.

Now is the time to renew your memberships for 2020.  WSP Funding requires a NWSA membership in order to apply.

Renew NOW

In other Member News:  Memberships will now track calendar years.  Memberships renewals for 2020 began October 1st and are good for the entire calendar year 2020.  Participate in Funding programs, get discounts to the National Wilderness Workshop and keep informed about national issues affecting wilderness stewardship.

Forest Service WSP Webinars now Posted

The latest WSP webinars are posted on Wilderness Connect.  The webinars include the Plants element and Recreation Sites element.

These webinars can be found at the link below, along with the nine other WSP elements already posted and of course the other outstanding past and planned webinars by the Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center, Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, and other great partners.

https://wilderness.net/practitioners/training/free-webinars/default.php

TAKE ACTION: SUPPORT PUBLIC LAND ACCESS NOW!

The time is here to add your voice in support of public access. The Public Access Protection Act (PAPA) was assigned a bill number and awaits introduction. Now, Senate leadership decides whether to allow the bill an introduction, opening the bill for public support or criticism.

If you support protecting public access, Senators Winder, Vick, Hill, and Heider need to hear from you- that you support PAPA and want a public introduction of S1317 in the Senate Resources Committee by February 26th. Enter your name on the form below to ask our state leadership to protect access to your public lands.

08. February 2020 · Comments Off on Idaho parks department eyes voluntary trail pass program. · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Idaho Trails Supporter Fact Sheet

Hey Folks – I have attached the fact sheet for our voluntary sticker program. The short – The voluntary sticker (or pass) is a $10 minimum donation available to the public on June 6th, National trails day. They will be primarily available online.

Thanks!

Tom Helmer
Non-Motorized Trails Program Manager
5657 Warm Springs Ave|Boise, ID 83716
tel (208) 514-2419 | mobile (208) 914-4821

**************************************************************************************
February 07, 2020
BOISE, Idaho

The director of the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation said Friday that his agency is starting a voluntary trail pass program as part of a long-range goal to raise awareness and eventually money for non-motorized trail maintenance.

David Langhorst told the Legislature’s budget-setting committee that interest in the 900-mile (1,450-kilometer) Idaho Centennial Trail has been growing.

He said motorized trail groups have been effective in persuading lawmakers to tax or place fees on those user groups for trail maintenance.

But he said non-motorized trail users have been somewhat resistant to those kinds of user fees. He said the voluntary trail pass could help change minds.

Read more here: https://www.sacbee.com/news/business/article240081138.html#storylink=cpy
17. January 2020 · Comments Off on Speak Up for Salmon · Categories: Current Events

If you’ve been looking for an opportunity to speak up for salmon, steelhead, and Idaho’s river communities, here’s an excellent opportunity!

This Friday, January 17th, the Governor’s Salmon Workgroup will hold a public comment period from 5-7pm in the Lincoln Auditorium at the State House in Boise: 700 W Jefferson St. Anyone is welcome to sit in on the meeting or sign up to give public testimony, and each individual will be allotted 3 minutes. We hope to see you there!

On Saturday, the group will meet at the University of Idaho Boise Water Center to conduct a group meeting amongst Workgroup members. The public is also invited to sit in on this meeting.

As a reminder, IWF is a member of the Workgroup and sits alongside a diverse group of stakeholders that represent varying interests throughout Idaho and the region.

You can find the full meeting agenda for both days here.

14. January 2020 · Comments Off on Wild Spotter – Mapping Invasive Species · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands


You can help fight back against invasive species in America’s wild places by downloading the FREE Wild Spotter Mobile App on your smartphone or other mobile device. You’ll learn how to identify, map, and prevent the spread of these invaders in order to protect our rivers, mountains, forests, and all wild places for future generations. Learn more by watching the Wild Spotter Introduction Video.

Volunteers are a vital part of the Wild Spotter campaign! To become a volunteer, register either online or download the FREE Wild Spotter Mobile App on your smartphone or other mobile device. Once registered, reach out to your nearest National Forest or Grassland to discover how you can volunteer to help support and protect these beautiful places from invasive species. Then, just get outside and enjoy America’s wild places while keeping an eye out for those harmful invaders!  https://wildspotter.org/

06. January 2020 · Comments Off on SRA – IDPR Grants for 2021- Need support · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands, Work Parties and Projects

January 6, 2020

By Kent May – Trails Supervisor Sawtooth National Recreation Area

For 2021 RTP we are replacing two log boardwalks/puncheon, and removing two others on the Livingston Mill trail (pics attached). The two that are removed, will have the stream crossing hardened with rock to prevent erosion. On top of the infrastructure work, we will be doing 90 miles of heavy maintenance to trails in and accessing the White Clouds Wilderness.

  

Replace these

   

Remove these and harden trail

For 2021 ORMV we are building 25’ of puncheon over a perennial stream on Grand Prize motorized single track trail (pic attached). For this grant there will also be a maintenance component of 100 miles of heavy maintenance to motorized trails, paying special attention to the Grand Prize trail to prevent any motorized encroachment into the Boulder Wilderness.

We are looking for support letters for our 2021 IDPR Grants

31. December 2019 · Comments Off on BCHI State Board Meeting & Convention · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Current Events

Treasure Valley Chapter – Facebook Page

Information PDF

New Year Greetings to Squaw Butte BCHI Members,

The 2020 BOD Meeting and Convention information and registration form is on the BCHI website on the Activities’ page http://www.bchi.org/activities.htm. Please open it and read through it. There are substantial savings for registering early, rather than later, because we want members who have never attended to join us for the convention: $70 for person and only $120 per couple. Early registrations will be postmarked before March 1st. We are also offering substantial discounts for young attendees, whether members or not, at only $20 per ticket for the dinner/convention. And, we are selling dinner tickets for adults who wish to attend the social hour, dinner, and live auction, only, at $25.

All delegates must pay the full convention registration fee if they are voting delegates, and all BCHI members who attend the convention for the day, regardless if they vote, must pay the full–$70 single, $120 couple (early fees) or $85 per person (after Feb. 29)–registration fee.

We have placed the option of paying only $25 for dinner as a courtesy in the case someone’s travel partner or friend wants to attend dinner. A $25 dinner ticket holder will be allowed in the building at 5:00pm.
We have different fees to allow for flexibility, in the hope that more members will attend. We want all to take advantage of the savings without taking advantage of us and the costs of putting on the convention. (And, though not explained in the website info, part of the fees go to pay for Friday’s meetings.

We have placed a little information about motels and eateries on the site as well. Please note that to get a room at the Best Western Plus Peppertree across the parking lot from the Nampa Civic Center, the venue for the convention, you must click into the Best Western Motel Reservation URL, Best Western Motel Reservation URL ; scroll down to see Backcountry Horsemen discount prices. I believe that the Best Western would only reserve 20 rooms for this function, so log in early. For those who cannot use a computer, we are reserved under Backcountry Horsemen under Group ID #Z81XT6F7.

Please take the time to read through the information on the BCHI website, which may change, slightly, as we near the events. We have three great presentations on Saturday from Madison Seamons (stock care–very entertaining), Cheryl Bice (emergency care), and Alayne Blickel (managing your horse pasture/corral areas)…so get on board and get your registrations in early.

Alice Millington
Treasure Valley BCHI President
McCall, ID
millington0606@gmail.com
208-475-4107

13. December 2019 · Comments Off on Idaho Rangeland Resources Commission · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Idaho Rangeland Resources Commission 
2019-IRRC-Annual-Report

06. December 2019 · Comments Off on Recovering America’s Wildlife Act · Categories: Current Events

Tomorrow, the House Natural Resources Committee will vote on a piece of critically important legislation for wildlife, the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, and we need your help in asking Idaho Congressman Russ Fulcher to vote “yes”!

Idaho houses some of the most iconic wildlife in the nation including bighorn sheep, mountain goats, and anadromous salmon and steelhead. But those species, and hundreds more in Idaho, are at risk. The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act would provide $1.4 billion annually to state and tribal wildlife agencies across the nation. The money would aid local, on-the-ground work benefitting hunters and anglers and anyone who appreciates Idaho’s diverse and iconic wildlife species.

Please join us in asking Representative Fulcher to stand up for Idaho’s sportsmen and women through his support of this monumental legislation.

Follow THIS LINK to email Congressman Fulcher.

01. December 2019 · Comments Off on E-Bikes welcome on ‘motorized use’ Forest Service trails, roads · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

24. November 2019 · Comments Off on Squaw Butte Annual Food & Funds drive for People & Pets · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

It is that holiday time of year when the generous members of Back Country Horsemen – Squaw Butte Chapter donate food, funds and pet supplies to local organization in Gem county.

Food & Funds will be collected at the December monthly chapter meeting Thursday December 5th, and at the Holiday Pot-Luck Saturday December 7th.

2019 Food-Pet Drive Information

03. October 2019 · Comments Off on Idaho Wildlife Federation – Public Lands Blog · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

LINK TO BLOG

22. September 2019 · Comments Off on Katie Wood, new Emmett District Ranger · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

Boise, Idaho, September 16, 2019—The Boise National Forest welcomes Katie Wood, as the new District Ranger in Emmett.

Katie served as the Boise District, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Support Services and Operations Chief since February 2017. She has overseen a wide diversity of areas including: emergency stabilization and rehabilitation, engineering, heavy equipment, GIS, administration and noxious and invasive weeds.

“I look forward to working in cooperation with the public while serving in this role. My goal is to ensure the Emmett Ranger District is managed in a way that takes into account the needs of current users without losing sight that future generations will need, and rely on, public lands as much as we do. This is particularly relevant given the Emmett Ranger District’s proximity to Idaho’s largest population center and the mixed uses which occur on this land.” Said Katie Wood, Emmett District Ranger.

Her tenure as Challis-Yankee Fork District Ranger (Salmon-Challis National Forest) provided her critical experience in managing challenging natural resource issues including: threatened and endangered species, forest and rangeland management, restoration, recreation, and special uses.

Katie has completed a variety of details over the past 10 years including Assistant Field Manager, Planning and Environmental Coordinator, Forest Headwaters Reserve Manager, and Disaster Program Specialist for the United States Forest Service in Washington D.C.

Emmett District Ranger      Katherine.wood@usda.gov      208-365-7000

19. September 2019 · Comments Off on Restore Our Parks & Public Lands · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Link to the Bill

03. September 2019 · Comments Off on Interior Secretary Bernhardt orders ebike access on National Parks & BLM Land · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

By Bruce Brown September 2, 2019 6:38AM PST

Department of the Interior Secretary David Bernhardt signed an order that allows ebike access on federal land. Effective immediately, ebike riders can travel anywhere conventional bicycles are allowed on federally managed public lands.

The purpose of the order is “to increase recreational opportunities for all Americans, especially those with physical limitations, and to encourage the enjoyment of lands and waters managed by the Department of the Interior.” The specific effect is to simplify the rules for using electric bikes on federal lands and to reduce confusion for riders and enforcement personnel.  READ MORE

17. August 2019 · Comments Off on Four Rivers RMP needs a Sportsman’s Voice · Categories: Current Events

The Bureau of Land Management is accepting comments on the Four Rivers Field Office Draft Resource Management Plan until August 22nd. Once finalized, the RMP will guide the management of 800,000 acres of public land within an 8-million-acre planning area spanning from the Bennett Hills, across the Boise Front, and to the banks of Brownlee Reservoir for at least two decades.

You can submit your own comments here.

Several hundred pages (and even three pages of acronyms) spell out the proposed management each alternative would take, comparing them to the current condition and management directive. Fire management, minerals and energy, wildlife, recreation, grazing, cultural resources, socioeconomics – you name it, it’s evaluated in this plan.

The BLM has set a range of alternatives with varying degrees of resource extraction availability, wildlife protections, and access considerations. Idaho Wildlife Federation urges the BLM to take proactive measures to protect highly productive chukar habitat, pronghorn and mule deer winter range.  READ MORE

17. August 2019 · Comments Off on Endangered Species Act · Categories: Current Events

12. August 2019 · Comments Off on BCHI & Idaho Horse Council · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Current Events

BCHI 2019 IHC report / Link to Web Site

12. August 2019 · Comments Off on Happy 75, Smokey · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events, Education

A Better Way to Think About Wildland Fires

04. July 2019 · Comments Off on GPSMAP® 66i – GPS Handheld and Satellite Communicator · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events, Tips, Tricks and Tid Bits

Part Number 010-02088-01 Available at REI

03. July 2019 · Comments Off on IWF – July Update · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Read about this and other important issues in Idaho

19. June 2019 · Comments Off on Owyhee Canyonlands BLM Management Plan Comment Period · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Send A Comment to the BLM

Dive deeper

This process is a key opportunity to help protect habitat of the imperiled sage grouse, determine where Off-Road Vehicles can and cannot travel, and protect wild desert places to camp, hike and bird. You can help shape how these lands will be managed for decades to come. Three main issues will be addressed in this planning process: Lands with Wilderness Characteristics, Off-Road Vehicle and Travel Management and Livestock Grazing. Take a deeper dive on these issues with these useful resources from Owyhee Coalition partner, Oregon Natural Desert Association:

Other ways to make your voice heard

The comment period is open until August 28, 2019. Right now is a critical window of time to make your voice heard and ensure the BLM knows there is widespread support for strong, conservation-focused management in this landscape.

  • Attend a public meeting hosted by the BLM in Ontario, McDermitt or Jordan Valley
  • Attend a comment writing session in Portland, Bend, Ontario or Boise. Event details coming soon.
24. May 2019 · Comments Off on BLM – Four Rivers Draft Resource Management Plan · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands


The Four Rivers Field Office Draft Resource Management Plan and Draft Environmental Impact Statement is now available for public comment

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Boise District, Four Rivers Field Office (FRFO) has prepared a Draft Resource Management Plan and Draft Environmental Impact Statement (Draft RMP/EIS) for public lands within its Planning Area. The Draft RMP/EIS describes and analyzes management alternatives for the public lands and resources managed by the FRFO and provides BLM with a comprehensive framework for administering public lands. This document also analyzes the future use and management direction of the many natural and cultural resources found in the Planning Area over the next 20 years and beyond. The Draft RMP/EIS informs the public about potential management options.

The FRFO encompasses an area located in southwestern Idaho extending north of the Snake River from approximately Glenns Ferry in the southeast, west to Weiser, and north to McCall.  The planning area includes all of the FRFO located outside the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area (NCA) which is governed by a separate RMP.  The planning area encompasses approximately 783,000 surface acres and 1,173,150 acres of mineral estate in Ada, Adams, Boise, Camas, Canyon, Elmore, Gem, Owyhee, Payette, Valley and Washington counties administered by the BLM.

When approved, this RMP will guide the management of public lands administered by the FRFO into the future and will replace the 1988 Cascade RMP, the 1983 Kuna Management Framework Plan (MFP) and the portion of the 1987 Jarbidge RMP covering lands within the FRFO. The BLM encourages the public to provide information and comments pertaining to the analysis presented in the Draft RMP/EIS. We are particularly interested in feedback concerning the adequacy and accuracy of the proposed alternatives, the analysis of their respective management decisions, and any new information that would help the BLM as it develops the plan. In developing the Proposed RMP/Final EIS, which is the next phase of the planning process, the decision maker may select various management decisions from each of the alternatives analyzed in the Draft RMP/EIS for the purpose of creating a management strategy that best meets the needs of the resources and values in this area under the BLM multiple use and sustained yield mandate.

For the latest information on the planning schedule, please see the timeline page.  LINK TO DRAFT PLAN

19. May 2019 · Comments Off on Annual Public Outreach & Yard Sale · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

Weather all week had been monsoons, and it was still poring Friday night, but all the TV weather people promised that Saturday would be nice and sunny, although I think most doubted it would be!

When I was hooking up my trainer at 06:30 Saturday morning the clouds in the Montour-Sweet valley were only about 100 feet off the ground and the sky was still gray, but what the heck, we will give it a go!

Linda & Tom Hughes, Bill Holt, Charles & Lorraine Chick, Arlynn Hacker, Nancy Smith, Carmen Tyack, Ron Fergie and Rob Adams were soon busy setting up tables and awing and laying out treasure for our loyal friends and customers who stop by at our yard sales each year.  The weather was still iffy, but we had our fingers crossed.

A few people showed up but it was a very slow start, so we started to play with some of our items,
Tom Hughes found a kilt that the women convinced him to model. Everyone though he looked very fetching!
Janine Townsend should up with a number of boxes and when we unpacked one we found a Chicken & Pig suit. Carmen and Lorraine put them on and modeled them for the group, then they got some bar chairs and went out and sat by the road, waving at the passing cars. After a couple of near wrecks they put the costumes on the rack, but their antics got the crowds coming to visit us.Charles Chick found some stuffed animals and turned one into a hat


People starting buying thing and the cash box slowly started filling mostly with dollar bills. We had a lot of Toonies donations as the Canadians would say, two dollars at a time. There were very few donations over 20 dollars. Fanny Burki decided she needed some of our treasure for her house and became the big chapter donor.



Then Dee Kincaid showed up and donated a great print with custom frame. This treasure will be held by the chapter until the next convention and use as one of the auction items. Thanks Dee!  By 16:00 what was left on the table had been boxed up to be donated and the cash box tallied, Not a bad day, $1081.05 in donations collected!

04. May 2019 · Comments Off on Idaho Wild Life Federation – May News · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

READ FULL STORY
READ FULL STORY

04. May 2019 · Comments Off on Supporting Idaho Diabetes Youth Programs (dba Camp Hodia) · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

LINK TO DONATION PAGE

25. March 2019 · Comments Off on Saddle Tune UP – DeMac Mules · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

Bob McFadden has a spring special going for BCHI members.  A complete cleaning, repair and conditioning of your saddle.  My 17 year old McCall Packer was in serious need of some TLC.  Bob did a great job and I am ready for the next 10 year on the trail.

EPSON MFP image

18. March 2019 · Comments Off on 26 years managing wild horses in Gem County · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

About 15 miles north of Emmett is 25,806 acres of rolling hills, prominent buttes and ridgelines that make up the Bureau of Land Management’s Four-Mile Wild Horse Management Area (HMA). Elevations vary from 2,500 to about 5,400 feet.

The Four-Mile population census taken in February 2018 was 128 horses according to Boise District BLM Wild Horse and Burro Specialist Raul Trevino.

History of Gem’s wild horses

The Four-Mile horses originated from domestic stock owned by those living in the Big Willow Creek and Four-Mile Creek areas. Pinto horses were raised by Jack Macomb in the 1930s in the Four Mile Canyon. Others raised horses in the area including Nelson McCullough on Willow Creek, Tom Wilburn on South Crane Creek and Walter Knox on the Indian Jake Ranch. These horses were not considered wild according to the BLM until people came and tried to catch them or chase them. Being difficult to corral, they were considered wild. Sixty-five privately owned horses were rounded up and removed in 1965.

At the passage of the Free Roaming Horse and Burro Act in 1971, two HMAs were identified and BLM was given authority to manage wild horses and burros on public lands. There were 75 horses in the 4-Mile HMA and West Crane HMA. Decisions removed the horses permanently from West Crane and reduced the Four-Mile to the appropriate management level of 20 head for rangeland health.

An aerial survey in 1972 counted a total of 13 adult and two foals. Of those, one was a mule, one wore a halter and another horse wore hobbles.

During a 1986 wildfire in the Four-Mile HMA, 14,000 acres burned. The horses were removed January 1987 due to a lack of forage on their home range and to allow vegetation recovery. The area was aerially seeded with grasses and forbs. Then in the fall of 1991, nine horses from the Owyhee Resource Area were introduced back into the Four-Mile HMA. Three years later there were 12 head on 18,018 acres.

Currently there are 128 horses in the HMA. The Low Allowable Management level is 37 head for the area, so the BLM is in the process of gathering and removing horses to meet the allowable number. BLM manages a total of six wild horse herd management areas in Idaho on approximately 418,000 acres of private, public and state lands.

As of March 1, 2018, the wild horse and burro population on public lands was estimated at 82,000 animals, which is more than triple the number of animals the land can support in conjunction with other legally mandated land uses. Four-Mile HMA is also overpopulated.

04. March 2019 · Comments Off on 2019 Idaho Sportsman Show · Categories: Around The Campfire, BCHI /BCHA, Current Events, Education



For the 10th year the south western Idaho chapters of Back Country Horsemen of Idaho, Boise, Squaw Butte and Treasure Valley have manned a BCHI information booth at the Idaho Sportsman show at the Expo Idaho grounds. As in years past our booth was next to Public Land Agencies, the US Forest Service and BLM. Our display generated a lot of interest, with lots of questions about the various pictures and the trail safety posters. We handed out lots of information about BCHI, and the ITA (Idaho Trails Association) who partners with our chapters on wilderness projects. Thank you to the members of the Boise and Treasure Valley chapters who stood booth shifts, and to the Squaw Butte Members, David Benson, Charles & Lorraine Chick, Shannon Schantz, Nancy Smith, Arlynn Hacker, Phil Ryan, Carmen Tyack, Bill Holt, Rob Adams and Bill & Marybeth Conger.

01. March 2019 · Comments Off on Idaho Public Land Bills – 2019 · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

ttacks to Idaho’s public lands in the Idaho legislature have been on the rise. This year, IWF has worked hard to shed light on legislation moving through the State House that negatively impact Idaho’s public lands and your public land rights. HJM5, HJM8 and HB162 all have negative consequences for Idaho’s lands and wildlife and all four passed through the House, now bound for the Senate. You can find out more about each bill on our website.

01. March 2019 · Comments Off on 2019 – Packing Clinic – Squaw Butte · Categories: Around The Campfire, BCHI /BCHA, Current Events, Education


2019 PACK CLINIC

02. February 2019 · Comments Off on Idaho Wildlife Federation – Bill Tracker · Categories: Current Events

Link to Website

16. December 2018 · Comments Off on Idaho Wildlife Federation – December News · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Deeds Reveal Billionaire Brothers Illegally Gated Public Road

Contact: Brian Brooks, Idaho Wildlife Federation, (208) 870-7967

BOISE – The Idaho Wildlife Federation has found deeds from past landowners granting easements for sections of Forest Road 374, the Boise Ridge Road, for public use in perpetuity. The easements apply to the sections of road the Wilks’ brothers company, DF Development, has recently installed gates on, making the installations a violation of Idaho law.

Earlier this fall the Texas billionaire Wilks brothers made waves by installing gates on the very popular Boise Ridge Road located just north of Boise, which is frequently used by Idahoans for hunting and recreation access on the Boise National Forest. But Brian Brooks, executive director of the Idaho Wildlife Federation says, “this is about more than just gates. This is about wealthy individuals flaunting Idaho’s laws and illegally claiming public resources as their own without repercussions. And it spurs the question- how many more public roads have they illegally claimed as their own?”
IWF’s investigation into the construction of the Boise Ridge Road revealed the road was built with public dollars, and has been maintained using taxpayer dollars. The road was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s using public funds for the purpose of public use and fire management. Through a Freedom of Information Act request submitted by The Wilderness Society and shared with the Idaho Wildlife Federation, it was found that taxpayers have been footing the bill for maintaining the road for nearly 90 years, fulfilling prescriptive road easement requirements.

“DF Development has never had the right to close or install gates on the Boise Ridge Road, because it belongs to the public. These out-of-state folks have a lot of nerve coming into Idaho and gating a road that was built and paid for by the public,” says Brooks.

Current Idaho law prohibits marking public lands and roads as private. However, as a criminal violation only, a government entity must initiate the lawsuit for its enforcement. “The law lacks a civil remedy common in property disputes, which would give Idaho citizens the power to resolve the issue peer to peer in court,” according to Brooks.

“Counties are strapped for resources, especially rural counties where these violations are happening. Choosing to derail county budgets to prosecute billionaires over access issues, while burdened with more heinous crimes, is not financially practical. It’s time we give citizens legal recourse to enforce public access. By adding a civil remedy to the existing law we can save taxpayer dollars and mobilize enforcement procedures faster.”

Adding a civil suit clause will require action by the state legislature and could be passed as an amendment to the recently updated trespass law, the same law the Wilks brothers lobbied for. During the 2018 legislative session, IWF attempted to include a civil remedy provision to the legislation, but the idea was rebuffed and Idaho’s citizens were kept from enforcing their right to access public property. IWF is vetting potential legislation to lawmakers and interest groups for the 2019 session.

“It’s a small change. A civil remedy exists to protect private property rights. Now it’s time to protect public property rights.”

MORE NEWS from IWF

Matthew interviewed by Becca Aceto

Worn leather boots lined the wall and a dusty wood stove sat in the corner of the room, ready for the inevitable chill to return to the mountains. “What we really need right now is a whiskey.” I smiled at this remark.

Matthew’s small cabin was dimly lit and a faint smell of game meat lingered in the air, the only trace of meals past. Out the front door and across the airstrip mules and horses snoozed in the midday sun. A few miles to our north and less to the east was the massive Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

We talked for over an hour, laughing about ornery mules in the backcountry and reminiscing of trips past. Some of the wildest places in the lower 48 have shaped Matthew, both professionally and personally. I’d also like to point out that Matthew never mentioned a specific animal he’d harvested or shot he’d taken. His words were of experience and place – he puts great value on the intrinsic worth of things. I was glad to sit down and have this conversation. Enjoy!

B: Tell me a bit about your background. Did you grow up outdoors and hunting?

M: I sure did. My father is a lifetime hunter who had me out in the woods of Missouri with him from a young age. We’d hunt deer, turkeys and squirrels on both private and public land. I also ran my own traplines beginning in middle school, water trapping for beavers, muskrat, mink and otters predominantly. Paddling a canoe down the river checking traps really builds up an appreciation of the natural world in someone. I don’t trap anymore. Now my dad comes out to Montana every fall and we take the mules into the Scapegoat and Bob Marshall wilderness to hunt elk and deer.

B: So how’d you get into packing?

M: I got into packing when I was 18 as a trail crew member in the Bob Marshall Wilderness and learned from a fellow who’s the lead packer there to this day. Our trail crew would take stock out to self-support us during 10-day hitches. I went to Glacier National Park a couple years later as a backcountry ranger. I used stock and learned a lot more about packing from a guy who was the lead packer there for over 30 years.

I really learned a lot when I started working with an outfitter out of Augusta, Montana packing and guiding elk and deer hunts in the Bob Marshall and Scapegoat. We had one camp that was a 24-mile ride one way over the highest pass in the Bob. That’s some wild country back there. I like having grizzlies on the landscape. You get an elk down, snow is falling and you see fresh griz tracks bigger than your head, all the while thinking “I wonder if it’s on the elk.” It’s great.

B: Do you see yourself fitting into the realm of conservation through this work?

M: Absolutely. I support public access for fishermen, hunters, hikers, backpackers – really anyone using the country I work in. I also support trail crews and rangers to get trails opened up and to make sure regulations are followed in the backcountry. I pack out a lot of trash, too. Last year during the solar eclipse I spent a week in the White Clouds. We had a lot of people in the mountains so I made sure everyone was following fire restrictions and wilderness regulations over the span of that week. Fortunately people were pretty knowledgeable so I didn’t have much work to do. In 2016 I packed the chief of the Forest Service as well as Mike Simpson and a few others into the newly-designated White Clouds Wilderness which was a really good time. That trip left a big impression on everyone.

B: Have you had any wildlife encounters while packing that could have been a bit hairy?

M: Oh, once I was leading a pack string through Glacier National Park and we came across a grizzly chowing down on glacier lilies. I started yelling at it, “Hey, bear! Hey, bear!” It didn’t even look up so I just rode right on by. The stock did great, didn’t make a fuss at all.

B: And the bear?

M: That damn bear never even looked up. Just kept on eating as we passed by at about 20 yards.

B: Do you have any conservation idols who come to mind?

M: It’s hard for me to just pick one, but I really like the Montana writer and conservationist Joseph Kinsey Howard. I also like Wallace Stegner and Jack Turner. And Fred Bear is probably my favorite hunter/conservationist.

B: Any hunting stories that have stuck with you over the years?

M: Oh, well there was this one time… A few years back I was hunting deer at the edge of a meadow near a clear cut. Suddenly this mountain lion walks out into the meadow not 40 yards from me, lays down and takes a nap. It was there for three hours and the whole time I just sat there watching. Every now and then it would lift its head up, look around and yawn, then lay back down. Finally, it got up and stretched with lazy kitten eyes that I was watching through my binoculars. I turned around for just a second to look for deer on the hill behind me and when I turned back around the cat was gone. Just like that. It was amazing.

B: Any final thoughts?

M: The best thing I can say is that I am poor in the sense that I own no house and no property but living between Idaho and Montana I am so land rich as a citizen of the United States. I can head out my door and do an array of activities on millions and millions of acres. It’s unparalleled. Let’s hope lots of folks step up to keep it that way.

Matthew Chappell is a wilderness packer for the Payette National Forest. He spends half his year packing in Idaho’s wilderness areas and the other half at his home on the edge of the Bob Marshall Wilderness in Montana.

17. November 2018 · Comments Off on The Bunker Hill Mine deposited 75 million tons of toxic sludge in Lake Coeur d’Alene · Categories: Current Events

The EPA can’t wait to reopen the mine that poisoned North Idaho,

For a century, the mines of the Coeur d’Alene Mountains in North Idaho produced much of the heavy metals that made the U.S. a global superpower. Starting in the 1880s, through the rise of industrialization, the introduction of the automobile, and two world wars, a few narrow canyons in the Coeur d’Alenes yielded more than 11 million tons of zinc, lead, and silver, as much as a fifth of U.S. production.

Mining has left a mark on the culture of the Silver Valley and an indelible stain on the landscape, which remains heavily contaminated. To extract a pound of metal, mining companies had to process nearly 14 pounds of ore, and they dumped the crushed waste rock into mountain streams and along river banks. Over the course of a century, the tailings and mine drainage flowed down the 40-mile-long watershed, depositing some 75 million tons of highly toxic sludge into Lake Coeur d’Alene. House cats convulsed from drinking the water. Migratory tundra swans suffered slow deaths as their digestive tracts seized up from lead poisoning, causing both suffocation and starvation as undigested food backed up into their long necks. Children in the Silver Valley in the 1970s registered some of the highest levels of lead in their bloodstreams recorded anywhere.  READ MORE & SEE PICTURES

By Kyle Johnson for Bloomberg News

09. November 2018 · Comments Off on End of Season Party, Tuesday Dec 11 , 2018 · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

End of Season Party, Tuesday Dec 11 , 2018
Time 18:00 – 22:00 (6-10 pm) 
Pot-luck dinner for members and guests

Food Drive – We will be collecting monetary donations for the GEM County Food Bank

Pet Food Drive – We will be collecting $ or donations of pet food (PAL)

Gift Exchange
Pictures  2016   2017
Location:  Rebecca Ignacio Party Venue 4131 West Central Road, Emmett
Contacts: Shannon Schantz & Party Committee  208-365-7691 

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19. October 2018 · Comments Off on Trailer Doctor – Emmett Idaho · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

Trailer Doctor, 1577 N Plaza Rd, Emmett, ID 83617
Contact: Mike NYCE    https://www.facebook.com/Trailer-Doctor-188801334530051/

I had Mike over to work on my two horse trailers.  My goose-neck trailer was in need of new brakes after ten year of hauling it all over the back country including a number of trips to the Stanley Basin.  My Green three horse trailer needed its bearing packed and to sort out an intermittent electrical problem.

Mike comes to your location and brings a complete shop with him!

The electrical problem with the green trailer was a broken ground wire. BUT, while confirming that everything was working we found out that the wire that enable the brakes had come loose so the trailer brakes were not helping the truck to stop. Lucky for me, I only carry one or two horses in that trailer and generally only on day rides. The fact I didn’t notice is on me!
I was pleased with the quality of Mikes work and I though he charged a reasonable price.

08. October 2018 · Comments Off on October 7th, 4 Mile Creek Wild Horse Area · Categories: Current Events, Education, Fun Rides

Sunday morning, October 7th, 2018 was sunny and crisp and had the look of a day for an almost perfect fall ride. The road to the packing area for this ride was still damp from the rain the day before, so no dust, and it had been graded recently so was pretty smooth. By 10:15 all the members who had signed up for the ride where finishing up getting their horses ready and by 10:30 we were heading up the left fork of the road to the gate that allows you to enter the south-west corner of this BLM area.

The gate was open, so we didn’t have to stop and the group spread out to climb up to the top of the first rise. There is no defined trail here, so members were picking their way up the hill side. Shannon, Nancy and two other riders were leading the way and Shannon’s horse wanted to lope up the slope. Shannon tried to slow her to a walk, but instead the mare reversed course and started loping down hill. This lope, turned more buck like and Shannon was pitched face first down the slope. Where she lay not moving. The group sprang into action, with half seeing to Shannon and the others catching her horse and holding the others. The first aid kit was taken off the back of Rob’s saddle and a patient assessment was started. Shannon was awake and aware and was able to tell us what she though was going on. She was able to set up after a bit and indicated she though she might have broken her arm or dislocated her shoulder.Under Shannon’s guidance for the most comfortable position of the arm, we used a down vest rolled up to act as a pillow and place it between her body and her fore arm which she was supporting. We then used her jacket and some vet-rap to fashion a sling. This arrangement allowed Shannon to walk back to the road while other brought her horse. By 12:00 Shannon was on her way to further medical care.  I talked to Shannon at 17:30 Sunday night, and she said that she had dislocated her right shoulder which had been restored to it’s correct location, but she had also damaged some tendon and ligament attachments which would require further medical attention.

The members who continued the ride saw a coyote, hawks, antelope and ten mustangs.

Secure dislocated shoulder, and get patient to a doctor
By Alton Thygerson – BYU

The shoulder is your body’s most mobile joint because it can turn in many directions. But this advantage also makes it easy to dislocate.

A partial dislocation (subluxation) means the head of the upper arm bone (humerus) is partially out of the socket (glenoid). A complete dislocation means it’s all the way out.

Both partial and complete dislocations cause extreme pain and unsteadiness in the shoulder. The shoulder muscles may have spasms from the disruption, and this can make it hurt even more.

Symptoms include swelling, numbness, weakness and bruising. Sometimes a dislocation may tear ligaments or tendons in the shoulder. Once in awhile, the dislocation may damage the nerves. The victim will guard the shoulder and try to protect it by holding the dislocated arm in a fixed position away from the chest wall. The victim is unable to touch the opposite shoulder with the hand on the injured side.

The shoulder joint can dislocate forward, backward or downward. The most common (90 percent) type of shoulder dislocation is when the shoulder slips forward (anterior instability). This means the upper arm bone moved forward and down out of the joint. It may happen when the arm is in a throwing position or held up high over the head, as in kayaking.

So what do you do if you come across someone with a dislocated shoulder?

1. Place an ice pack for about 15 minutes over the injured shoulder. (Unable to do where accident occurred)

2. Give the patient analgesics, such as acetaminophen, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, such as aspirin or ibuprofen, to help reduce pain. (We didn’t, but could have)

3. Stabilize the shoulder against movements by placing a pillow or rolled blankets or towels between the arm and chest to fill the space between the arm and the chest wall. Once the arm is stabilized in this way, the elbow can usually be flexed to 90 degrees without causing further pain. Apply an arm sling to the forearm and wrist to support the weight of the arm. Secure the arm in the sling to the pillow and chest with a swath made either from a folded triangular bandage or a gauze bandage. (We used Shannon’s jacket to secure her arm and shoulder. Leaving the left arm of her jacket in place, we used the right sleeve of the jacket, routed under the right arm pit then looped under her forearm and then attached to itself with vet-rap. A down vest was placed between the arm and her body acting as a pillow and supporting the shoulder. We could have use triangle bandages to also build a sling. Shannon indicated that this was the most comfortable position. Shannon was able to walk down the hill to the road and her truck, when Nancy drove he to medical care)

4. Check the pulse at the wrist for signs of circulation. If there is no pulse, medical care should be sought immediately.

5. Seek medical care. Transport the victim in a sitting or semi-seated position.

If you and the patient are in a remote location and far from medical care, an anterior dislocated shoulder can be put back into place (reduced) if you have proper training. It should NOT be attempted when medical care is near or when proper training is absent.

At the hospital or doctor’s office a doctor will examine the shoulder and may order an X-ray. It’s important for the doctor to know how the dislocation happened. Was it an injury? Has the patient ever dislocated the shoulder before? The doctor will place the ball of the humerus back into the joint socket. This process is called closed reduction. The severe pain stops almost immediately once the shoulder joint is back in place.

01. October 2018 · Comments Off on Texas billionaires put gates on popular Forest Service road near Boise · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands