Sunday morning, October 7th, 2018 was sunny and crisp and had the look of a day for an almost perfect fall ride. The road to the packing area for this ride was still damp from the rain the day before, so no dust, and it had been graded recently so was pretty smooth. By 10:15 all the members who had signed up for the ride where finishing up getting their horses ready and by 10:30 we were heading up the left fork of the road to the gate that allows you to enter the south-west corner of this BLM area.

The gate was open, so we didn’t have to stop and the group spread out to climb up to the top of the first rise. There is no defined trail here, so members were picking their way up the hill side. Shannon, Nancy and two other riders were leading the way and Shannon’s horse wanted to lope up the slope. Shannon tried to slow her to a walk, but instead the mare reversed course and started loping down hill. This lope, turned more buck like and Shannon was pitched face first down the slope. Where she lay not moving. The group sprang into action, with half seeing to Shannon and the others catching her horse and holding the others. The first aid kit was taken off the back of Rob’s saddle and a patient assessment was started. Shannon was awake and aware and was able to tell us what she though was going on. She was able to set up after a bit and indicated she though she might have broken her arm or dislocated her shoulder.Under Shannon’s guidance for the most comfortable position of the arm, we used a down vest rolled up to act as a pillow and place it between her body and her fore arm which she was supporting. We then used her jacket and some vet-rap to fashion a sling. This arrangement allowed Shannon to walk back to the road while other brought her horse. By 12:00 Shannon was on her way to further medical care.  I talked to Shannon at 17:30 Sunday night, and she said that she had dislocated her right shoulder which had been restored to it’s correct location, but she had also damaged some tendon and ligament attachments which would require further medical attention.

The members who continued the ride saw a coyote, hawks, antelope and ten mustangs.

Secure dislocated shoulder, and get patient to a doctor
By Alton Thygerson – BYU

The shoulder is your body’s most mobile joint because it can turn in many directions. But this advantage also makes it easy to dislocate.

A partial dislocation (subluxation) means the head of the upper arm bone (humerus) is partially out of the socket (glenoid). A complete dislocation means it’s all the way out.

Both partial and complete dislocations cause extreme pain and unsteadiness in the shoulder. The shoulder muscles may have spasms from the disruption, and this can make it hurt even more.

Symptoms include swelling, numbness, weakness and bruising. Sometimes a dislocation may tear ligaments or tendons in the shoulder. Once in awhile, the dislocation may damage the nerves. The victim will guard the shoulder and try to protect it by holding the dislocated arm in a fixed position away from the chest wall. The victim is unable to touch the opposite shoulder with the hand on the injured side.

The shoulder joint can dislocate forward, backward or downward. The most common (90 percent) type of shoulder dislocation is when the shoulder slips forward (anterior instability). This means the upper arm bone moved forward and down out of the joint. It may happen when the arm is in a throwing position or held up high over the head, as in kayaking.

So what do you do if you come across someone with a dislocated shoulder?

1. Place an ice pack for about 15 minutes over the injured shoulder. (Unable to do where accident occurred)

2. Give the patient analgesics, such as acetaminophen, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, such as aspirin or ibuprofen, to help reduce pain. (We didn’t, but could have)

3. Stabilize the shoulder against movements by placing a pillow or rolled blankets or towels between the arm and chest to fill the space between the arm and the chest wall. Once the arm is stabilized in this way, the elbow can usually be flexed to 90 degrees without causing further pain. Apply an arm sling to the forearm and wrist to support the weight of the arm. Secure the arm in the sling to the pillow and chest with a swath made either from a folded triangular bandage or a gauze bandage. (We used Shannon’s jacket to secure her arm and shoulder. Leaving the left arm of her jacket in place, we used the right sleeve of the jacket, routed under the right arm pit then looped under her forearm and then attached to itself with vet-rap. A down vest was placed between the arm and her body acting as a pillow and supporting the shoulder. We could have use triangle bandages to also build a sling. Shannon indicated that this was the most comfortable position. Shannon was able to walk down the hill to the road and her truck, when Nancy drove he to medical care)

4. Check the pulse at the wrist for signs of circulation. If there is no pulse, medical care should be sought immediately.

5. Seek medical care. Transport the victim in a sitting or semi-seated position.

If you and the patient are in a remote location and far from medical care, an anterior dislocated shoulder can be put back into place (reduced) if you have proper training. It should NOT be attempted when medical care is near or when proper training is absent.

At the hospital or doctor’s office a doctor will examine the shoulder and may order an X-ray. It’s important for the doctor to know how the dislocation happened. Was it an injury? Has the patient ever dislocated the shoulder before? The doctor will place the ball of the humerus back into the joint socket. This process is called closed reduction. The severe pain stops almost immediately once the shoulder joint is back in place.

31. July 2018 · Comments Off on Ski & Mountain Trauma Conference (Saint Alphonsus) · Categories: Education

Ski & Mountain Trauma Conference (Saint Alphonsus)
Thursday-Saturday, November 1-3, 2018
Sun Valley Resort,   WEBSITE
If you are an EMT, paramedic, member of a search and rescue team, ski patrol or just love wilderness medicine and rescue—this is your conference! Hands-on simulation, workshops, advanced climbing, avalanche survival and so much more are sure to give your team the latest education and techniques to handle any patient situation in the remote wilderness.   Agenda

The conference will provide breakfast on Friday and Saturday as well as lunch on Friday.  See you in November!

13. May 2018 · Comments Off on Sawyer Safety Workshop – 2018 · Categories: Education


On Saturday, May 12, 2018 Squaw Butte members Rob Adams, David Benson, Bill Conger, Janine Townsend, Lisa Griffith, Lynn Garner, Shelly Duff, Charles Chick, Chris & Bill Holt, Nancy Smith, Shannon Schantz, Luigina Klein and Phil Ryan participated in a Sawyer Safety Workshop. Charlie Jarvis, Supervisor of the Boise Nation Forest Northern Trail Crew, and Jascha Zeitlin, recreation manager for the western Payette National Forest attended, providing insight and great information in addition to the material covered from the Back Country Horseman of Oregon Sawyer Certification program.  Rob Adams & Charles Chick acted as workshop facilitators and all who attended felt the day was very worthwhile.  Video’s and materials used in this workshop are available on the chapter training page of the website.

04. May 2018 · Comments Off on Idaho State Brand Inspector – 2018 · Categories: Education

Link to Idaho State Brand Inspector      // Idaho Brand Request Form:    AppforRecordingBrand

Cody.Burlile@isp.idaho.gov     To Schedule a Brand Inspection Call: 208 459-4231 (Caldwell Office)

L&H Branding Irons

Texas Freeze Brands

29. April 2018 · Comments Off on Squaw Butte’s Woman Packing Clinic · Categories: Current Events, Education

On April 28, 2018 the “Git R Done” team of Janine Townsend, Janelle Weeks, Shelly Duff and Kelly Ragland, lead by Lisa Griffith planned and executed one of the best clinics that Squaw Butte has ever hosted. They arranged for guest Speakers farrier Joe Prince and Vet Daniel Dombroski to do presentation.  They arranged for a Hot Dog truck to be on site for Lunch and they spent hours working on presentations for a woman centrist packing clinic.  They divided the clinic up into four segments.  
 The first was Joe Prince’s presentation on what to do if you loose a shoe in the back country.  Participants asked lots of good questions and Lisa horse did a great job modeling her hoofs.The second segments was lead by Janine Townsend and was a quick but fact filled discussion of packing and tips and techniques. During Janine’s talk the rest of the team demonstrated items she was covering.

After their presentation, a lunch break allow participants to digest what they had learned and some of the best hot dogs I have had out side of a ball park.  After lunch three demonstration stations were set up and Marybeth Conger and Rob Adams assisted the rest of the team doing hands on demonstrations and answering lots of great questions.

Marybeth demonstrates how to manty up a body, a skill luckily,  I have never had to practice. Her presentation had every one at her station in stitches.

The final segment of the day was an “On the Trail” question and answer session with Dr. Dan and equine radiologist Dana Neelis.  The Vets covered what they think should be in our saddle bags to do on the trail first aid for our stock, what to look for and how to start treatment before we can get them to a vet.

If you attended this clinic you spend a fun and information packed day and left a bit over whelmed but raring to go try some of the things you saw demonstrated or got a chance to try yourself. If you missed this one, hopefully this team of woman will hold another one in the future!  More Pictures

22. April 2018 · Comments Off on Wilderness First Aid & CPR Course 2018 · Categories: Education

On Saturday April 21, 2018 members of Squaw Butte spent a full day with members of the Bogus Basin Ski Patrol lead by chief instructor Karen Alfonso-King in a full day of Wilderness first aid and CPR.  While these pictures show us sitting down a watching, most of the day was spend laughing and doing.  It is just hard to be applying a splint or doing an assessment at the same time. All who attended the class left with their first aid knowledge expanded and refreshed and more confidence that should the need arise that they would be able to use their first aid skills to render assistance in the back country or in their back yard.


SAM Splints are one of the simplest and most versatile pieces of first aid equipment available so at least one should be in every outdoor First Aid kit.  A soft, malleable aluminium strip sandwiched in foam, the splints become fairly rigid once formed into a 3D shape, the more complex the shape, the more rigid they become.
Using SAM Splits     SAM Split Video #1  SAM Splint Video #2    Using SAM splints to Maximun Effect
  Detailed description of “STOP the BLEED” Steps
Wilderness First Aid P1 P2 P3 P4  P5 P6  Simulated Accident  Kit 
Evac Helicopter
 LF1  LF2  NOLS
 Medical Emergency Kit  P1  P2
Wilderness First Aid (WFA)  National Outdoor Leadership – NOLS

Suggested books to add to your Wilderness First Aid Library

Blog Wilderness First Aid Library

17. April 2018 · Comments Off on Stop the Bleed! · Categories: Education


Detailed description of Stop the Bleed steps

14. March 2018 · Comments Off on USFS Saw Policy Program Manager Region 1&4 (update) · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

BCHI Members,

Thank you so much for the opportunity to join you, the State Board of Directors and also members of BCHI at your annual state convention! It was great to meet you all and learn more about the great work the chapters are doing throughout Idaho, as well as share information and answer questions about the Forest Service’s saw policy.

I’m always amazed at the dedication and amount of volunteer and partner work that BCH members give – you are all very much appreciated not only for the time and talent you give, but also for your passion for public lands. Thank you!

Here’s some additional follow-up items for everyone:

• The first is a letter from our Regional Forester here in R1 announcing our new Northern Region Wilderness Skills Institute, that will be occurring in Powell, ID the week of May 21-25; additional information is also in this email if folks scroll below. If folks have an interest, I would recommend signing up soon, per the highlighted link below, as I anticipate the sessions will fill up fast.

• The name of the R4 Saw Program Manager is Brian Burbridge and he can be reached at phone: 801-531-5320 or bburbridge@fs.fed.us. I would recommend that local chapters first contact the primary ranger district staff that they work with to see about saw training opportunities locally; if none are available, the district staff can work with/contact Brian to see about setting something up or seeing where trainings are being offered that folks can attend.

• The R1 Saw Program Manager is Todd Wilson. He is working with local ranger districts directly to set up saw trainings so I would recommend that chapters on the Idaho Panhandle and Nez Perce Clearwater NFs work directly with their local unit contacts first or with BCH volunteer sawyers Jerry Lange and Joe Robinson re: setting something up.

o R1 (Northern Region) covers the Idaho Panhandle NF and the Nez Perce Clearwater NF

o R4 (Intermountain Region) covers the Payette, Boise, Salmon Challis, Sawtooth, and Caribou Targee NFs

o It’s important to note that BCH volunteer C level instructor or evaluator sawyers need to coordinate with local FS units to set up cutting areas for training; volunteer sawyers also need a letter of designation from the Regional Saw Program Manager in order to instruct/evaluate. The FS (either FS line officer, Regional Saw Program Manager, or delegated forest/district saw program coordinator) is the “certifying official” who signs the saw card, based on recommendations from the saw evaluators.

• Conservation United (www.conservationinsurance.com or phone (844-559-8336) is the company that, as of a year ago, sounded like they also offered insurance (workers compensation) coverage for volunteer and partner groups using volunteers. They provide insurance coverage for many youth corps groups around the country, including youth corps using veterans engaged in hazardous fuels reduction (i.e., chain saw) work, and they had indicated to me that they also can provide insurance for volunteers. Not sure current status/current policies they offer but folks might want to visit with them to see what they currently offer.

Hope this is helpful for folks. Again, really appreciated being able to share some information on the saw policy and spend some time together. I look forward to seeing you all again soon!

Informal Letter 1 Signature          Saw Policy Key Points – Volunteers and Partners

14. March 2018 · Comments Off on Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute · Categories: Education

Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute

Apply to attend the 2018 Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute!

Where: Powell Ranger Station, Powell, Idaho

When: May 21, 2018 – May 25, 2018

What: A skills building opportunity for wilderness field staff.

How: Select a Track (1, 2, 3, 4 or 5) and a lodging option below and click on the Apply Now button to be taken to registration.

Deadline: The application period will close April 9, 2018 at 5:00 pm Mountain Daylight Time.

Questions: Contact Jimmy Gaudry or Heather MacSlarrow with questions.

APPLY NOW

The Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute is for agency staff and partner organizations that work in wilderness.  This week long course offers five levels of training, with plenty of time for networking and growing community in between.

Tracks

The Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute offers 5 tracks, based on your level of experience and the skills you would like to gain.  Due to limited capacity, not every applicant may be able to attend their first choice Track.  Therefore, during the application process, you will identify your top two choices for which Track you would like to be in.  PLEASE NOTE the required pre-requisites for each track, and be prepared to furnish the appropriate documents and certifications when asked.  Information about each Track is as follows:

TRACK ONE:  Advanced Crosscut Saw and Axemanship; and Crosscut Saw and Axe Train the Trainer Course

PRE-REQUISITE: Letter of recommendation from line officer (agency staff) or direct supervisor (partner organizations).

Participants will learn policy, vernacular, OSHA requirements, delegations and designations as well as other requirements for navigating saw policy.  They will also learn about the new curriculum, new teaching aids, new methodologies and processes for saw training (1/2 day).  There will then be a field focus on axemanship, complex and precision falling, OHLEC, complex bucking, removing hung trees (with and without rigging) and following the new education methodology (1.5 days).  The newly certified educators will the put on a class for new sawyers (2 days).

TRACK TWO: Crosscut Saw B Bucking and First Aid/CPR

PRE-REQUISITE: None.

This session is focused on gaining the qualifications needed to be a crosscut saw B bucker.  Participants will also learn basic wilderness stewardship principles, leave no trace, horsemanship, and trail maintenance techniques.

The first aid/cpr session will provide participants with basic first aid and CPR skills required to work with a crosscut saw. 

The A/B Crosscut Certification Course provides students with both classroom-based instruction and field experience in the use of the crosscut saws and axes. Students will learn how to safely utilize these tools in a trail maintenance capacity. The course will cover tool history, best practices in the field, one-on-one instruction in tool use in the field, tool care, safety, and transportation of the tools. Successful completion of this course is required to use these tools on national forest lands while participating in stewardship efforts.

Participants will also learn/review basic wilderness stewardship principles, leave no trace, horsemanship, and trail maintenance techniques. 

This is a field based course so come with appropriate outdoor gear and a sack lunch both days.  If you have a favorite set of tools please bring those as well.

TRACK THREE: Crosscut Saw B Bucking and Basic Trail Maintenance

PRE-REQUISITE: First Aid/CPR Card.

This session is focused on gaining the qualifications needed to be a crosscut saw B bucker.  Participants will also learn basic wilderness stewardship principles, leave no trace, horsemanship, and trail maintenance techniques.

The basic trail maintenance session will provide…

The A/B Crosscut Certification Course provides students with both classroom-based instruction and field experience in the use of the crosscut saws and axes. Students will learn how to safely utilize these tools in a trail maintenance capacity. The course will cover tool history, best practices in the field, one-on-one instruction in tool use in the field, tool care, safety, and transportation of the tools. Successful completion of this course is required to use these tools on national forest lands while participating in stewardship efforts.

Participants will also learn/review basic wilderness stewardship principles, leave no trace, horsemanship, and trail maintenance techniques. 

This is a field based course so come with appropriate outdoor gear and a sack lunch both days.  If you have a favorite set of tools please bring those as well. 

TRACK FOUR: Beginner/Intermediate Wilderness Stewardship

PRE-REQUISITE: None.

This session will focus on the skills needed to be a wilderness ranger.  It will provide learning and engagement opportunities for a beginner to intermediate participants.  This session will include fundamentals related to the wilderness act and wilderness character monitoring.  Basic wilderness stewardship principles, roles of the wilderness ranger, making public contacts, backpacking skills, leave no trace, horsemanship, and trail maintenance techniques will also be a part of the session. 

TRACK FIVE:  Intermediate/Advanced Wilderness Stewardship

PRE-REQUISITE: None.

This session will focus on the skills needed to be a wilderness ranger.  It will provide learning opportunities for the intermediate/advanced participants.  A deeper dive into wilderness policy and law, wilderness stewardship performance, and wilderness character monitoring will be included.  It will also allow participants to take on thought provoking topics related to emerging issues, volunteer project management, and minimum requirements decision guides.  Since this is a more advanced session the participants may be asked to lead a session or discussion. 

Lodging

There are two types of lodging available – tent camping (nestled amongst the pines and under the stars on the banks of the Wild and Scenic Lochsa River), or indoor bunkhouse style lodging.  There are a limited number of indoor spaces.  Please state your preference when submitting your application, and tell us about any special accomodations you may need.

Food

Food is not provided.  It will be up to each participant or participant group to furnish their own food.  There is limited indoor cooking space, as well as outside areas suitable for camp stoves, grills, and fires.

What to Bring, How to Get There, and More Information

An informational packet will be mailed to all participants at least two weeks prior to the start of the Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute that lines out what to bring, how to get to training, and more important information.

Timeline

Application Period: March 9, 2018 – April 9, 2018

Application Review: April 9, 2018 – April 22, 2018

Applicant Notification: April 23, 2018

Informational Packet E-Mailed to Participants: May 7, 2018

Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute: May 21, 2018 – May 25, 2018

APPLY NOW

===========================================

Subject: Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute – Applications Due by April 9

Please share with employees and partners.  See link for more information.

The Northern Region will host the Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute (NRWSI) in cooperation with partners from across the Region. The dates for the NRWSI will be May 21 – 25, and it will be held at the historic Powell Ranger Station in Powell, Idaho.

This training is open to all Forest Service employees and partners. There may be a need to limit the number of participants in each session. Applying early is highly encouraged.

Applications may be submitted until April 9, 2018. A description of the sessions are offered along with application information can be found at Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute.

For information concerning the NRWSI, contact Jimmy Gaudry at jcgaudry@fs.fed.us, Kent Wellner at kwellner@fs.fed.us, or Joni Packard at jpackard@fs.fed.us.

15. January 2018 · Comments Off on 2018 is on target to be a fun and educational year for interested Back Country Horseman of Idaho (BCHI) members · Categories: Around The Campfire, Education

By Education Chair Marybeth Conger


If you are still thinking about attending the Back Country Horseman of Idaho 2018 Directors meeting and Annual convention, please consider that chapter member education has been added to this amazing event. On Saturday March 10, the first ever, BCHI chapter training will be held in the afternoon. Presented by various volunteers, these educational workshops and presentations are open for all members to attend. What a great way to learn more about your current chapter position, or find out details about something you may be interested in the future. Some workshops even cover topics to help us better understand things and help BCHI grow in both numbers and membership development. With your attendance and feedback, we can make this training an annual BCHI event and improve, meeting your educational needs. Get your registration form completed and experience some fun learnings and comradery in additional to all of the other fantastic activities scheduled at the 2018 convention. Hope to see you all there!

April 13 – 15 marks the date for the 2018 Idaho Horse Expo held at the Ford Idaho Park. SBBCH members Bill and Marybeth Conger are some of the clinicians at this year’s event. Their pretentions will cover lightweight recreational packing and camping techniques. In addition, local BCH chapters will again man a BCHI booth. These types of public outreach events help the BCHI organization to grow and educate the public on the wise and sustaining use of our backcountry resource. So come join us if you can!

Karen Kimball graciously volunteered to be a BCHI education co-chair to help coordinate education efforts up north. Making sure chapter education chairs are familiar with all of the relevant education materials maintained by BCHA and its member states is one way for her to accomplish this. Thank you Karen!

Please let the education team know what you plan to accomplish in 2018 so we can spotlight more chapter activities. Education updates on the BCHI website are starting to happen and expect to see more once Marybeth successfully completes the Master Educator course. Well this covers the first quarter and then some. Happy Trails!

08. January 2018 · Comments Off on CPR – 2017 Guidelines · Categories: Education

2017 Guideline for CPR – American Heart Association

11. December 2017 · Comments Off on Trail Riding – Understanding Horses and Mules · Categories: Education, Fun Rides

From: Equestrian Design Guidebook for Trails, Trailheads and Campgrounds

USDA Forest Service logo Back | Next – Return to TOC Forest Service Technology & Development logo

Understanding Horses and Mules

In addition to the usual planning considerations, equestrian recreation trails and facilities require attention to the behavior and physical characteristics of horses and mules. The success of horse trails and recreation sites depends on how well planners and designers understand these animals.

An Evolutionary Perspective

Essentially, horses and their kin are prey animals. They developed behavior patterns and physical characteristics over millions of years spent in wide open spaces. Flight is their primary defense. They use their strength, stamina, agility, and speed to escape predators, notably large cats–such as cougars–and wild dogs–such as dingos. Horses and mules constantly monitor their surroundings and are always aware of available escape routes. They may become nervous when routes are narrow or blocked. Horses and mules also prefer to see what they hear or smell.

The Startle Factor

What frightens horses and mules is not always obvious. Anything that moves suddenly or makes an unexpected noise can rouse an animal’s survival instincts and prime it to bolt. This natural reaction–often referred to as a startle reflex–is the result of remarkably acute senses.

Horses and mules have excellent vision, hearing, and tactile senses. They are even capable of feeling vibrations through their hoofs, which often alert them to others long before the rider becomes aware. Horses and mules need a comfortable operating space. When they can see something suspicious from afar, they can more easily evaluate the danger and react accordingly. There is a fine line between what is comfortable for horses and mules and what seems dangerous.

In addition to confined spaces and predators, things that can startle a horse or mule include:

  • Loud or unexpected noises–Buzzing model airplanes, exploding firecrackers, batting practice, or a falling tree
  • Quick or unexpected movements–Fast-moving bicycles, inquisitive children, running animals, or birds rustling in the underbrush
  • Things in unusual combinations–Hikers with large backpacks or vehicles with strange loads
  • Highly contrasting or reflective surfaces–A light colored tread near dark soil, freshly cut logs, black or white rocks, or a manmade object in a natural setting
  • Unfamiliar situations–Activity at a golf driving range or a train nearby
  • Wild or unfamiliar domestic animals–Mountain lions, moose, emus, pigs, or llamas (figure 1-3) Narrow or constricted spaces–Bridges, gates, or tight passages
  • Unexpected trail obstacles–Litter, fallen trees, or boulders

Photo of a family with two llamas being used as pack animals.
Figure 1-3–Anything that appears suddenly, makes an unexpected noise, or is unfamiliar engages a horse’s survival instincts. On the trail,
horses and mules are particularly wary of llamas, hikers with bulky backpacks, and bicycles.

So, what happens when horses and mules are startled? They have a range of responses, from remaining calm to becoming severely frightened. The more conditioned the animal is to uncomfortable situations, the more likely its response will be subdued. When something makes it nervous, an animal may dance around, inadvertently step on things, or balk. Horses or mules that are severely unnerved may run, jump, spin, or do a creative combination of all these things. When horses and mules feel the need to protect themselves, they may kick, bite, or strike. Experienced riders can hold a well-trained animal in check under most circumstances. There is a point, though, where a stimulus becomes so great that even the best conditioning will not override the animal’s innate fight-or-flight instincts.

Trail stock–especially mules–have highly developed memories for pleasure, pain, fear, people, and places. Many trail animals recognize a previously visited location or trail route (figure 1-4). Once a horse or mule has had a particularly unpleasant or painful experience, the animal will try to avoid that location, condition, or object forever. Recreationists in many areas minimize potential conflicts by practicing trail etiquette that favors needs of horses and mules. Chapter 12– Providing Signs and Public Information lists ways to communicate a trail animal’s needs to other trail users.

Photo of a horse and rider looking over a mountainous landscape.
Figure 1-4–Horses and mules have excellent memories and can easily retrace routes they have traveled in the past. They avoid areas they associate with unpleasant experiences.

11. December 2017 · Comments Off on Interested in becoming a SBFC Wilderness Ranger? · Categories: Current Events, Education

2018 Wilderness Ranger Internship

Overview

The goals of the SBFC Wilderness Ranger Intern (WRI) program are to train, educate, mentor and provide employment development opportunities for the next generations of wilderness professionals and provide skilled support to the Forest Service for accomplishing priority wilderness work.

This is a 14-week internship for military veterans and college students doing under-graduate or graduate work in conservation, resource management, wilderness, recreation or related fields.  The internship offers 2 full weeks of wilderness skills training—crosscut saw use and certification, hand tool use, stock handling and packing, Leave No Trace and Wilderness First Responder training, followed by 12 weeks working in the Selway-Bitterroot and Frank Church Wilderness areas, with trained wilderness professionals, US Forest Service managers and volunteers.

The WRI will also learn about the Wilderness Act and how it established an overarching framework for wilderness stewardship, what wilderness character is and how to conduct wilderness character monitoring.

In 2018, WRIs will receive an AmeriCorps award.

The application will close on February 16, 2018 at 5pm MST.              Apply Now!

01. November 2017 · Comments Off on In Case of Emergency – ICE · Categories: Around The Campfire, Education

I teach Emergency Preparedness for horse and mule riders at equine events across the country and it’s amazing how many people don’t think about equine identification.Fortunately, Sierra View Ranch has thought about the topic. A lot. Their line of “In Case of Emergency” or I.C.E. products (including the I.C.E. Halter, I.C.E. Clip-on tag. I.C.E. UltraLite, and the ManeStay) has been created with one goal in mind. To help reunite you and your animal in case a ride becomes “eventful”.

The beauty of all I.C.E. products is in the highly visible “I.C.E. INFO INSIDE” tag that opens to reveal info on the animal. These ingenious horse labels are a fabulous way to keep your contact information on your animal in case the two of you become separated.

You can learn more about these products at the Sierra View Ranch General Store http://www.sierraviewranchgeneralstore.com.

12. October 2017 · Comments Off on Sawyer – Hung up tree awareness · Categories: Education

Things to consider when making the choice to tackle or walk away from a tree that is hung up
Hung-up-Tree-Awareness 01/24/2007

11. October 2017 · Comments Off on New Sign Up Video · Categories: Around The Campfire, Education


Video Link