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Hi, All –

If you have been in touch with Sabrina recently she may have mentioned to you that we would like to have a camp host up at the campground.  We would like to start our search with the local Backcountry Horsemen chapters, as we feel this would be a great pond to fish in for folks who are competent and trustworthy.  If we don’t find them within your chapters then we will expand our search to other chapters and a few other organizations, such as Facebook groups and maybe the Forest Service.

We have developed the attached flyer for our search.  Would you all be so kind as to send it out to your chapters?

Also, I want to be clear as to which chapter you’re each a part of, so can you reply and let me know, please?

If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact me via Email or my cell at 208-629-9270.

Thanks – Diane Carty  horsey4life@msn.com   

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SUMMER 2020
SPRING 2020
FALL  2019

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TRAIL DOCUMENT PACKAGE

PDF

Trails that BCHI Chapter Squaw Butte work on generally fall into Trail Class One, Two or Three! If a proper trail corridor is not maintained a trail class 3 can quickly turn into a class 2 or 1 or dissipate completely.
PDF – USFS Trail Classes
When working on a trail, it is not enough to just cut a path through the down trees, it is very important to cut back the brush and remove small trees that are in the trail corridor so that the trail bed is visible and safe to travel on.

Examples from the Kennally Creek Project

Working on T-099 Kennally Creek Trail which is a class 3 with sections of Class 2

David working on the Cougar Lake trail which is some class 2 but mostly class 1 and in many sections completely brushed over so the trail bed has vanished and could not be followed.


Tom Z and David working on the Needles Trail

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Flash had a small wound on his lower leg that had taken forever to heal. His vet recommended an antibiotic for a week, but the owner didn’t think the wound was healing fast enough. Her friend happened to have another antibiotic in her tack trunk. They added that one in too. 24 hours after starting the second antibiotic, Flash stopped eating, developed a fever, and then started pipe-stream diarrhea.
After 3 weeks in an equine hospital isolation barn and over $14,000.00 in vet bills, Flash was finally able to go home. He was crippled by laminitis, and he had lost one of his jugular veins. It would take him 3 months to return to being ridden again and he was never quite the same. Flash was one of the lucky ones. Most horses that develop severe antibiotic-induced colitis do not survive.  READ MORE

Don’t take antibiotic use in the horse lightly! As a responsible horse person:

• You should understand the potential benefits but also the limitations and dangers of systemic antibiotic use in horses.
• You should always use antibiotics under the direction of a licensed vet, experienced in equine medicine.
• You should recognize how fragile the equine intestinal microbiome is compared to that of other species. Know that disturbing it through the use of antibiotics can in rare cases mean the death of the horse.
• You should also understand and respect the danger of development of bacterial resistance to antibiotics.
• You should know the few antibiotics labeled for use in the horse, and that other use of antibiotics is extra-label. If there is an FDA-approved antibiotic for a given use, your vet should ideally select that over an extra-label antibiotic.
• You should have the skills to properly administer the medication. Here are a few skills that I list in Horse Side Vet

Guide, which you might need to be able to treat your horse with antibiotics:
Assessing treatment effectiveness: https://horsesidevetguide.com/drv/Skill/194/assess-effectiveness-of-treatment-objectively/

As the horse’s owner, you also have a vital role in providing feedback as to how a treatment is working. In this way, adjustments can be made in treatment plan.
How to give oral Medication:https://horsesidevetguide.com/drv/Skill/28/give-oral-medication/
Assess your horse’s general health:https://horsesidevetguide.com/drv/Skill/146/perform-whole-horse-exam-whe/

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Leave no trace camping puppet show for kids was created by volunteer Ethan and Ranger Katie in 2009 to communicate to children at lower grade levels. Alaska Park Service     Watch Video

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The highline  – Way back in 2009 I created a highline how to video. It’s been  pretty popular and I hope it’s been helpful. But that was over a decade ago and lots of things have changed in that time. Not only do I have less hair, and a rocking beard, I set up my highline differently now.

It’s time to refresh, revamp, and revise this piece. Please join me as we discover the joy of “A Better Way to Hold Your Horses”.

The highline. At its heart it’s just a stout rope stretched between two sturdy objects. But like many things that seem simple at first blush there’s a little more to it.

Done well a highline is a safe and effective tool to help keep our ponies out of trouble. Done poorly there’s few easier ways to heartbreak.

READ MORE    /     Buy a highline kit

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Located 30 miles north of Ola, Idaho off forest road 625, the west mountain North trail head provides access to two excellent trails.  TR-131 know both as the West Mountain trail and this end known as the Squaw Creek trail, follows Squaw creek up a canyon of big trees, water falls and rock formations.  This is a technical trail with a number of rocky sections so better left to experienced trail riders.  Poison Creek trail TR-134 is a ridge trail and while there are some steep sections it is not technical and has some amazing views.  The project that six members of the Squaw Butte Chapter was on the first few miles of TR-131, we knew it needed brushing and expected blow down, we found lots of both.

You know you are living in Idaho, when you have to pull over to allow a family and their friends to move stock down a country road.  As this was a day project for most of the group, we parked at the trail head which is up FR 625G and has parking for about 8 trailers with a little planning. Part of the area was wet as the forest service had fixed the water tire and it was overflowing. By ten we were on the trail with Rob towing an extra horse for the forest service guy who was a no-show. 

Tom and Rob handled the chain saws while the rest of the crew brushed. By 14:00 we were bushed and needed a break,. We stopped at a nice spot by the creek and had lunch, this became the turn-around point but we stopped a number of time on the way back to do more brushing. By 17:00 we were back at the trailers and loaded for the trip home.

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Watch Video

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At the request of the Sawtooth Ranger District, Kent May and Tom Winters, BCHI held a Sawyer Workshop for the Volunteer Trail Crew leaders of the Sawtooth Society with the goal of “B” level USFS chainsaw certification. Rob Adams and Charles Chick from the Squaw Butte Chapter of BCHI ran the workshop on July 14 & 15.

On Wednesday was the field day portion of the workshop. We started the day behind the ranger station in what they call the boneyard. This area had a lot of dead and down trees which Chick and Rob used as cutting problems for the three students Brad, Dalton and Kit. After a couple of hours we shifted the workshop to a local trail that had not been worked in a number of years and the wind gods had pushed down a lot of trees over the trail making it unusable!

As you can see from the following pictures the trail leaders got to work on some interesting cutting problem while working on their “B” level certification and we cleared over 1.5 miles of this trail!

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11. July 2020 · Comments Off on JEFF PADGETT – ST. MARY PEAK VOLUNTEER LOOKOUT HOST · Categories: Around The Campfire

I awoke thinking of death And being unable to go back to sleep Read of death in Leaves of Grass “Yourself! Yourself! Yourself, forever and ever!”

The darkness envelops It is fearful, yet common The comforting hearths of the ants of the Bitterroot Valley below me Yet on the other side, black I know what is there but I cannot see it
READ MORE

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10. July 2020 · Comments Off on PNF – Twenty Mile Lakes project · Categories: Public Lands, Work Parties and Projects

On Tuesday afternoon July 7th Tom Zahradnicek, Mike & Karen Heilman and Rob Adams meet at the 20 mile creek trail head on the east end of upper Payette lake north east of McCall. The purpose of this project was to work on clearing the down fall on the trail that climbs to five mountain lakes that branches off trail 085. We were joined by Adam Larson from the McCall ranger district. Also working the trail out of this trail head were members of the Montana Conservation Corps that were working on the lower trail for the next 14 days.

Due to covid-19 we planned to not do group food, but Tom had just come back from the coast with a cooler full of fresh dungeness crab which he generously shared with the group, this is ruffing it!

The plan was to meet Adam at the trail head at 08:00 Wednesday with the stock all saddled and packed and be on the trail by 08:30. We all know that this NEVER happens, but on this day it did! While Karen stayed with their dog the four of us headed up the trail. After scouting the lower trail, Mike turned back to get Karen to go on a ride and Tom, Adam and Rob continued to the cut-off for the lakes trail.

The minute we turned on that trail we encountered the first of over 50 downed trees that we removed during the 10 hours we were on the trail

We rode out dead tired but completed the project and had a great time doing it!

Details: Min Alt 5,731  Max Alt 7,716   Miles on the trail 12   Time on the trail 9:48

From: Blake, Jennifer B -FS <jennifer.b.blake@usda.gov>

Squaw Butte members
Thanks so much for the work you and your crew did on the Twenty Mile Trail on the McCall Ranger District. This is a beautiful and high use area and your work will enable hundreds of people to enjoy this area. We certainly could not keep up with all the work without your help.

Thanks, Jenni Blake

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07. July 2020 · Comments Off on Idaho Wildlife Federation – July News Update · Categories: Current Events

LINK TO NEWS

 

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01. July 2020 · Comments Off on Horse Wrecks 101 – 7 Tips for Dealing with a Bad Situation with a Horse · Categories: Education

June 30, 2020 by Allison Trimble
Horses have a way of reminding me how quickly things can go awry. Over the years, I’ve started running my mares in small herds with the breeding stallion. Everyone is happier and conception rates are better, but it does come with a few kicks and bites. I’m always more apprehensive turning out mares with foals at their side. I know the mares can stand their ground, but it’s easy for a baby to get caught in the crossfire.

This year, I turned out my first mare and foal with my younger stallion, Hawk. The mare is an experienced herd leader, and they spent all summer together last year. I expected some scuffles while she put him in his place, but as often happens with horses, it all went bad—quickly.

When they met for the first time, it happened to be in the only slick spot in a huge field. As she wheeled and turned to kick at him, she slipped, and landed upside down with two legs through a wire fence, and him looming over her. Not an ideal situation. If that had happened without me on watch, it would have ended very differently.

For the most part, accidents can be avoided. Other times, horses have a way of trying to die in the safety of a 12 x 12 stall. Safe intervention is key to both the horse and the human coming out of the wreck as unharmed as possible. Here are a few tips for dealing with a horse in a bad situation.

  1. Don’t rush.
    It’s hard to resist hurrying to help, but it’s always best to stay calm. Get to a safe distance quickly, but without adding additional panic to the event.

 

  1. Assess the problem.
    Objectively look at the predicament. What’s the easiest way to free the horse with the least damage to them and minimize your own risk? Most of the time we’re dealing with a horse tangled in wire, wrapped in a rope, or cast. Figure out what tools are available to help. As I hustled to the top of the field, I grabbed a branch from a downed tree on the way, to get the stud away from the downed mare, while protecting my distance.

 

  1. Wait until the horse stops struggling.
    There’s nothing to be gained by engaging too early. A horse in a fight response will struggle until he is free or determines he cannot get free. Countless times I have seen a person try and free a horse that is pulling back, only for the horse to lunge forward, knocking the person to the ground, or worse, into a trailer or wall.  Whatever is going to happen is going to happen. It’s best to not be in the mix when it does. Once the horse stops fighting, you can try to help. The mare quit struggling once the stallion was away, and she had tried a few times to right herself, unsuccessfully. I stayed at a safe distance until she quieted.

 

  1. Anticipate what the horse will do once freed.
    Expectations for what will happen next is important for staying safe. For example, cutting a lead rope will result in a loose horse. What are the surroundings? How will he be caught? This was a range mare who doesn’t tie and has never had her feet done. One year I had tried to tie this mare to be bred (after having been warned that she did not tie). She subsequently pulled back and ripped the entire top rail from the hitching post and ran off with the 10-foot rail trailing behind her. Fast forward to the present. If I tried to untangle her from the inside of the fence, she would roll into me, kicking me on the way. The only solution was to hurdle the fence and try and untangle from the offside.

 

  1. Execute the plan.
    Most horses, once they have quit fighting, will lie still while you help them. I slowly untangled her foot, and then gave her a start so she’d try and right herself again. She got up and took off to find her baby.

 

  1. Examine the horse and assess any injury.
    I was able to see that she didn’t have any cuts or abrasions while I was untangling her, and she took off sound, screaming her head off across the field. She had a couple scuffs from the stallion from before I got to her, but nothing that needed treating, and she got her pound of flesh from him by the next morning as he resumed his position below her in the herd.

 

  1. Learn.
    There’s often a lesson to be learned. Here I was reminded about a stretch of old perimeter fence that was there when I bought the property. If this same turn of events had happened anywhere else in the field, the hot wire would’ve given way. They would’ve been loose, but the majority of the wreck would have been avoided. Horses are incredibly adept at finding your weak spots, both practically and metaphorically. No time like the present to build some fence.
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30. June 2020 · Comments Off on Trail between Stanley and Redfish Lake is in the right place · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

In March 2019, I retired after a 30-year career as a backcountry recreation manager for the Sawtooth National Recreation Area. In that position, I helped design and lay out many trails including, as my last major trails project, the Galena Summer Trails Network at Galena Lodge.

Based on that experience, I can guarantee that no competent trails designer and few incompetent ones would even consider the trail location along State Highway 75 proposed by Mr. David Boren in the June 14 article in the Idaho Statesman.

In 2005, the Sawtooth National Recreation Area purchased a trail easement across private land now owned by Mr. Boren in the location determined to provide the best recreation opportunity, emphasizing the world-class views of the Sawtooths and ease of trail construction. The trail on the easement is vastly preferable for recreationists who can enjoy the views of the Sawtooths for the entire length of this section of the trail rather than just a short portion of the Boren proposal.

The recreation opportunity provided by the highway trail would not even resemble a desirable experience, and construction of a trail on the extremely steep loose slopes above the highway is impractical in the extreme. The problems with the highway trail, for both construction and experiential reasons are too numerous to mention in the space I have here, but I would eagerly walk both routes with anyone who would like to discuss them.

As to the easement trail’s effects on sandhill crane nesting, the bench is not nesting habitat. Sandhill cranes prefer to nest in riparian areas, not open sagebrush areas. And while elk do use the bench, they are active in the early morning and late evening when use of the trail would be minimal.

The idea that Mr. Boren is concerned about the view of the Sawtooths is a bit confusing, considering that he is building a monster house directly front and center of that view. The few people who get married at the Sawtooth Meditation Chapel and would see the trail, as pointed out by Mr. Boren, pales in comparison to the hundreds of thousands who will have their view marred by his mansion. And I will point out that the land in the foreground of the chapel slopes away from the building and recedes from view quite quickly. And if Mr. Boren does really care about the view, how hard did he try to convince his brother to not build his own mansion, again, front and center of the view of the Sawtooths?

Mr. Boren’s excitement for the view of the Sawtooths that he felt as a child is exactly why the Forest Service is building the trail on the easement, not along the highway. I believe in the power of landscape to inspire people. To spend time immersed in awe can be transformative. I experienced it and over the course of my career in the Sawtooths I had contact with many many others who did, as well. That opportunity for awe is ever-present on the easement trail and is woefully absent from the highway trail.

There is wealth in this landscape. Not wealth that can be measured in dollars and cents, but wealth that fills people’s souls and moves them to greater heights. Science increasingly documents this, and the easement trail provides it; the highway trail decidedly does not. The American people paid for the right to build this trail where it provides the most benefit. Let’s not allow the wealth of “a Boise tech company success story” to deny them that.

Ed Cannady retired last year after working for the U.S. Forest Service for 30 years, many of them as backcountry manager for the Sawtooth National Recreation Area.
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29. June 2020 · Comments Off on ITA- Executive Director Jeff Halligan announces his retirement · Categories: Around The Campfire

Job Posting
https://www.idahotrailsassociation.org/2020/06/ita-seeking-executive-director/

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29. June 2020 · Comments Off on Equine First Aid Kit · Categories: Education

VIEW THE LIST

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28. June 2020 · Comments Off on inReach Field Experience Webinar · Categories: Around The Campfire, Education

View On-line

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22. June 2020 · Comments Off on BCHI – Treasure Valley Chapter – National Trails Day Project · Categories: Around The Campfire

Treasure Valley has posted a great report on their delayed National Trails day project on their Facebook page. Check it out!

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21. June 2020 · Comments Off on Trail Project – Hitt Mountain – Payette National Forest · Categories: Public Lands, Work Parties and Projects

Nine members of Squaw Butte met at the Hitt Mountain Trail Head on Saturday morning June 20, 2020. This trail head is about 15 miles south west of Cambridge Idaho on the Idaho side of Hell’s Canyon. The purpose of this project was to do trail maintenance on a number of trails out of this trail head. Some of the members arrived on Friday and took a quick ride and discovered that the Morel’s were up and on this weekend after all the rain, big and plentiful.  So morel hunting became the focus if there were no down trees in the way
How to Safely Identify and Harvest Morels
How to Preserve Morel Mushrooms

The trails we worked are highlighted in yellow.  The total distance of this loop is 11.2 miles with a 4000 foot elevation change.  The highlights of this ride are the great views, wild flowers, stream crossings and the fire lookout!  We remove five trees during our ride and found more morel’s.

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21. June 2020 · Comments Off on Trail Project – Peace Creek – Boise National Forest · Categories: Work Parties and Projects

On Thursday, June 18, 2020 Phil Ryan and Rob Adams performed trail maintenance on 5.5 miles of the Peace Creek Trail north of Garden Valley. We remove some brush and five downed trees. This was the first ride in the mountains for Phil’s new horse.

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21. June 2020 · Comments Off on P&R Idaho Non-motorized Trail Stickers Available · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

EPSON MFP image

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19. June 2020 · Comments Off on Garmin Sale on Select inReach Devices · Categories: Around The Campfire

Link to Website

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16. June 2020 · Comments Off on BCHI – New Website On-Line · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

https://bchi.org/

 

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12. June 2020 · Comments Off on National Fuel Geyser Awareness · Categories: Around The Campfire

 

 

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11. June 2020 · Comments Off on SBFC – A summer in the Church · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

WATCH VIDEO

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04. June 2020 · Comments Off on BCHI – USFS Designated Volunteer Firearm Users for Stock Euthanasia · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

TO: Rod Parks
Just so folks aren’t overwhelmed with all the documents I sent you, the Regional Forester letter and 7 attachments are meant as a “packet” for the local Forest Service unit to be able to implement this framework (such as the template letter and template wording that local Forest Service staff will add to a volunteer agreement so a volunteer who is a designated firearm user for stock euthanasia is covered for workers’ compensation).

The three documents that will be relevant for BCH members will be the Qualification Inquiry, the list requesting folks who would like to be considered for designation, and the Job Hazard Analysis (specific to firearm use). The other documents in the packet are to help the local FS unit understand the framework and pull all the other pieces of this together, to help make it go as smooth as possible.

Also, as clarification, the Forest Service policy re: volunteers and firearms isn’t new — it’s been in place for many years (I’ve shared it below). What is being “piloted” in R1 is a framework to help make the policy more workable for volunteers who would need firearms for stock euthanasia.

Here’s the current policy:
Forest Service Manual (FSM) 1833.12 – Volunteers Using Firearms
Volunteers may carry firearms in situations where field-going employees (except law enforcement employees) would carry them. Such volunteers must receive appropriate training and certification for firearm use and meet any other requirements for firearms handling.

I hope that helps!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FROM: Rod Parks

Below is the official version of the Volunteer Firearm Users Policies & Forms. Only three attachments are pertinent to BCHI members.

Also Attached is a letter from Joni Packard that has the policy explained in a simple version.

BCHI members need reminded that this policy currently is a pilot program in Region 1 only and does not apply if any chapters are using a Challenge Cost Share Agreement to perform volunteer projects.

It is only offered if your chapter is volunteering on a signed Volunteer Agreement.

Another note, Joni Packard has retired so any questions should be emailed to David Sabo

Email: Dave Sabo <david.sabo@usda.gov>

Thanks, Rod Parks BCHI Chairman

R1 JHA Volunteer_firearm_animal_disposal -signed

5300_FY20AgencyDesignatedVolFirearmStockEuthanasia

Zipped file of USFS Documents

Euthanize a Horse in an Emergency with Gun

 

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02. June 2020 · Comments Off on SBFC – Moose Creek Volunteers · Categories: Around The Campfire

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28. May 2020 · Comments Off on SBFC – The Wildest Place – Spring 2020 · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

Click on Picture or HERE to read

Hello Wilderness advocates!
I hope this note finds you and your loved ones healthy and enjoying the outdoors.

Once again, we are adapting to our circumstances.  The printer we normally use to print/mail the newsletter remains closed.

We are delivering the Spring 2020 edition of the newsletter to your inbox rather than your mailbox.  We’ve put the newsletter in a format that we hope you enjoy.  You can electronically turn the pages as you would our printed newsletter. Just click on the side arrows to turn the pages!  You can access the newsletter by clicking on the button below!  I hope you enjoy reading it as much as we enjoyed putting it together.

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25. May 2020 · Comments Off on BCHI – Public Events Liability Insurance Coordinator Needed · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

BCHI Members:

Bill Conger has done a fantastic job as Insurance Coordinator for many years, but he advised me that he is ready to pass this position on to a new member with BCHI.

Please consider volunteering to take over this position as a state director. If you are not interested, please pass this email on to all your chapter members, as a person does not have to be a director to hold the position, just a member of any chapter. An insurance background may be beneficial, but not required.

The Liability Insurance Policy only covers participants from the public that attend events and activities sponsored by BCHI Chapters. It does not cover any BCHI members.

Below is a job description for you to review. Also there is information and forms on the BCHI Website at https://www.bchi.org/documents.htm under “Public Events Liability Insurance”.

Please contact me by phone or email me with any questions and if you are willing to volunteer for this position.

Thanks,

Rod Parks

BCHI Chairman, 208-791-3246,  rod.d.parks@gmail.com

June 15, 2020 Update

Welcome our new BCHI Insurance Coordinator,

Corey L Dwinell
841 N Boulder Ct #A
Post Falls ID 83854
208-661-4265
email: Corey L Dwinell <coreysfarmers@gmail.com>

 

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23. May 2020 · Comments Off on FUD – One of these might be a good thing to have in your saddle bags. · Categories: Around The Campfire

Female Urinary Devices, also known as FUDs, or pee funnels, can really save the day. These items are a well-kept secret of female campers because they let you go #1 without having to drop your pants completely. Without these devices that let you pee standing up, women have to wander very far away from camp to get the privacy they need. With an FUD., since you can actually “go” while standing up, you experience the same “go anywhere” convenience that men enjoy.
TB Video        Review of 10 FUD products

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22. May 2020 · Comments Off on Squaw Butte Trail Ratings · Categories: Fun Rides, Work Parties and Projects

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22. May 2020 · Comments Off on SBFC – Taking a Walk · Categories: Around The Campfire

READ MORE

 

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21. May 2020 · Comments Off on Mountain Manners – A guide to stock use in the back country · Categories: Education, Horse Camping, Public Lands


Mountain Manner Handbook
Stock-Use-JHA

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20. May 2020 · Comments Off on Succor Creek Recreation Area – Power Line Loop · Categories: Fun Rides

On May 17, 2020 a gray and rainy morning didn’t discourage eleven members of the Squaw Butte Chapter to meet in the Succor Creek recreation area at 10:00. Little pools of blue sky could be seen off to the west, but the weather was coming from the south west and that was gray. It didn’t matter, the group formed two teams, one would ride the complete loop in a clock-wise direction the other team of five including Linda Hughes were opting for a shorter ride and would ride the loop counter-clock-wise starting at the canyon end. We met up in the middle of the canyon in which Succor creek flows. During the whole ride the we only got wet from the water the horses kicked up at the seven creek crossing. Some crossing were boot deep and great practice for the horses before we start riding in the mountains in June/July. The picture below were taken by Rob Adams team, Linda Hughes team also took pictures which are available on the chapter website picture page. The complete loop according to my GPS tracker info was 7.9 miles.

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19. May 2020 · Comments Off on BCHI Foundation May Post · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

 

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19. May 2020 · Comments Off on How to Tie the Highwayman’s Hitch · Categories: Around The Campfire, Education

How to Tie the Highwayman’s Hitch

How to tie the HIGHWAYMAN’S HITCH  – Knot Tying Instructions

The Highwayman’s hitch is a quick-release hitch used for temporarily securing a load that will need to be released easily and cleanly, such as your horse! The hitch can be untied with a tug of the working end. The highwayman’s hitch can be tied in the middle of a rope, and so the working end does not need to be passed around the anchor, or rail, when tying or releasing.

Steps to Highwayman’s Hitch

1 – Double your rope to make the first bight in the rope and place the bight behind your rail.

2 – Make a second bight in the standing line and pass that bight through the first bight

3 – Take the working end and make a third bight.

4 – Pass the third bight through second and pull on the standing line to snug the knot.

The knot holds with tension on the standing part and can be released with a tug on the working end.

And here’s the video on How to Tie the Highwayman’s Hitch

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17. May 2020 · Comments Off on Outdoor Idaho – Trailblazers · Categories: Around The Campfire, Education, Public Lands

https://www.idahoptv.org/shows/outdooridaho/

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16. May 2020 · Comments Off on Public Lands – Boundary Water Wilderness · Categories: Public Lands

Read Story

 

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16. May 2020 · Comments Off on NWSA – Special Report “Going Outdoors or Staying Inside” · Categories: Around The Campfire

Special Report
Going Outdoors or Staying Inside
May 2020

Many people are turning to the outdoors to cope with the stress and concerns of the Corona Virus Pandemic. Volunteer groups may also be considering offering outdoor activities to the public to address this public use. But is this a good idea? Not really. Here is the rationale for why we need to encourage everyone to stay home and stay local.

Short Term Issues
The immediate effort nationwide is to prevent the spread of the Corona virus. This is being accomplished by requesting, and in some states demanding, that people self-quarantine, maintain social distancing, and practice good hygiene practices. Non-essential businesses where large number of people congregate like restaurants, theaters, bars, and gyms have been closed. Sporting events of all types have been cancelled and venues closed. State and local parks, some National Forest recreation sites, and National Parks are being closed as well. These closures initially were intended to last 2-3 weeks but may extend for 4-6 weeks or longer depending on local infection rates.

For stewardship organizations this strategy has meant cancelling meetings, trainings, and outdoor events for the near term. Volunteer activities can be expected to be curtailed for several months. While generally access to dispersed areas like wilderness is open, some popular trailheads may be closed to prevent people from congregating.

There has also been mixed messaging about going to the outdoors to escape the virus and other people. While we extoll the virtues of getting outdoors, what has happened instead is even more people seeking out these opportunities creating large crowds in popular areas. It is important that people stay close to home, and enjoy nature in their backyards, their neighborhoods, or at least for the time being, virtually. Protecting the health of our communities and avoiding strains on the medical infrastructure, especially in our vunerable rural areas, are critical right now.

This article says it all:  High Country News:  https://www.hcn.org/articles/covid19-as-covid19-spreads-how-do-you-ethically-get-outdoors/

Here are Leave No Trace suggestions for getting outdoors:  https://lnt.org/the-leave-no-trace-recommendations-for-getting-outside-amidst-covid-19/

Here are suggestions from the Outdoor Alliance on getting outside during this crisis.

Stewardship Group Coping Strategies

Groups around the country are adapting to the crisis situation.  Here are some ideas for your organization.

  • Review your plans for the year and postpone or reschedule events to June or later.
  • Consider doing training online or with video conferencing software like Zoom of GoToMeeting.
  • Consider adapting your recruiting from a national to a local area model. Impacts to travel and concerns over the spread of the virus will continue for months impacting broad recruitment area strategies.  Local recruitment may offer new opportunities for relationship building and capacity growth while providing needed employment stimulus locally.
  • Check in with your agency partners to see what current policies are and what resources they might have available. The Park Service has created a webpage for Partners during this crisis at:  https://www.nps.gov/subjects/partnerships/publichealthforpartners.htm
  • If you have existing agreements with agency partners, start discussing now how closures will affect recruiting and summer programs. Adjust your agreements as necessary.
  • The current stand down may result in additional year end fund availability. Never too early to start discussing future projects and potential agreements with agency partners to put these funds to good use.

DOWNLOAD PAPER

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07. May 2020 · Comments Off on Dennis R. Dailey of Pinedale, Wyoming | 1943 – 2020 | Obituary · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

“If my world should end today I will have led a good life. My bucket list is not overflowing with unfulfilled dreams. Oh, there are a lot of things that I’d still like to do, but most of them I’ve done already and simply want to do again or do in new places. My regrets do not involve unfulfilled dreams, they involve leaving the people behind that are most dear to me and have comprised the fabric and color of my life.

As a boy growing up in South Dakota, I was inspired by the movie cowboys – Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, Randolph Scott, and others – of heroes on horses or sitting at a campfire singing and playing a guitar while the sun set in the west, and then, of course, riding off into the sunset with a beautiful girl at my side. I was never a cowboy, but I’ve ridden many miles of high country trail, smelled horse sweat and listened to the creak of a saddle, and I’ve been blessed with the love of a good woman, my wife, life partner, and best friend, and the company of a number of good horses and dogs. Money cannot buy the experiences I’ve enjoyed. I did it all.

I have lived my dreams. While many people hope they are able to take a vacation once a year, my life has been a vacation. My work has involved two very important elements of my dreams: working with horses and working in the wilderness. I never had a job in the Forest Service that didn’t involve wilderness, including some very spectacular wildernesses – the Bob Marshall, the Bridger, and the Selway-Bitterroot, and I was able to enjoy them from horseback. After the Forest Service, I worked with the Back Country Horsemen of America for 16 years working to preserve the opportunity for equestrians to enjoy horses and mules in wilderness and backcountry. For me, work and recreation seemed to merge into one.

I have spent most of my adult life preserving and protecting god’s resources. Unless we can feel the beauty of our wildlands down deep in our souls and understand that they are a gift from God, we can foolishly believe that God created the earth and its resources for the sole purpose of our exploitation. The Bible tells us to “Follow the desires of your heart and your eyes, but know that God will bring you to judgement for all these things.” Ecclesiastes 11:9. Geoghegan and Homan interpret this passage to mean: “The chief aim of life – given the inevitability of death – is to enjoy life before we grow old,…but live life to the fullest while still living right.” (The Bible for Dummies) I pray that by following my passion that I have recognized and used the tools and abilities that God gave me to accomplish the purpose that he had in mind when he created me.”

Dennis leaves behind his wife Liz, children Lesley (Chuck) Wenz, David Dailey, and Michael Dailey (Stacey) and Michael’s children Rylee and Sam. Dennis served 8 years in the Air Force.

In lieu of formal services, Dennis and his family encourage you to stroll the trails at the CCC Ponds outside of Pinedale, Wyoming, and allow God’s gifts of nature to feed your soul in any way you choose.

 

This is what Steve Didier sent out about Dennis:

Dennis Dailey was an icon who had a profound affect on BCH, locally and at the National level. He was instrumental in the formation of the North Central Idaho BCH chapter when he was District Ranger of the only all wilderness District in the Region. And he quickly became my mentor in the depths of wilderness law and management. Subsequently he guided me and BCHA in public lands advocacy and management. We spent countless hours together in public lands meetings and travel, all the while he was guiding state organizations like California BCH in their legal struggles on overreaches in Forest Service Region 6.

Sadly we grew apart when he and his wife Liz moved back to Wyoming, none the less, his passing is deeply felt by me and all who knew him.

Happy celestial trails Dennis, till we meet again.

from Rod Parks

Dennis was a long time member of BCH of North Central Idaho and a state director for many years. He and his wife Liz moved to Wyoming when he retired. He was never a National Director of BCHA that I can remember, but for many years he was the Wilderness Advisor to BCHA. I called Dennis many times when I was a BCHI National Direcctor for guidance when we were going through the Trail Classification Task with BCH and the forest service. He was a wealth of information and always willing to help and advise.

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06. May 2020 · Comments Off on Trail Master Series Webinar: Backcountry Cooking with Carrie · Categories: Education

Tired of eating pre-package backpacking meals? Guest speaker Carrie Holmes, a certified health coach, wants to help YOU spice up your backpacking meals. She will cover general hiking and backpacking nutrition, incorporating plant-based options into your menu, and how to bring a cultural flair to your recipes. Carrie has done extensive research into foods and spices from other cultures and wants to help you create delectable meals that will make your hiking partners jealous.

Link to Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TCOXG11Xcoc&feature=youtu.be

Link to PDF: ITA_Backpacking_Recipes

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05. May 2020 · Comments Off on Trail Meister – At Home Clinic Video’s · Categories: Education

LINK: https://www.trailmeister.com/at-home-clinics/

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05. May 2020 · Comments Off on Recreating Responsibly during Covid-19 · Categories: Around The Campfire

READ MORE: Recreating Responsibly COVID-19

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03. May 2020 · Comments Off on Interactive BNF Closures Map · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

For the latest Boise National Forest updates visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/boise/home

For all Boise NF closure information visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

Boise National Forest interactive closure story map: https://usfs.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=1b9f2d8115374ad3a943d95decd3835d

National Forests in Idaho closure story map: https://usfs.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=d0588d7e48ee430da80c5ad88c48b43d

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03. May 2020 · Comments Off on USDA Forest Service Intermountain Region welcomes acting regional forester · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

Intermountain Region Acting Regional Forester news release 4.20.2020

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30. April 2020 · Comments Off on Idaho forests extend campground and hot springs closures, cancel rafting reservations · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

April 29. 2020

As Idaho prepares to reopen some businesses and lift its coronavirus-related stay-home order, some federal agencies are tightening or extending restrictions related to the pandemic.

In a news release on Tuesday, the U.S. Forest Service announced it would extend some closures in the Salmon-Challis National Forest and cancel permits to float the Salmon River and Middle Fork of the Salmon through mid-May. Any “developed recreation sites” including campsites and day-use sites are closed through May 15, while “Forest Trail #6232, the Warm Springs Trail and the area within 250 yards from the center of Gold Bug Hot Springs” will be closed through the end of May.

Officials said anyone with a float permit will receive an email notification that their permit has been canceled, as well as a refund of any fees. Permits are required year-round to float the Salmon River and Middle Fork of the Salmon, though the primary float season is from June to September.

Forest Service officials said the continued closures are meant to prevent the spread of coronavirus and the disease it causes, COVID-19.

“We have visitors that want to enjoy the forest but many areas are drawing more people than social distancing guidelines recommend,” said Chuck Mark, Salmon-Challis National Forest supervisor, in the news release. “As spring progresses, many of these recreation sites are beginning to become accessible. We will continue to monitor the situation closely. The forest is developing a plan to phase reopening some sites when conditions allow.”

Similarly, the Boise National Forest announced on Friday that it would extend closures at campgrounds, hot springs and trailheads through June 30 due to the pandemic. The agency had previously announced that many popular campgrounds near Boise, including Cottonwood, Sage Hen and Peace Valley, would be closed through the end of June; however, its early April closure of hot springs had no initial expiration date.

A list of all affected Boise National Forest sites can be found online at fs.usda.gov.

Also on Tuesday, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced restrictions at Lucky Peak Dam. The Corps said, until further notice, fires and camping are prohibited and boats are required to be docked at a marina or out of the water between sunset and sunrise. According to the Corps’ news release, the restrictions were “made in response to public safety and resource protection concerns,” though it’s not clear if they are related to coronavirus. The Statesman has reached out to the Corps for more information.

BNF-Closed PDF              04-03-2020 Idaho COVID Group Limits of 10 order SIGNED

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27. April 2020 · Comments Off on BCHA – April Update · Categories: BCHI /BCHA


Executive Committee Minutes 04/14/2020

BCHA Public Lands Call April 13, 2020

PROCESS FOR RESOLVING PUBLIC LANDS ISSUES WITH US FOREST SERVICE

Public Lands Workshop #1

Public Lands Workshop #2

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27. April 2020 · Comments Off on Social Distancing – Friend of the Bridger-Teton · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

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