Black bears (Ursus americanus) are found throughout both the foothills and forests of Idaho. Between 20,000 and 30,000 black bears roam these wild lands. These bears share space with a human population that is expected to grow by more than 15 percent during the next 10 years. This means that human/bear encounters will continue and likely increase.

Every year, Idaho Fish and Game Department staff respond to dozens of calls from citizens reporting bears that have become become attracted to — and then accustomed to — human food sources such as garbage, bird seed, and pet food. Though the bears are just following their sensitive noses to high-calorie foods, being in constant contact with people can cause them to lose their natural wariness of humans. Bears intent on getting a good meal can cause harm to someone who gets in their way. For this reason, Fish and Game staff are regularly forced to euthanize some bears that have become too comfortable around people. That’s treating the symptom, not the cause of the problem.
Idaho’s mountain towns are a great place for humans, but why do bears like them so much?

Bears spend approximately one-third of the year in their den, sleeping through winter. To prepare for this, they spend most of their time during summer and fall fattening up by consuming as many calories as possible.

Contrary to popular belief, more than 90 percent of most black bear diets consist of vegetation: berries, nuts and plants. A bear’s keen nose can smell foods up to five miles away!

Bear Country
How To be Safe Around Bears

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Facebook Pages:           Treasure Valley                      Squaw Butte

This morning, as per the Foundation meeting last evening, I created a post on the Treasure Valley Back Country Horsemen of Idaho FaceBook site about the BCHI Foundation and SmileAmazon. At this point, I’ve texted someone at the following chapters asking them to “Share” the TVBCHI Foundation post to their FaceBook sites: (it is the first post TVBCHI FaceBook site): Eagle Rock, Cache Peak, Portneuf River, Squaw Butte, Priest River Valley, Selkirk, and Twin Rivers. I could not find an active site for the other chapters. However, if I’ve missed a chapter, please bring the post up in FaceBook and share to your FB sites.
Thank you,
Alice Millington
Foundation Secretary
208-475-4107

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VISIT WEB SITE

PDF:COVID-19 USFS 2020-03-28       VISIT WEB SITE

VISIT WEB SITE

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Video-1                 Video-2
The battery-powered STIHL GTA 26 garden pruner is an innovative, versatile cutting tool for garden owners and will begin shipping in late 2019. The 10-centimeter guide bar and chain prunes small-diameter branches and cuts square and round timber. The tool is supplied with energy by a replaceable 10.8V rechargeable battery and is part of the new STIHL AS cordless system for private land and garden maintenance. This system also includes the new STIHL HSA 26 cordless shrub and grass shears which will be on the market in February 2020.

Video
Swedish Homestead
182K subscribers
We got our hands on Stihl’s smallest professional chainsaw, the MS201C. It is a light weight but yet powerful saw meant for smaller tasks like thinning young forests and cutting firewood. Here is what we though about it.

Check out our other reviews:

Stihl MS462: https://youtu.be/6XJSekItbUQ
Husqvarna 572XP: https://youtu.be/Ge-LQ-MLJ_k

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Watch Video

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While falling a dangerous tree, a faller was struck by its top section and fatally injured. The tree was severely decayed, causing it to be unstable and to fall in an unintended direction.
Watch Video

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Read More

Read More

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overview-national-trail-strategy

10YTCOverview-508                                 10YTCLaunchLearn-508

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READ MORE

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READ the Whole Story: solar power for your trailer

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27. February 2020 · Comments Off on Education – Wilderness First Aid Workshop 2020 · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

FirstAid-flyer

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27. February 2020 · Comments Off on BCHI – Sportsmen Show Flyer · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

BCHIflyer2020

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27. February 2020 · Comments Off on BCHI Clinic – Camping with stock on public Lands · Categories: Education

Clinic Handout – April 2020

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27. February 2020 · Comments Off on Forest Service Saw Training – May 2020 · Categories: Education

Sawyer Training Handout – 2020

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26. February 2020 · Comments Off on Tawnya Brummett selected as Forest Supervisor for Boise National Forest · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

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25. February 2020 · Comments Off on Celebration Park Fun Ride – February 23, 2020 · Categories: Fun Rides

Situated along the Snake River, Celebration Park was established as Idaho’s only archaeological park in 1989. A walk through the huge basalt melon gravels deposited by the Bonneville flood reveals petroglyphs 100 to 10,000 years old. Visitors learn about the Paleolithic and Archaic lifeways and enjoy throwing a dart with an atlatl. Experience a walking tour of historic Guffey Railroad Bridge and be captivated by southwest Idaho’s early mining and railroad history. Archaeological sites are protected by state and federal law. Please be respectful of Celebration Park’s unique archaeology and cultural heritage. Celebration Park is on the western border of the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area (NCA), which is managed by the Bureau of Land Management. For NCA visitor information, visit their website. The Snake River Islands near Celebration Park are part of the Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge’s Snake River Islands Unit. Visit their website for information on rules and regulations, and habitat management practices on the islands. Video On a gray and breezy Sunday morning, members & friends of Back Country Horsemen of Idaho Squaw Butte Chapter meet at the trailer parking area of Celebration Park along the Snake River.  The weatherman had promised a nice day for a ride, but at 10:00 people were skeptical.  The  group  numbering  over 25, broke into two teams and when they were ready rode a 10 mile loop following the cliffs while heading east and the river back west to the trailers As the day progressed the weather improved the sky turned blue and when we were all back at the trailers was darn right nice. After taking care of the stock, finger snakes were broken out and everyone enjoy both the fare and the conversation.

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19. February 2020 · Comments Off on HR 5797- Immediate Action Needed by All Trail Enthusiasts! · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

READ MORE

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15. February 2020 · Comments Off on Field Notes 02/14/2020 – National Wilderness Stewardship Alliance · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Hike the Hill

This week was the annual gathering of the national scenic and historic trail community in DC to educate Congress, meet with agencies, and build support for trails.  NWSA was there along with Back Country Horsemen and other Wilderness groups to lend our voice and to expand opportunities for wilderness stewardship.

We are happy to report that the Forest Service Chief took this opportunity to express her full support for Shared Stewardship and to renew the NFS Trail Stewardship Partner funding for $200,000 in 2020.  Find more details here.

This is in addition to the $200,000 already secured for Wilderness Stewardship Performance activities.

Applications for both programs are due by March 30th.

Webinars

Tuesday, March 10 at 1:00 PM Mountain

Leave No Trace  — Refresher, Updates, Resources

Erin Collier, Brice Esplin, and Faith Overall

What’s new with Leave No Trace, and how can you incorporate the principles into your daily work?  Erin Collier & Brice Esplin, Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers, will provide a general Leave No Trace refresher with an emphasis on updates, research, and resources, geared toward wilderness stewardship groups and agency partners. Faith Overall, Leave No Trace’s Education and Outreach coordinator and volunteer for the Indian Peaks Wilderness Alliance will also join to provide a volunteer perspective and answer questions on getting more involved.

Register Here

Wilderness Workshop Presentations and Videos

Many presentations at the Workshop are posted on the WORKSHOP PAGE .  You can also find the Program and Abstracts.  Several of the main sessions were video taped and as soon as they are available will be placed on this page as well.  The Final Plenary session and Derick Lugo’s Closing Presentation are now available online.

The 2020 Funding Program Application Periods are Open

As noted above NWSA has two funding programs for wilderness stewards.

The Wilderness Stewardship Performance Partner Funding and

The National Forest System Trail Stewardship Partner Funding.

Both application periods will end March 30, 2020.

Now is the time to renew your memberships for 2020.  WSP Funding requires a NWSA membership in order to apply.

Renew NOW

In other Member News:  Memberships will now track calendar years.  Memberships renewals for 2020 began October 1st and are good for the entire calendar year 2020.  Participate in Funding programs, get discounts to the National Wilderness Workshop and keep informed about national issues affecting wilderness stewardship.

Forest Service WSP Webinars now Posted

The latest WSP webinars are posted on Wilderness Connect.  The webinars include the Plants element and Recreation Sites element.

These webinars can be found at the link below, along with the nine other WSP elements already posted and of course the other outstanding past and planned webinars by the Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center, Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, and other great partners.

https://wilderness.net/practitioners/training/free-webinars/default.php

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TAKE ACTION: SUPPORT PUBLIC LAND ACCESS NOW!

The time is here to add your voice in support of public access. The Public Access Protection Act (PAPA) was assigned a bill number and awaits introduction. Now, Senate leadership decides whether to allow the bill an introduction, opening the bill for public support or criticism.

If you support protecting public access, Senators Winder, Vick, Hill, and Heider need to hear from you- that you support PAPA and want a public introduction of S1317 in the Senate Resources Committee by February 26th. Enter your name on the form below to ask our state leadership to protect access to your public lands.

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12. February 2020 · Comments Off on BCHA Update – 23rd Annual Hike the Hill in Washington DC · Categories: BCHI /BCHA


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08. February 2020 · Comments Off on Idaho parks department eyes voluntary trail pass program. · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Idaho Trails Supporter Fact Sheet

Hey Folks – I have attached the fact sheet for our voluntary sticker program. The short – The voluntary sticker (or pass) is a $10 minimum donation available to the public on June 6th, National trails day. They will be primarily available online.

Thanks!

Tom Helmer
Non-Motorized Trails Program Manager
5657 Warm Springs Ave|Boise, ID 83716
tel (208) 514-2419 | mobile (208) 914-4821

**************************************************************************************
February 07, 2020
BOISE, Idaho

The director of the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation said Friday that his agency is starting a voluntary trail pass program as part of a long-range goal to raise awareness and eventually money for non-motorized trail maintenance.

David Langhorst told the Legislature’s budget-setting committee that interest in the 900-mile (1,450-kilometer) Idaho Centennial Trail has been growing.

He said motorized trail groups have been effective in persuading lawmakers to tax or place fees on those user groups for trail maintenance.

But he said non-motorized trail users have been somewhat resistant to those kinds of user fees. He said the voluntary trail pass could help change minds.

Read more here: https://www.sacbee.com/news/business/article240081138.html#storylink=cpy
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06. February 2020 · Comments Off on Air Saint Luke’s Smart Phone App · Categories: Around The Campfire

Air Saint Luke’s Membership

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04. February 2020 · Comments Off on Trail Meister – What’s should be in your Personal first Aid Kit · Categories: Education

READ MORE

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04. February 2020 · Comments Off on IWF – Sportsman Legislative Voting Record · Categories: Education, Public Lands

READ MORE

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04. February 2020 · Comments Off on Wilderness Alliance – Managing for Multiple Mandates · Categories: Education, Public Lands

Link to full webinar

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18. January 2020 · Comments Off on Wilderness Stewardship – Partnering for Success · Categories: BCHI /BCHA


See Full Presentation

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17. January 2020 · Comments Off on BCHA Looks Back on a Successful 2019 · Categories: Around The Campfire, BCHI /BCHA

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17. January 2020 · Comments Off on Speak Up for Salmon · Categories: Current Events

If you’ve been looking for an opportunity to speak up for salmon, steelhead, and Idaho’s river communities, here’s an excellent opportunity!

This Friday, January 17th, the Governor’s Salmon Workgroup will hold a public comment period from 5-7pm in the Lincoln Auditorium at the State House in Boise: 700 W Jefferson St. Anyone is welcome to sit in on the meeting or sign up to give public testimony, and each individual will be allotted 3 minutes. We hope to see you there!

On Saturday, the group will meet at the University of Idaho Boise Water Center to conduct a group meeting amongst Workgroup members. The public is also invited to sit in on this meeting.

As a reminder, IWF is a member of the Workgroup and sits alongside a diverse group of stakeholders that represent varying interests throughout Idaho and the region.

You can find the full meeting agenda for both days here.

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16. January 2020 · Comments Off on Catrock Ventures – SBFC · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

This past summer… a group of high school students traveled from the Bronx, NY (a borough of New York City) to the back country of Idaho.

Can you imagine?

They were enrolled in a program called Catrock Ventures… and worked with the SBFC to clear 5 miles of trail, experience life in the wilderness, and learn Wilderness skills.

Click here to view a short video of their amazing journey!!

Catrock Venture’s mission is to reach, inspire, and empower low-income youth to become socially responsible change-makers.

Many of these kids have never been away from their neighborhoods in the Bronx… much less the state of New York.

The opportunity to experience some of the most wild places in America is truly a life-changing experience for them.

And we support their efforts…

We need our youth… all of them… to become stewards of our wild places. And help preserve wilderness areas for everyone to enjoy today… and far into the future.

I hope you enjoy the video.

All the best,  Sally   Selwaybitterroot.org

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15. January 2020 · Comments Off on The Crosscut Saw Filer – Videos · Categories: Education

Watch all 5 Videos

This is Part 1 of 5 of the Crosscut Saw Filer. Warren Miller, author of the Crosscut Saw Manual, learned to file crosscut saws from Martin Winters, accomplished filer from the days when the crosscut saw reigned. Warren began filing saws in the 1970s and continues to pass on his knowledge at saw filing workshops today. USDA Forest Service, Missoula Technology and Development Center, 1123-2D03-MTDC.

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14. January 2020 · Comments Off on Wilderness Connect For Practitioners · Categories: Education, Public Lands

Traditional Tools & Skills

Information provided in this toolbox is intended to support the use of Traditional Tools and Skills for administrative activities in wilderness. A process for determining the minimum requirement and minimum tool is described and information and training resources are provided. The toolbox features sections on common traditional tools (i.e. saws, axes, rigging, grip hoists, rock tools, etc.), travel methods (i.e. livestock, watercraft, sled dogs, etc.), and project examples (i.e. trails, weeds, etc.). To suggest new materials for inclusion, email Lisa Ronald at lisa@wilderness.net. Date of last update: 11/26/2018.

Introduction

Overview

The use of traditional tools and skills (TTS) for necessary administrative activities in wilderness is a basic principle of wilderness stewardship. The basis for this principle is found in the Wilderness Act itself and implemented through agency regulations and policy. The use of TTS or non-motorized tools and methods is directly related to both the purpose and the definition of wilderness as described in the Wilderness Act and agency policy.

Information provided in this toolbox is intended to support the use of TTS for administrative activities in wilderness. The use of TTS is mandated by both the Wilderness Act and agency policy and exceptions are made only when the use of motorized equipment or other prohibited uses are screened through narrow criteria. Comfort, convenience, economic efficiency, and commercial value are not standards of management in wilderness or criteria that are used to screen proposals to use something other than TTS. Assumptions about the use of TTS are often not true and can be overcome. Additional information and a process for making decisions related to use of TTS skills is contained in the Minimum Requirements Decision Guide.

Training and Information Contacts

  • FS Regional Trainers and Information Contacts
  • Ninemile Wildlands Training Center
  • Missoula Technology Development Center Publications
  • Student Conservation Association Traditional Skills Training
  • Lightly on the Land-SCA Trails Manual
  • Volunteer and Partner Training sources
  • FS Regional Blasters Contact List
  • BWCAW Trail and Campsite Maintenance Guide
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14. January 2020 · Comments Off on Wild Spotter – Mapping Invasive Species · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands


You can help fight back against invasive species in America’s wild places by downloading the FREE Wild Spotter Mobile App on your smartphone or other mobile device. You’ll learn how to identify, map, and prevent the spread of these invaders in order to protect our rivers, mountains, forests, and all wild places for future generations. Learn more by watching the Wild Spotter Introduction Video.

Volunteers are a vital part of the Wild Spotter campaign! To become a volunteer, register either online or download the FREE Wild Spotter Mobile App on your smartphone or other mobile device. Once registered, reach out to your nearest National Forest or Grassland to discover how you can volunteer to help support and protect these beautiful places from invasive species. Then, just get outside and enjoy America’s wild places while keeping an eye out for those harmful invaders!  https://wildspotter.org/

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13. January 2020 · Comments Off on BCHI – Chapter Membership Training · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

PDF of Training

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13. January 2020 · Comments Off on Wyoming – Bridger Wilderness · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

About the Bridger Wilderness

The 428,169-acre Bridger Wilderness is located along the Continental Divide on the west slope of the Wind River Range in Wyoming. It was designated a Primitive Area under Department of Agriculture Regulations in 1931, and later made part of the National Wilderness Preservation System with passage of the Wilderness Act in 1964. In 1984, its original 392,169 acres were increased by 36,000 acres when the Wyoming Wilderness Act was signed into law. The Bridger Wilderness is administered by the Pinedale Ranger District of the Bridger-Teton National Forest.
Topography
The intricately faulted Wind River Range is dominated by an igneous and metamorphic core. Enormous compressional forces in the earth thrust the block of granite into the air. The glaciation and erosion that followed carved the range, leaving 13,804 foot Gannet Peak the highest mountain in the Wilderness and in Wyoming.

Glacial action left cirques, kettles, U-shaped valleys, hanging troughs, 1,300 lakes, and left “erratics”, boulders strewn about the lowlands. The sedimentary rocks that once overlay the granitic core of the range have been stripped from the mountains by erosion. Remnants of the sedimentary rocks remain near Green River Lakes.

The Wind River Mountain Range has seven of the ten largest glaciers remaining in the contiguous United States. The Green River originates in the Bridger Wilderness. The Green River joins the Colorado after 1,500 miles and empties into the Gulf of California. The Green River drains most of the west side of the Wind River Range. The Sweetwater River drains the southern end of the range and flows into the Platte River and ultimately the Gulf of Mexico.

Access
US Highway 191, the major highway between Rock Springs and Jackson, Wyoming, lies west of the Wind River Range. Trailheads are reached via roads which are clearly signed at intersections with Highway 191. Both Jackson and Rock Springs have commercial air and bus lines. Pinedale has a paved, non-commercial public airstrip located about 6 miles south of town. Shuttle services between Jackson and Rock Springs, and trailheads, are available from local private businesses.

Trails
There are over 600 miles of trails in the Bridger Wilderness. Most well-used trails are cleared early in the season, but fallen trees may be encountered on secondary trails. Winter snows generally do not leave the high passes and highest trails until mid-July. Stream flows are high and swift during snowmelt runoff in June and July, and some stream crossings can be hazardous. Check at the Pinedale Ranger Station Office, or call them at 307-367-4326, before beginning your Wilderness trip. Books with detailed trail descriptions are available at local sporting good stores and bookstores. MAP
bridger_wilderness_recreational_livestock_application

bridger_wilderness_cover_letter_for_group_permits

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09. January 2020 · Comments Off on 25 year old Cottonwood tree – Removal · Categories: Around The Campfire

Over the summer a 25 year old cotton wood that I planted when we first bought our place in Sweet was looking very poorly, more dead than alive branches. In the fall after the leaves were gone, I gave it a very close look and made arrangements for an arborist to take a look and give me an estimate to remove it that was the right course of action.  Sean McInerney of Boise Tree Service came out in November and agreed that the tree needed to come down before a good wind brought it down.  We sent an appointment for after the holidays and on January 6, 2020 his crew arrived to perform the work.

The tree was ringed by other smaller trees that I wanted to keep and would need to come down in pieces in a controlled fashion. I was interest to see if they would bring a cherry picker or climb.  When they were through, the only thing left was some saw dust, the stump was gone, the branches ground up, the larger pieces load in a trailer. I was very impressed with their sawyer skills and professionalism.

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07. January 2020 · Comments Off on National Crosscut & Chainsaw Program – New Website Active · Categories: Education, Public Lands

Happy New Year! Wanted to make sure you were aware the Forest Service’s National Crosscut and Chainsaw Program webpage is live.  It should hopefully provide a site for you to get all the FS saw information consolidated such as FS Saw Policy, PPE requirements, complexity charts, and the 5 step cutting process.  The new curriculum will be posted here once it becomes finalized.  I look forward to a great 2020 season and hope to see you all at some point this year.  Thanks and please let me know if you have any questions.  Brian Burbridge, Region 4 Saw Program Manager brian.burbridge@usda.gov

Please share widely. If you have comments on the page, please send them to National Saw Program Manager Pete Duncan at pete.duncan@usda.gov

https://www.fs.usda.gov/managing-land/trails/trail-management-tools/national-saw-program

National Saw Program Technical Advisory Group (SPTAG)

The SPTAG is made up of national and regional saw program managers as well as other subject matter experts who provide guidance for consistent implementation of the National Saw Program.

National and regional saw program managers contact information…

Sawyer Training

New crosscut and chainsaw training modules will be available soon. The module-based training focuses on “Developing a Thinking Sawyer” and emphasizes risk management, human factors, and sawyer safety. Forest Service sawyers can still attend approved training courses until the new program is finalized.

Contact your local unit saw program for training opportunities. National and regional training workshop announcements will be added to this page. Check back for updates!

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Wearing the proper PPE is critical when operating a chainsaw or crosscut saw. Follow these guidelines for required PPE when using a saw…

Sawyer Certification Levels

Forest Service employees, volunteers, partners, and cooperators can obtain 4 levels of certification for chainsaw and crosscut saw operation under the new saw policy:

  1. Sawyer trainee
  2. A Sawyer
  3. B Sawyer
  4. C Sawyer

Related Reference Materials

Have a question?

Contact the Forest Service Saw Program at sm.fs.fssawprogram@usda.gov.

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06. January 2020 · Comments Off on SRA – IDPR Grants for 2021- Need support · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands, Work Parties and Projects

January 6, 2020

By Kent May – Trails Supervisor Sawtooth National Recreation Area

For 2021 RTP we are replacing two log boardwalks/puncheon, and removing two others on the Livingston Mill trail (pics attached). The two that are removed, will have the stream crossing hardened with rock to prevent erosion. On top of the infrastructure work, we will be doing 90 miles of heavy maintenance to trails in and accessing the White Clouds Wilderness.

  

Replace these

   

Remove these and harden trail

For 2021 ORMV we are building 25’ of puncheon over a perennial stream on Grand Prize motorized single track trail (pic attached). For this grant there will also be a maintenance component of 100 miles of heavy maintenance to motorized trails, paying special attention to the Grand Prize trail to prevent any motorized encroachment into the Boulder Wilderness.

We are looking for support letters for our 2021 IDPR Grants

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03. January 2020 · Comments Off on Knot of the Month – Prusik Knot · Categories: Education

By Daniel Waugh <tacpdan@gmail.com>

Trailmaster Video               REI Video                      My Best Kite Video

 

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02. January 2020 · Comments Off on Stop-The-Bleed tools for your First Aid Kit · Categories: Around The Campfire, Education

Tourniquet – Life saving equipment – hemorrhaging is the leading cause of preventable death in tactical and non-tactical trauma situations  VIDEO

  • Life saving equipment] – hemorrhaging is the leading cause of preventable death in tactical and non-tactical trauma situations 
  • Patent pending finger hole design for better grip in mud, blood
  • No-curl tip – for the largest patients the no-curl tip resists pealing when matters most
  • Apply a second tourniquet to stop difficult arterial bleeding
  • New gen 3 us made kevlar stitching, aluminum windlass, aggressive teeth pinch buckle prevents strap pealing


QuikClot First Aid Advanced Clotting Sponge

  • QuikClot stops bleeding 3 times faster than blood on its own
  • Tested and proven in years of combat use by the U.S. military
  • Pre-hydrated zeolite clotting agent does not contain botanicals or animal and human proteins
  • Easily conforms to wounds; simply apply the sponge to the source of the bleeding and apply pressure
  • The compact size allows you to add QuikClot to your medical supplies, glove box, or emergency kit
  • VIDEO

ZipStitch Laceration Kit – Surgical Quality Wound Closure  VIDEO

  • WHEN YOU CAN’T STITCH IT, ZIP IT! This product contains the following: 1 ZipStitch device to close minor lacerations up to 1.5”, 1 alcohol wipe to clean the wound area, 1 gauze pad to help control bleeding and 1 bandage to cover and protect the closed wound, supplies for one wound. ZIPSTITCH is only 1.5″ so bring it along for that extra peace of mind in any situation where cuts may occur.
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01. January 2020 · Comments Off on Happy New Year – BCHA · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

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31. December 2019 · Comments Off on BCHI State Board Meeting & Convention · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Current Events

Treasure Valley Chapter – Facebook Page

Information PDF

New Year Greetings to Squaw Butte BCHI Members,

The 2020 BOD Meeting and Convention information and registration form is on the BCHI website on the Activities’ page http://www.bchi.org/activities.htm. Please open it and read through it. There are substantial savings for registering early, rather than later, because we want members who have never attended to join us for the convention: $70 for person and only $120 per couple. Early registrations will be postmarked before March 1st. We are also offering substantial discounts for young attendees, whether members or not, at only $20 per ticket for the dinner/convention. And, we are selling dinner tickets for adults who wish to attend the social hour, dinner, and live auction, only, at $25.

All delegates must pay the full convention registration fee if they are voting delegates, and all BCHI members who attend the convention for the day, regardless if they vote, must pay the full–$70 single, $120 couple (early fees) or $85 per person (after Feb. 29)–registration fee.

We have placed the option of paying only $25 for dinner as a courtesy in the case someone’s travel partner or friend wants to attend dinner. A $25 dinner ticket holder will be allowed in the building at 5:00pm.
We have different fees to allow for flexibility, in the hope that more members will attend. We want all to take advantage of the savings without taking advantage of us and the costs of putting on the convention. (And, though not explained in the website info, part of the fees go to pay for Friday’s meetings.

We have placed a little information about motels and eateries on the site as well. Please note that to get a room at the Best Western Plus Peppertree across the parking lot from the Nampa Civic Center, the venue for the convention, you must click into the Best Western Motel Reservation URL, Best Western Motel Reservation URL ; scroll down to see Backcountry Horsemen discount prices. I believe that the Best Western would only reserve 20 rooms for this function, so log in early. For those who cannot use a computer, we are reserved under Backcountry Horsemen under Group ID #Z81XT6F7.

Please take the time to read through the information on the BCHI website, which may change, slightly, as we near the events. We have three great presentations on Saturday from Madison Seamons (stock care–very entertaining), Cheryl Bice (emergency care), and Alayne Blickel (managing your horse pasture/corral areas)…so get on board and get your registrations in early.

Alice Millington
Treasure Valley BCHI President
McCall, ID
millington0606@gmail.com
208-475-4107

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30. December 2019 · Comments Off on Trail Volunteer Sawyer Certification · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

Every member of a volunteer trail crew who operates a chainsaw or crosscut on public land need to complete USFS sawyer training. This is the same training that USFS seasonal employees are required to complete and is designed to keep the crews safe. In years past this training was only available directly from the USFS, but due to the 2016 Saw Policy revision FSM 2358.05 it is now possible for organizations like Back Country Horsemen members with proper training and endorsements to train Trail Volunteers.
The 2016 National Saw Policy applies to all activities on National Forest System lands (NFS) that involve the use of saws, unless a separate interagency agreement covers that activity. The Forest Service Saw Program provides direction on qualifications, training, evaluation, and certification requirements for Forest Service employees, volunteers, Training Consultants, and cooperators using saws on NFS lands.

A Sawyer. An apprentice sawyer who may saw only in the least complex situations or, for training purposes, at the next higher level and in either case only under the immediate supervision of a B or C Sawyer qualified to supervise the work.

B Sawyer ̶ Bucking Only An intermediate Sawyer who may independently buck and limb any size material in moderately complex situations within the restrictions noted on the sawyer’s National Sawyer Certification Card and who may saw at the next higher level, but only under the immediate supervision of a sawyer qualified to supervise the work.

C Sawyer ̶ Bucking Only An advanced sawyer who may independently buck and limb any size material in highly complex situations based on the Regional Saw Program Manager’s or Saw Program Coordinator’s written recommendation, which must be supported by demonstrated advanced saw knowledge and skills and, in most cases, certification as a B Sawyer (FSM 2358.1, ex. 02); who may conduct classroom and field training within their skill level for A and B Sawyers; and who may conduct field proficiency evaluations within their skill level for A Sawyers and B Sawyers ̶ Bucking Only

Back Country Horsemen of Idaho has a number of members who have completed the required training, have the experience and required endorsements and have been conducting classes working in partnership with the USFS in region 1 and 4.

Certification need to be renewed every three years, so if your certification card has expired or doesn’t look like this, you need to attend a sawyer workshop in 2020. Contact one of the Sawyer instructors listed above to learn about a training opportunity near by.

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25. December 2019 · Comments Off on Wilderness Volunteers – Blog · Categories: Public Lands

Equipment Spotlight: Adventure Medical Kits Ultralight Watertight PRO

Over the last 19 years I’ve led nearly 40 week-long service projects with Wilderness Volunteers in public lands all over the United States. I’ve used a number of different first aid kits to deal with scrapes, cuts, blisters, etc. over this time but hands down my current favorite is the Ultralight Watertight PRO from Adventure Medical Kits.
The exterior yellow rip-stop nylon zippered bag helps keep the contents dry even when working in rainy and wet conditions. The interior bags (3 Super stretch DryFlex™ bags and 1 smaller rip-stop nylon bag) make doubly sure the kit contents stay dry while still being lightweight (~⅓-½ oz), and durable. (Having opened up kits before for a bandage only to find the paper soaked I can’t say how much I appreciate medical kits that keep the insides dry even when your backpack gets wet.)

Keep It Clean: On The Importance of Cleaning Your Gear

One of the most important (and likely most forgotten) parts of being a responsible outdoor adventurer is cleaning your gear before and after each adventure.

While exploring our nation’s wild lands helps us gain appreciation for them it can also put them in added danger. Invasive weeds, insects, and diseases can be introduced to new areas via shoes, clothing, camping gear, boats, vehicles, firewood, etc.

INTERN BLOG SERIES: A Necessity Not My Own

BY ALIX SCHOBACK // 2019 WILDERNESS VOLUNTEERS INTERN

“So you’re paying an organization to go do manual labor for a week? Shouldn’t they be paying you?” 

The words of my grandpa, who had been fairly confused about my summer internship with Wilderness Volunteers, echoed in my head. I sat on a rock beside the trail we were working on in the Sawtooth Wilderness; we were three miles from our destination of the wilderness boundary, and 5 miles from our camp at McGown Lakes. I looked out at the mountainside across from me, littered with dead trees — some strewn across the ground, some still upright — from a ten-year-old burn. My tool of choice for the day, a grubhoe, lay at my feet. 

It was the fourth day of our project, and I had already hiked nearly forty miles. In all honesty, I was exhausted. Consequently, I was frustrated with myself. This was supposed to be what I loved, what I cared about — work I considered to be of the utmost importance. Still, for a second, my grandpa’s words resonated with me. I felt the slightest sense of injustice, then shame for allowing the emotion to even enter my head.

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22. December 2019 · Comments Off on National Wilderness Stewardship Alliance · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

Link to Website
For Back Country Horsemen of Oregon Demonstrations BCHA Demonstrations

Randy Rasmussen, BCHA   Partnering for Generational Stewardship of Wilderness

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17. December 2019 · Comments Off on Cleaning a Saddle with Ground in Dirt & Other Cool Stuff · Categories: Around The Campfire

Cleaning a Saddle with Ground in Dirt

Leather Mystery Braid Cuff

Eye splice in double braid polyester rope

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16. December 2019 · Comments Off on BCHA – Video · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

2019 is coming to a close. Thank you for your membership and dedication to BCHA.
We understand this is a busy time of year. You can exponentially impact our efforts by fundraising on behalf of BCHA. Create a Facebook fundraiser, refer a friend, gift a membership; becoming a fundraiser ensures we can continue reaching oth
ers and enabling great work like this to continue.

Thank you for believing in our mission and supporting our efforts of keeping trails open for you.

Check out the BCH Work Party Video from Umatilla, WA

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13. December 2019 · Comments Off on 2019 ITA Wrap-Up · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

Click on each section to read the complete story

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13. December 2019 · Comments Off on Idaho Rangeland Resources Commission · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Idaho Rangeland Resources Commission 
2019-IRRC-Annual-Report

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13. December 2019 · Comments Off on SBFC Fall Newsletter 2019 · Categories: Education, Public Lands

Click to View Newsletter Link to Website

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12. December 2019 · Comments Off on Life Flight (Saint Al’s & Saint Luke’s) <> All BCHI members should belong to one of the organizations! · Categories: Around The Campfire

https://www.stlukesonline.org/health-services/specialties/programs/air-st-lukes-membership

Air Reciprocal Programs

As of April 1st, 2018

Whether in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Wyoming, western Montana, northern Nevada, or northern California, you may be covered if transported by a reciprocal partner, subject to the reciprocating program’s membership rules. Life Flight Network’s reciprocal partners include:

https://www.lifeflight.org/membership/

Air St. Luke’s – Back Country Horsemen of Idaho        FAQ AIR-253 082418      Life Flight Application Form

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