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THE COALITION FOR PUBLIC LAND
Keep It Public is a 501c3 non-profit organization run exclusively by volunteers. When you give to KIP, you help:

1. Build educational content about the American public land system
2. Direct hands-on conservation to assist our land management agencies
3. Provide a voice for sensible policy via direct advocacy

Whether it’s from a historical, constitutional, or economic vantage point, public lands are a national treasure. Given the amount of discord present in our society, we feel an obligation to demonstrate that individuals from a variety of backgrounds – be they recreational, industrial, or political – can come together over the unique and wonderful lands that belong to us all.

Join us in a united stance on behalf of federal public lands. #keepitpublic             https://keepitpublic.org/

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https://www.bcha.org/

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CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION

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ABOUT WESTERN TRAIL RIDER
February 2016:

During the summer of 2012, I got together with an old friend I hadn’t seen in a while. As we sat and talked, he mentioned that one day he’d like to ride from Mexico to Canada on the Great Western Trail (GWT). That conversation planted a seed in the back of my mind (very fertile ground, due to a lot of dead and composted ideas back there), which took root and started to grow. I spoke with him several weeks later and together we decided we would give it a shot. As I started looking for information on the GWT, I was surprised at how little there really was. Apparently nobody had made the full trip in one shot before, at least not that I found documented. There were only wildly divergent estimates on the mileage, ranging from 3,000 to 4,500 miles, despite the fact that it’s only about 1,500 miles by roads (Google Maps), so estimating travel time is pretty much a wild guess. In fact, on the GWT website, I was the only registrant on the equine forum, so they made me an administrator. Read More

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More Pictures           Lou Ann’s Directions
June 2, 2018 was National Trails Day and Squaw Butte likes to make this project weekend fun for it’s members and to put our organization in front of the public. The Peace Creek trail head fits both of those requirements.  Working with Charlie Jarvis, the Boise National Forest trails supervisor, we got the camping site reserved for our team and planned a full day of trail clearing and sawyer education.

Thirteen members and seventeen stock meet at the trail head camp, most arriving on Friday night. Camp was set up and stock feed and then an ad-hock dinner was prepared and shared. Even with a nice camp fire, when the sun went down around 21:30 the air turned cold and all wandered off to their warm sleeping bags.  Morning came about 06:30 when the first of us got up and the stock noticed.  Soon they were all asking to be feed and by 07:00 coffee was being sipped around the fire.  Lisa had pre-made breakfast sandwiches which Bill warmed in the oven of his camper.  By 08:30 we were saddling up and when Charlie Jarvis arrived ready for our project safety meeting.


With 13 members plus Charlie and multiple packing stock, we broke up into two teams, one would work the main Peace Creek trail with Charlie and a second would work the lower valley trail that connected to the Devil’s slide trail.

Peace creek trail (blue) Devil’s Slide Trail (red)

Rob, Shelly, Lou Ann, Nancy and Shannon worked the lower trail, while Chick & Lorraine, David, Lisa, Phil, Charlie, Fanny and Jon worked the main trail.  Bill stayed in camp, fished and got some fire wood for our evening fire.

On Rob’s crew, Shelly did all the work while Rob took the role of limb swapper and sounding board as Shelly worked out her plan to tackle each down tree we encountered. Lou Ann helped with limbs and took all the pictures.  Nancy and Shannon arrived late and had a nice ride on the trail we had just cleared.

This tree had a complex bind and was stressed like a big spring, Shelly had to determine how to safely release the tension and then she could cut it up and remove it from the trail.
After 20 trees were removed and six miles of trail cleared, it was time to head back to the trailer for happy hour and munchies. The other team had arrived back just before us. They cleared a bit over 5.5 miles of trail, but didn’t clear as many trees, as a motorcyclist had started working the trail the weekend before. Charlie had wanted to survey general trail conditions and look at a rock slide that will need major work. After a great dinner that included pork tenderloin and moose, beers were drunk and stories swapped. If you didn’t cook, you helped with the dishes.

By 21:30 most of us had wandered off to our sleeping bags for a great nights sleep. Sunday dawned clear and not as cold, a great breakfast of onions, moose, eggs and potatoes, with home-made bread and hot coffee. Some headed for home and some of us took a fun ride before heading for our respective barns. This was a very successful project weekend and all who attended had a great time.

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23. May 2018 · Comments Off on Public Outreach – 2018 Spring Yard Sale · Categories: Around The Campfire, Fun Days

Each spring, Squaw Butte holds a public outreach yard sale at the Key Bank parking lot in Emmett, ID.  This sale is a way to fund many of the chapters purchased and training opportunities.  It is also very popular with the public, many who stop by each year to look for treasures and sometimes to bring items to donate.  Nothing has a price tag and all moneys are treated as donations that go into the chapters bank account.  Our Yard sale was held on May 19, 2018 which was a clear cool day wedged between days that had afternoon thunder storms.


During our leadership meeting in January we set budgets and estimate incoming money’s that will be available. This years sale was very successful and we expect our budget will stay in the black. Thank you to all the members who worked and to members and the general public for supporting this fund raising event.
The pictures were mostly taken while we were setting up and before the bus loads of shoppers arrived. Link to Video

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13. May 2018 · Comments Off on USFS Intermountain Region (4) Contacts · Categories: Public Lands

Intermountain Regional Office

Nora Rasure – Regional Forester
Dave Rosenkrance – Deputy Regional Forester
Mary Farnsworth – Deputy Regional Forester
324 25th Street
Ogden, UT 84401
801-625-5605

Region 4 Communication Contacts

Tammy Wentland
Director (Acting)
324 25th St
Ogden, UT 84401
801-625-5347

Andy Brunelle
Idaho State Liaison
350 N. 9th St., Suite 102
Boise, ID 83702
(208) 334-1770

Boise National Forest

Venetia Gempler
Acting Public Affairs Officer
1249 South Vinnell Way, Suite 200
Boise, ID 83709
(208) 373-4105

Linda Steinhaus
Public Affairs Specialist web
(208) 373-4106

Payette National Forest

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
800 West Lakeside Avenue
McCall, ID 83638
(208) 634-0784


Salmon-Challis National Forest

Amy Baumer
Public Affairs Officer
50 Highway 93 South
Salmon, ID 83467
(208) 756-5145


Sawtooth National Forest

Julie Thomas
Public Affairs Officer
2647 Kimberly Road East
Twin Falls, ID 83301-7976
(208) 737-3262

Boise National Forest
Tawnya Brummett – Acting Forest Supervisor
Kim Pierson
 – Deputy Forest Supervisor 
1249 South Vinnell Way, Suite 200
Boise, ID 83709
208-373-4100

Forests in Idaho (Contacts)

Boise | Caribou-Targhee | Payette | Salmon-Challis | Sawtooth

 

 

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13. May 2018 · Comments Off on Cecil D. Andrus-White Clouds and Hemingway-Boulders Wilderness Management Plan and EA · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Release Date: May 8, 2018

Sawtooth National Forest,  370 American Ave, Jerome, ID 83338

Media Contact 208‐423-7559/731-8604

Julie Thomas   May 8, 2018

OPPORTUNITY TO OBJECT, Cecil D. Andrus-White Clouds and Hemingway-Boulders Wilderness Management Plan and EA

Boulder-White Clouds – Order #0414-04-034

Sawtooth Wilderness – Order #0414-04-102

STANLEY, Idaho – The Sawtooth National Forest recently completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Cecil D. Andrus-White Clouds and Hemingway-Boulders Wilderness Management Plan. The Cecil D. Andrus-White Clouds Wilderness and Hemingway-Boulders Wilderness were designated through the passage of the Sawtooth National Recreation Area and Jerry Peak Wilderness Additions Act (P.L. 114-46) in August 2015. The project will establish, update, and provide consistent management direction for the Cecil D. Andrus-White Clouds and Hemingway-Boulders Wilderness, situated on federal public land managed by the Forest Service.

For the Cecil D. Andrus-White Clouds and Hemingway-Boulders Wilderness Management Plan, a scoping period took place where the agencies identified important issues and incorporated feedback into a draft EA. Interested parties were given the opportunity to submit written comments, which were reviewed, and now a final EA is available.

During the objection period, which is specific to Forest Service regulations, parties who have previously submitted specific written comments regarding the proposed project either during scoping or other designated opportunity for public comment in accordance with 36 CFR 218.5(a) and 219.16 have standing to object. Issues raised in objections must be based on previously submitted, timely, and specific written comments regarding the proposed project unless based on new information arising after designated opportunities. The objection period for the Cecil D. Andrus-White Clouds and Hemingway-Boulders Wilderness will begin May 9, 2018.

The wilderness plan, EA, draft Decision Notice and Finding of No Significant Impact (DN/FONSI), legal notice of opportunity to object, and other information are available for review at the Sawtooth National Forest Supervisor’s Office and at the Forest’s web site at https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49647 .

A hard copy of the wilderness plan, EA, and the draft DN/FONSI, can be obtained from: Sawtooth National Forest Supervisor’s Office, 370 American Avenue, Jerome, ID 83338, or comments-intermtn-sawtooth-nra-@fs.fed.us.

For further information contact Emily Simpson, (208) 630-3507 or emilysimpson@fs.fed.us.

For additional information about the Sawtooth National Forest call 208-737-3200 or visit the Sawtooth National Forest website at www.fs.usda.gov/sawtooth and like us on Facebook at. https://www.facebook.com/pages/US-Forest-Service-Sawtooth-National-Forest/986556001373037

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13. May 2018 · Comments Off on Sawyer Safety Workshop – 2018 · Categories: Education


On Saturday, May 12, 2018 Squaw Butte members Rob Adams, David Benson, Bill Conger, Janine Townsend, Lisa Griffith, Lynn Garner, Shelly Duff, Charles Chick, Chris & Bill Holt, Nancy Smith, Shannon Schantz, Luigina Klein and Phil Ryan participated in a Sawyer Safety Workshop. Charlie Jarvis, Supervisor of the Boise Nation Forest Northern Trail Crew, and Jascha Zeitlin, recreation manager for the western Payette National Forest attended, providing insight and great information in addition to the material covered from the Back Country Horseman of Oregon Sawyer Certification program.  Rob Adams & Charles Chick acted as workshop facilitators and all who attended felt the day was very worthwhile.  Video’s and materials used in this workshop are available on the chapter training page of the website.

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11. May 2018 · Comments Off on Selway Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation – Spring 2018 · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands


Find out what we’ve been up to lately!
Attached is your Spring 2018 E-Newsletter from Selway-Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation. Our season will be starting soon, you can follow our activities via our blog at http://www.selwaybitterroot.org

2018 Spring News SBFC

Sue Webster
Selway Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation
Communication & Membership Coordinator
RMRS – 322 E. Front St. Ste. 401
Boise, ID 83702
208-861-2010
swebster@selwaybitterroot.org

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10. May 2018 · Comments Off on BCHI Annual Report 2017 Projects · Categories: Around The Campfire, BCHI /BCHA

vol-hrs-rpt-2017
annual-report-2017

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10. May 2018 · Comments Off on Save the Spot · Categories: Current Events

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08. May 2018 · Comments Off on BCHA/BCHI National Director Report, from Marybeth Conger · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

Marybeth and Cherokee Lighter

BCHA/BCHI National Director Report, from Marybeth Conger

Thank you for giving me the opportunity to represent BCHI at the BCHA annual board meeting. Next year the meeting will be in North Carolina.

The annual BCHA board meeting was April 23-25 in Spokane, Washington which is where Bill and I came from. Meeting highlights include a memorial for lost members, acceptance of all agendas, letters, and minutes, Wisconsin was voted as our newest state, there were 11 committee reports, and a budget was approved. I was very impressed to hear that BCHA combined volunteer hours were very close to 13 million and the budget included funds for education.

Erica Fern is a full time employee who handles administration to include data. She presented a brochure and a traveling booth for use at public out reach. Also heard about Your Membership (YM) and how BCHW piloted to have this computer platform handle their membership data. There is some cost if a state chooses to do that.

Ken Carmichael, BCHW then presented a membership expansion program that was impressive. States then divided into 4 regions to discuss issues that were then presented to the committees. Bottom line, feedback was given on how the committees can help us and what the priority of their actions should be. The committees then meet and decided action plans and next steps. It was Interesting to see that all board members are on at least one committee. After all, we need to be part of the solution, right?

There was a guest speaker from Trail master; a Retired Forest Service employee shared his knowledge, and lastly a presentation on the most effective way to contact politicians.

We then passed several governing policy changes, which was informative. Then there were nominations and BCHA leadership is as follows: Freddy Dunn, Chairman, Darrell Wallace, Vice Chair, Sherry Copeland, Treasurer, Non director Executive Committee (EC) member, Mike McGlenn, and two Board members to the EC, Mark Himmell and Ginny Grulke. There was some wording issue in the governing policy that said the past chair would be on the EC for one year. The board voted to have the past chair on the EC for 2018 and that a committee reviews this wording for presentation at the next annual meeting.

Bill even agreed to be the auctioneer at the live auction. He did a great job getting people to spend more than they planned, just ask Mike McGlenn next time you see him.

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04. May 2018 · Comments Off on Idaho State Brand Inspector – 2018 · Categories: Education

Link to Idaho State Brand Inspector      // Idaho Brand Request Form:    AppforRecordingBrand

Cody.Burlile@isp.idaho.gov     To Schedule a Brand Inspection Call: 208 459-4231 (Caldwell Office)

L&H Branding Irons

Texas Freeze Brands

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04. May 2018 · Comments Off on Southwest Idaho Resource Advisory Committee – May 2018 · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

May 2, 2018

Thanks for the opportunity to share our latest proposed veg management project on the Emmett RD of the Boise NF.

As mentioned in our presentation – I am looking for candidates who are interested in becoming a member of the SW ID RAC. This is the group that makes recommendations on how Title II Secure Rural School monies are distributed.

If interested, please complete the attached form and either email it back to me or send it to me at: Richard Newton, 1805 Highway 16, Emmett, ID 83617.

Please call if you have any questions.

Thanks again.

RN.

Richard E. Newton
District Ranger

P: 208-365-7001
C: 208-994-1268
renewton@fs.fed.us

USDA Forest Service
Emmett Ranger District
1805 Highway 16, Room 5
Emmett, ID 83617

Form to Fill Out: AD-755_FORM_southwest_idaho_rac

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29. April 2018 · Comments Off on Squaw Butte’s Woman Packing Clinic · Categories: Current Events, Education

On April 28, 2018 the “Git R Done” team of Janine Townsend, Janelle Weeks, Shelly Duff and Kelly Ragland, lead by Lisa Griffith planned and executed one of the best clinics that Squaw Butte has ever hosted. They arranged for guest Speakers farrier Joe Prince and Vet Daniel Dombroski to do presentation.  They arranged for a Hot Dog truck to be on site for Lunch and they spent hours working on presentations for a woman centrist packing clinic.  They divided the clinic up into four segments.  
 The first was Joe Prince’s presentation on what to do if you loose a shoe in the back country.  Participants asked lots of good questions and Lisa horse did a great job modeling her hoofs.The second segments was lead by Janine Townsend and was a quick but fact filled discussion of packing and tips and techniques. During Janine’s talk the rest of the team demonstrated items she was covering.

After their presentation, a lunch break allow participants to digest what they had learned and some of the best hot dogs I have had out side of a ball park.  After lunch three demonstration stations were set up and Marybeth Conger and Rob Adams assisted the rest of the team doing hands on demonstrations and answering lots of great questions.

Marybeth demonstrates how to manty up a body, a skill luckily,  I have never had to practice. Her presentation had every one at her station in stitches.

The final segment of the day was an “On the Trail” question and answer session with Dr. Dan and equine radiologist Dana Neelis.  The Vets covered what they think should be in our saddle bags to do on the trail first aid for our stock, what to look for and how to start treatment before we can get them to a vet.

If you attended this clinic you spend a fun and information packed day and left a bit over whelmed but raring to go try some of the things you saw demonstrated or got a chance to try yourself. If you missed this one, hopefully this team of woman will hold another one in the future!  More Pictures

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22. April 2018 · Comments Off on Wilderness First Aid & CPR Course 2018 · Categories: Education

On Saturday April 21, 2018 members of Squaw Butte spent a full day with members of the Bogus Basin Ski Patrol lead by chief instructor Karen Alfonso-King in a full day of Wilderness first aid and CPR.  While these pictures show us sitting down a watching, most of the day was spend laughing and doing.  It is just hard to be applying a splint or doing an assessment at the same time. All who attended the class left with their first aid knowledge expanded and refreshed and more confidence that should the need arise that they would be able to use their first aid skills to render assistance in the back country or in their back yard.


SAM Splints are one of the simplest and most versatile pieces of first aid equipment available so at least one should be in every outdoor First Aid kit.  A soft, malleable aluminium strip sandwiched in foam, the splints become fairly rigid once formed into a 3D shape, the more complex the shape, the more rigid they become.
Using SAM Splits     SAM Split Video #1  SAM Splint Video #2    Using SAM splints to Maximun Effect
  Detailed description of “STOP the BLEED” Steps
Wilderness First Aid P1 P2 P3 P4  P5 P6  Simulated Accident  Kit 
Evac Helicopter
 LF1  LF2  NOLS
 Medical Emergency Kit  P1  P2
Wilderness First Aid (WFA)  National Outdoor Leadership – NOLS

Suggested books to add to your Wilderness First Aid Library

Blog Wilderness First Aid Library

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17. April 2018 · Comments Off on Stop the Bleed! · Categories: Education


Detailed description of Stop the Bleed steps

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29. March 2018 · Comments Off on April 28, 2018 Squaw Butte Clinic · Categories: Around The Campfire

Squaw Butte 2018 Pack Clinic.PDF

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26. March 2018 · Comments Off on Analysis Shows 290 Million Annual Visits to Public Lands in Western States · Categories: Public Lands
 The Center for Western Priorities released a new report, 290 Million Reasons to Invest in America’s Public Lands, estimating that U.S. public lands in Western states see more than 290 million visits each year.

The report represents a first-of-its-kind analysis of total annual visitation to U.S. public lands in 11 Western states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. Visitation to all types of public lands and waters administered by the four U.S. land management agencies — National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service — were considered in the report.

 

“We knew public lands are popular, but we were surprised to learn just how deep America’s love for our public lands runs,” said Lucy Livesay, Policy and Communications Manager at the Center for Western Priorities, who led the research. “To put it in context, 290 million visits is equivalent to nearly 90 percent of the entire population of the United States. It’s more than the amount of people who visited zoos and aquariums, watched the Super Bowl, or attended every NFL, NBA and MLB game combined last season. In a country with so many recreation, leisure, and entertainment options, our public lands take a backseat to none.”

According to the report, the popularity of public lands continues to grow. National park visits in the 11 Western states jumped from 81 million in 2006 to more than 108 million in 2017. National monument visits have nearly tripled since 2000.

The popularity of national public lands is a significant factor in their local economic impact, according to the report. A recent study by the Outdoor Industry Association found the outdoor industry contributes $887 billion in consumer spending to the national economy and supports 7.6 million jobs across the country. The positive economic impact of public lands is especially outsized in Western states.

Despite the enormous and growing popularity of U.S. public lands across the West, they are being funded and protected less by President Trump and his administration.

According to the analysis, funding for all federal land management agencies as a percentage of the annual discretionary budget has declined since 2000. President Trump’s 2019 budget proposes a 16 percent cut to the U.S. Department of Interior. At the same time the Trump administration has undertaken an unprecedented attack on public lands by eliminating more than 2 million acres of national monuments in southern Utah, an action facing multiple legal challenges.

“The way we fund and protect our public lands should reflect the high regard Americans hold them in and the value they return to our local economies and way of life in the West,” said Jennifer Rokala, Executive Director at the Center for Western Priorities. “That’s not the case today under the Trump administration and this report shows 290 million reasons why our policies and priorities need to change.”

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19. March 2018 · Comments Off on Forest Service Announces 15 Trail Priority Areas · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Subject: Forest Service Announces 15 Trail Priority Areas

Did you know the Forest Service has designated 15 Trail Priority Areas as required under the National Forest System Trail Stewardship Act of 2016? You can read the announcement below. These trail priority areas should receive additional agency focus and be learning laboratories for involving partners and volunteers in trail maintenance. You can learn more about the National Forest Trails Stewardship Act on our website by clicking this link.

NWSA will help stewardship groups meet this challenge through our National Forest Trails Stewardship Funding. Check out the Trail Funding application and other program information on our website at http://www.wildernessalliance.org/trail_funding. Here you will find the application materials, Fact Sheets, and other information to help your organization put a project proposal together.

USDA Secretary announces infrastructure improvements for forest system trails Focused work will help agency reduce a maintenance backlog and make trails safer for users.

WASHINGTON, FEB 16, 2018 – U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today announced the selection of 15 priority areas to help address the more than $300 million trail maintenance backlog on national forests and grasslands.
Focused trail work in these areas, bolstered by partners and volunteers, is expected to help address needed infrastructure work so that trails managed by USDA Forest Service can be accessed and safely enjoyed by a wide variety of trails enthusiasts. About 25 percent of agency trails fit those standards while the condition of other trails lag behind.

“Our nation’s trails are a vital part of the American landscape and rural economies, and these priority areas are a major first step in USDA’s on-the-ground responsibility to make trails better and safer,” Secretary Perdue said. “The trail maintenance backlog was years in the making with a combination of factors contributing to the problem, including an outdated funding mechanism that routinely borrows money from programs, such as trails, to combat ongoing wildfires.
“This borrowing from within the agency interferes with other vital work, including ensuring that our more than 158,000 miles of well-loved trails provide access to public lands, do not harm natural resources, and, most importantly, provide safe passage for our users.”
This year the nation celebrates the 50th anniversary of the National Trails Systems Act which established America’s system of national scenic, historic, and recreation trails. A year focused on trails presents a pivotal opportunity for the Forest Service and partners to lead a shift toward a system of sustainable trails that are maintained through even broader shared stewardship.

The priority areas focus on trails that meet the requirements of the National Forest System Trails Stewardship Act of 2016, which calls for the designation of up to 15 high priority areas where a lack of maintenance has led to reduced access to public land; increased risk of harm to natural resources; public safety hazards; impassable trails; or increased future trail maintenance costs. The act also requires the Forest Service to “significantly increase the role of volunteers and partners in trail maintenance” and to aim to double trail maintenance accomplished by volunteers and partners.
Shared stewardship to achieve on-the-ground results has long been core to Forest Service’s approach to trail maintenance, as demonstrated by partner groups such as the Pacific Crest Trail Association and the Appalachian Trail Conservancy.

“Our communities, volunteers and partners know that trails play an important role in the health of local economies and of millions of people nationwide, which means the enormity of our trail maintenance backlog must be adequately addressed now,” said USDA Forest Service Chief Tony Tooke. “The agency has a commitment to be a good neighbor, recognizing that people and communities rely on these trails to connect with each other and with nature.”
Each year, more than 84 million people get outside to explore, exercise and play on trails across national forests and grasslands and visits to these places help to generate 143,000 jobs annually through the recreation economy and more than $9 million in visitor spending.
The 15 national trail maintenance priority areas encompass large areas of land and each have committed partners to help get the work accomplished. The areas are:

Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex and Adjacent Lands, Montana: The area includes the Bob Marshall, Scapegoat, and Great Bear Wilderness Areas and most of the Hungry Horse, Glacier View, and Swan Lake Ranger Districts on the Flathead National Forest in northwest Montana on both sides of the Continental Divide. There are more than 3,200 miles of trails within the area, including about 1,700 wilderness miles.

Methow Valley Ranger District, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, Washington: Methow Valley is a rural recreation-based community surrounded by more than 1.3 million acres of managed by the Forest Service. The area includes trails through the Pasayten and Lake Chelan-Sawtooth Wilderness Areas and more than 130 miles of National Pacific Crest and Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trails.

Hells Canyon National Recreation Area and Eagle Cap Wilderness, Idaho and Oregon: This area includes more than 1,200 miles of trail and the deepest river canyon in North America as well as the remote alpine terrain of the Seven Devil’s mountain range. The area also has 350,000 acres in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, the largest in Oregon.

Central Idaho Wilderness Complex, Idaho and Montana: The area includes about 9,600 miles of trails through the Frank Church River of No Return; Gospel Hump; most of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness areas; portions of the Payette, Salmon-Challis, Nez Perce and Clearwater national forests; and most of the surrounding lands. The trails inside and outside of wilderness form a network of routes that give access into some of the most remote country in the Lower 48.

Continental Divide National Scenic Trail, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico: The trail’s 3,100 continuous miles follows the spine of the Rocky Mountains from Mexico to Canada, including more than 1,900 miles of trails across 20 national forests. The trail runs a diverse route with some sections in designated wilderness areas and others running through towns, providing those communities with the opportunity to boost the local economy with tourism dollars.

Wyoming Forest Gateway Communities: Nearly 1,000 miles of trail stretch across the almost 10 million acres of agency-managed lands in Wyoming, which include six national forests and one national grassland. The contribution to the state’s outdoor recreation economy is therefore extremely important in the state.

Northern California Wilderness, Marble Mountain and Trinity Alps: There are more than 700 miles of trails through these wilderness areas, which are characterized by very steep mountain terrain in fire-dependent ecosystems that are subject to heavy winter rainfall and/or snow. As such, they are subject to threat from flooding, washout, landslide and other erosion type events which, combined with wildfires, wash out trails and obstruct passage.

Angeles National Forest, California: The area, which includes nearly 1,000 miles of trails, is immediately adjacent to the greater Los Angeles area where 15 million people livewithin 90 minutes and more than 3 million visit. Many of those visitors are young people from disadvantaged communities without local parks.

Greater Prescott Trail System, Arizona: This 300-mile system of trails is a demonstration of work between the Forest Service and multiple partners. The system is integrated with all public lands at the federal, state and local level to generate a community-based trail system.

Sedona Red Rock Ranger District Trail System, Coconino National Forest, Arizona: About 400 miles of trail provide a wide diversity of experiences with year-round trail opportunities, including world-class mountain biking in cooler months and streamside hiking in the heat of the summer.

Colorado Fourteeners: Each year, hundreds of thousands of hikers trek along over 200 miles of trail to access Colorado’s mountains that are higher than 14,000 feet. The Forest Service manages 48 of the 54 fourteeners, as they are commonly called.

Superior National Forest, Minnesota: The more than 2,300 miles of trail on this forest have faced many catastrophic events, including large fires and a major wind storm downed millions of trees in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in 1999. A similar storm in 2016 reached winds up to 85 mph and toppled trees on several thousand acres and made the western 13 miles of Kekekabic Trail impassible.

White Mountain National Forest Partner Complex, Maine and New Hampshire: Approximately 600 miles of non-motorized trails are maintained by partners. Another 600 miles of motorized snowmobile trails are adopted and maintained by several clubs. Much of that work centers on providing safe public access to the mountain and valleys of New Hampshire and Maine.

Southern Appalachians Capacity Enhancement Model, Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia: The more than 6,300 miles of trails in this sub region include some of the most heavily used trails in the country yet only 28 percent meet or exceed agency standards. The work required to bring these trails to standard will require every tool available from partner and volunteer skills to contracts with professional trail builders.

Iditarod National Historic Trail Southern Trek, Alaska: In southcentral Alaska, the Southern Trek is in close proximity to more than half the state’s population and connects with one of the most heavily traveled highways in the state. The Chugach National Forest and partners are restoring and developing more than 180 miles of the trail system, connecting the communities of Seward, Moose Pass, Whittier, and Girdwood.

For more information about the USDA Forest Service visit http://www.fs.fed.us/.

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19. March 2018 · Comments Off on Fun Ride – Wilson Creek Trail Head · Categories: Fun Rides

On March 18, 2018 eighteen members and guest of Squaw Butte met at the BLM parking lot of the Wilson Creek Trail head. The area had been in a winter storm warning only 48 hours before but the forecast hinted at a few hours of blue skies and light breezes. It didn’t take long for stock to be saddled and warm hats to be found and the first of three group started up the trail. A loop was planned that went up the Wilson creek trail, then turned east and crossed the road and worked its way back to the trail head following a series of gullies and 4-wheeler roads.When all were back at the trailers after a nice four hour ride, finger food was shared and stories told. See more Pictures  See Video

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14. March 2018 · Comments Off on USFS Saw Policy Program Manager Region 1&4 (update) · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

BCHI Members,

Thank you so much for the opportunity to join you, the State Board of Directors and also members of BCHI at your annual state convention! It was great to meet you all and learn more about the great work the chapters are doing throughout Idaho, as well as share information and answer questions about the Forest Service’s saw policy.

I’m always amazed at the dedication and amount of volunteer and partner work that BCH members give – you are all very much appreciated not only for the time and talent you give, but also for your passion for public lands. Thank you!

Here’s some additional follow-up items for everyone:

• The first is a letter from our Regional Forester here in R1 announcing our new Northern Region Wilderness Skills Institute, that will be occurring in Powell, ID the week of May 21-25; additional information is also in this email if folks scroll below. If folks have an interest, I would recommend signing up soon, per the highlighted link below, as I anticipate the sessions will fill up fast.

• The name of the R4 Saw Program Manager is Brian Burbridge and he can be reached at phone: 801-531-5320 or bburbridge@fs.fed.us. I would recommend that local chapters first contact the primary ranger district staff that they work with to see about saw training opportunities locally; if none are available, the district staff can work with/contact Brian to see about setting something up or seeing where trainings are being offered that folks can attend.

• The R1 Saw Program Manager is Todd Wilson. He is working with local ranger districts directly to set up saw trainings so I would recommend that chapters on the Idaho Panhandle and Nez Perce Clearwater NFs work directly with their local unit contacts first or with BCH volunteer sawyers Jerry Lange and Joe Robinson re: setting something up.

o R1 (Northern Region) covers the Idaho Panhandle NF and the Nez Perce Clearwater NF

o R4 (Intermountain Region) covers the Payette, Boise, Salmon Challis, Sawtooth, and Caribou Targee NFs

o It’s important to note that BCH volunteer C level instructor or evaluator sawyers need to coordinate with local FS units to set up cutting areas for training; volunteer sawyers also need a letter of designation from the Regional Saw Program Manager in order to instruct/evaluate. The FS (either FS line officer, Regional Saw Program Manager, or delegated forest/district saw program coordinator) is the “certifying official” who signs the saw card, based on recommendations from the saw evaluators.

• Conservation United (www.conservationinsurance.com or phone (844-559-8336) is the company that, as of a year ago, sounded like they also offered insurance (workers compensation) coverage for volunteer and partner groups using volunteers. They provide insurance coverage for many youth corps groups around the country, including youth corps using veterans engaged in hazardous fuels reduction (i.e., chain saw) work, and they had indicated to me that they also can provide insurance for volunteers. Not sure current status/current policies they offer but folks might want to visit with them to see what they currently offer.

Hope this is helpful for folks. Again, really appreciated being able to share some information on the saw policy and spend some time together. I look forward to seeing you all again soon!

Informal Letter 1 Signature          Saw Policy Key Points – Volunteers and Partners

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14. March 2018 · Comments Off on Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute · Categories: Education

Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute

Apply to attend the 2018 Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute!

Where: Powell Ranger Station, Powell, Idaho

When: May 21, 2018 – May 25, 2018

What: A skills building opportunity for wilderness field staff.

How: Select a Track (1, 2, 3, 4 or 5) and a lodging option below and click on the Apply Now button to be taken to registration.

Deadline: The application period will close April 9, 2018 at 5:00 pm Mountain Daylight Time.

Questions: Contact Jimmy Gaudry or Heather MacSlarrow with questions.

APPLY NOW

The Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute is for agency staff and partner organizations that work in wilderness.  This week long course offers five levels of training, with plenty of time for networking and growing community in between.

Tracks

The Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute offers 5 tracks, based on your level of experience and the skills you would like to gain.  Due to limited capacity, not every applicant may be able to attend their first choice Track.  Therefore, during the application process, you will identify your top two choices for which Track you would like to be in.  PLEASE NOTE the required pre-requisites for each track, and be prepared to furnish the appropriate documents and certifications when asked.  Information about each Track is as follows:

TRACK ONE:  Advanced Crosscut Saw and Axemanship; and Crosscut Saw and Axe Train the Trainer Course

PRE-REQUISITE: Letter of recommendation from line officer (agency staff) or direct supervisor (partner organizations).

Participants will learn policy, vernacular, OSHA requirements, delegations and designations as well as other requirements for navigating saw policy.  They will also learn about the new curriculum, new teaching aids, new methodologies and processes for saw training (1/2 day).  There will then be a field focus on axemanship, complex and precision falling, OHLEC, complex bucking, removing hung trees (with and without rigging) and following the new education methodology (1.5 days).  The newly certified educators will the put on a class for new sawyers (2 days).

TRACK TWO: Crosscut Saw B Bucking and First Aid/CPR

PRE-REQUISITE: None.

This session is focused on gaining the qualifications needed to be a crosscut saw B bucker.  Participants will also learn basic wilderness stewardship principles, leave no trace, horsemanship, and trail maintenance techniques.

The first aid/cpr session will provide participants with basic first aid and CPR skills required to work with a crosscut saw. 

The A/B Crosscut Certification Course provides students with both classroom-based instruction and field experience in the use of the crosscut saws and axes. Students will learn how to safely utilize these tools in a trail maintenance capacity. The course will cover tool history, best practices in the field, one-on-one instruction in tool use in the field, tool care, safety, and transportation of the tools. Successful completion of this course is required to use these tools on national forest lands while participating in stewardship efforts.

Participants will also learn/review basic wilderness stewardship principles, leave no trace, horsemanship, and trail maintenance techniques. 

This is a field based course so come with appropriate outdoor gear and a sack lunch both days.  If you have a favorite set of tools please bring those as well.

TRACK THREE: Crosscut Saw B Bucking and Basic Trail Maintenance

PRE-REQUISITE: First Aid/CPR Card.

This session is focused on gaining the qualifications needed to be a crosscut saw B bucker.  Participants will also learn basic wilderness stewardship principles, leave no trace, horsemanship, and trail maintenance techniques.

The basic trail maintenance session will provide…

The A/B Crosscut Certification Course provides students with both classroom-based instruction and field experience in the use of the crosscut saws and axes. Students will learn how to safely utilize these tools in a trail maintenance capacity. The course will cover tool history, best practices in the field, one-on-one instruction in tool use in the field, tool care, safety, and transportation of the tools. Successful completion of this course is required to use these tools on national forest lands while participating in stewardship efforts.

Participants will also learn/review basic wilderness stewardship principles, leave no trace, horsemanship, and trail maintenance techniques. 

This is a field based course so come with appropriate outdoor gear and a sack lunch both days.  If you have a favorite set of tools please bring those as well. 

TRACK FOUR: Beginner/Intermediate Wilderness Stewardship

PRE-REQUISITE: None.

This session will focus on the skills needed to be a wilderness ranger.  It will provide learning and engagement opportunities for a beginner to intermediate participants.  This session will include fundamentals related to the wilderness act and wilderness character monitoring.  Basic wilderness stewardship principles, roles of the wilderness ranger, making public contacts, backpacking skills, leave no trace, horsemanship, and trail maintenance techniques will also be a part of the session. 

TRACK FIVE:  Intermediate/Advanced Wilderness Stewardship

PRE-REQUISITE: None.

This session will focus on the skills needed to be a wilderness ranger.  It will provide learning opportunities for the intermediate/advanced participants.  A deeper dive into wilderness policy and law, wilderness stewardship performance, and wilderness character monitoring will be included.  It will also allow participants to take on thought provoking topics related to emerging issues, volunteer project management, and minimum requirements decision guides.  Since this is a more advanced session the participants may be asked to lead a session or discussion. 

Lodging

There are two types of lodging available – tent camping (nestled amongst the pines and under the stars on the banks of the Wild and Scenic Lochsa River), or indoor bunkhouse style lodging.  There are a limited number of indoor spaces.  Please state your preference when submitting your application, and tell us about any special accomodations you may need.

Food

Food is not provided.  It will be up to each participant or participant group to furnish their own food.  There is limited indoor cooking space, as well as outside areas suitable for camp stoves, grills, and fires.

What to Bring, How to Get There, and More Information

An informational packet will be mailed to all participants at least two weeks prior to the start of the Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute that lines out what to bring, how to get to training, and more important information.

Timeline

Application Period: March 9, 2018 – April 9, 2018

Application Review: April 9, 2018 – April 22, 2018

Applicant Notification: April 23, 2018

Informational Packet E-Mailed to Participants: May 7, 2018

Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute: May 21, 2018 – May 25, 2018

APPLY NOW

===========================================

Subject: Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute – Applications Due by April 9

Please share with employees and partners.  See link for more information.

The Northern Region will host the Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute (NRWSI) in cooperation with partners from across the Region. The dates for the NRWSI will be May 21 – 25, and it will be held at the historic Powell Ranger Station in Powell, Idaho.

This training is open to all Forest Service employees and partners. There may be a need to limit the number of participants in each session. Applying early is highly encouraged.

Applications may be submitted until April 9, 2018. A description of the sessions are offered along with application information can be found at Northern Rockies Wilderness Skills Institute.

For information concerning the NRWSI, contact Jimmy Gaudry at jcgaudry@fs.fed.us, Kent Wellner at kwellner@fs.fed.us, or Joni Packard at jpackard@fs.fed.us.

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11. March 2018 · Comments Off on 2018 BCHI Spring Convention – Clarkston, WA · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

The 2018 BCHI Spring Board Meeting & Convention was hosted by the “Twin Rivers” chapter in Clarkston, WA.( Clarkston is a city in Asotin County, Washington, United States. It is part of the Lewiston metropolitan area, and is located west of Lewiston, Idaho, across the Snake River. The population of Clarkston was 7,229 in 2010 census.) The Board Meeting was held on Friday March 9th and was attended by members, Bill & Marybeth Conger, Phil & Kay Ryan, Lynn & Peggy Garner.  Bill Holt attended the BCHI Foundation meeting during the same time.

Rob Adams arrived around 16:30 just at the meeting was breaking up and joined the group with the addition of Christ Holt for happy hour. During the social hour members from the various chapter swapped stories and planned where to get dinner.

Starting sharply at 08:00 Saturday morning, Bill Conger graveled the convention to order and issues talked about at the board meeting were voted on. A guest speaker from district one of the USFS talked about progress being made on the national sawyer program and how both district one and four were doing implementing it. Jeff Halligran from the “Idaho Trails Association” talked about his organization, requested help with packing support, and gave an interesting presentation on cross cut saws.

Lunch was served and the afternoon was spent in various training sessions, and group discussions. While all this was going on, BCHI members were checking out the auction items.  After a great dinner of either prime rib or seasoned chicken breast, the winners of the chapter displays and photo contests were announced.

Squaw Butte was awarded second place in the chapter displays (see other displays) and took top honors in the photo contest.

Laurie Bryan took both first and second prizes for her photo’s of Janelle Weeks & Shelly Duff. David Benson’s mule picture took a first place in the animal division and Rob Adams picture of Payette sticking his tongue out won third prize.
The auction followed, with lively bidding that was somewhat hampered by the high noise level in the room. Some great items were taken home by members and the coffers of the foundation were expanded.

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08. March 2018 · Comments Off on USFS Woman – A PBS New Hour Report · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

They reported sexual harassment. Then the retaliation began

 

Michaela Myers said she was first groped by her supervisor after a crew pizza party last summer, shortly after starting a new job as a firefighter with the U.S. Forest Service. She was 22 and excited about the job. She had worked out diligently to prepare for the season, running and hiking with a heavy pack. She is from the Pacific Northwest, and had always loved the outdoors and a challenge.

She remembers her supervisor, Drew DeLozier, a Forest Service veteran, offering her beers at a crew member’s house after dinner. He told her he was glad she was on the crew because she was “sexy” and had “a nice ass,” she said. According to her account, he led her to a couch, rubbed her butt as she sat down, and slid his hand between her legs. Myers was shocked and upset, but didn’t stop him. She had heard from other crew members that DeLozier could fly off the handle, and didn’t want to make a scene.

“You don’t feel like you can say ‘no’ loudly to your supervisor,” she said. “I keep looking back on it and wishing I could have just punched him or something.”According to Myers, the harassment and groping continued for the rest of the summer. When she confided in a fellow crew member, he told her this was an unfortunate reality for a female firefighter. She had a choice, she recalls him saying: report it and face retaliation, or do nothing and stay in fire.

But in September, after the end of her three-month season in Oregon, Myers had enough. She reported the harassment to the United States Department of Agriculture, the Forest Service’s parent agency. In October, she provided a sworn statement to a USDA investigator detailing all the allegations. At first, Myers found the Human Resource department’s response encouraging. She was optimistic action would be taken. But two months later, the Forest Service sent her a letter that said the investigation was complete, no misconduct had been found, and the case was closed.

Myers was furious.

“This means they don’t believe me that I was sexually harassed,” she said. “Or they don’t care.”

When reached by phone, DeLozier, who still works for the Forest Service, said he was made aware of the allegations. “I was cleared of all wrongdoing,” he said.‘We all live in this fear’
Harassment of women in the Forest Service has been a problem for years. As far back as 1972, women have joined together to file class action complaints and lawsuits about gender discrimination and sexual harassment. More recently, in 2016, a congressional hearing was held to address the problem within the Forest Service’s California workforce, which had also been the focus of previous complaints. The PBS NewsHour investigated what’s happened since then, and found the problem goes much deeper. READ MORE

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06. March 2018 · Comments Off on 2018 Idaho Sportsman Show · Categories: Around The Campfire, BCHI /BCHA

Guides, outfitters, Public land agencies, non-profits and sportsmen of all stripes converge here for a gear-filled good time. With tips on fishing, hunting, elk calling, and more, there’s plenty to do for those who chase the call of the wild. There’s even stuff for the kids with an archery shoot, live trout pond, and other fun things to hunt out.

For the four days of the Idaho Sportsman show, members from three BCHI Chapters and members of the Idaho Trail Association manned a booth on the east end of row “D” next to the US Forest Service Booth at Expo Idaho (fair grounds). These trail ambassadors handed out information about volunteer trail work and their organizations and talked to many of the shows visitors.

It was also a good time to hang out with other chapter members and talk about the upcoming year.   Members of BCHI who participated: Janelle Weeks, Lisa Krogh, Jim & Bonnie Fox, Gary & Ann Hale, Dan Pryse, Lynn & Peggy Garver, Carmen Tyack, Bill and Marybeth Conger, Nancy Smith, Shannon Schantz, Gary Towle, Donnie & Erin Thornugh, Paul & Jill George, David Benson, Phil & Kay Ryan, Joe Williams, Janine Townsend, Bill Holt, Dick Peterson and Rob Adams.  Bryan DuFosse coordinated the ITA members who worked the booth.

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06. March 2018 · Comments Off on Where the Wild Things Are – Trailmeister Feb 2018 · Categories: Around The Campfire, Fun Rides

Last August in Idaho a woman was attacked by a bear. For weeks afterward, local newspapers printed page upon page about the encounter, warning their readers that dangerous animals were prowling the countryside. What if you were planning a ride or a horse camping trip when you read about this attack? Would you stay home, take extra precautions, or venture elsewhere?

The great counterweight to the lure of the outdoors is the fear of the unknown. What if the weather turns for the worse? What if my horse acts up? What if I become lunch for a grizzly?

Here’s the hard truth. Most people spend entirely too much time and energy worrying about menacing—but low-chance threats like bears, cougars, and wolves, and not nearly enough thought concerning themselves with the dull and common dangers like bees, blisters, and hypothermia. To confirm this theory, take a quick test. How many times have you been mauled by a bear or a mountain lion? Now compare that figure with the number of times you’ve forgotten a piece of tack, dealt with an unruly horse, or encountered bees on a ride.One reason that riders and campers worry about the wrong things is largely the fault of the media, and writers like me. Adding the phrase “When Grizzlies Attack!” to a title sells more magazine copies, even if your chance of having a stand-off with a bear is much less than that of having a winning lotto ticket magically appear in your saddlebags.

I’m not suggesting that you ignore potential threats like bears, wolves, and cats, but to drop them a few rungs down the worry list. Obviously, if you’re riding or camping in an active bear area, take sensible precautions like making noise, bear-bagging your food, and avoiding huckleberry thickets. But don’t fixate so much on these critters that you spook at every rustle of the leaves, or even worse, fail to enjoy the ride and the trip. It all comes back to the most important outdoor skill anyone can practice: common sense.

Ignoring the hysteria can be hard to do and less than exciting. On rides with my wife, I’ve been guilty of pointing into the forest and reminding her that there are undoubtedly creatures watching us as they sulk in the darkness. For some reason, Celeste doesn’t seem to appreciate my wickedly keen sense of observation. Here are a few words to the wise. Firstly, don’t alarm your wife, husband, riding partner, or others with tall tales of the abundance of apex predators. Secondly, prioritize your outdoor concerns with the help of these two lists.

Pay More Attention to These…

  • Ensure that you and your animals are in shape and condition for trail riding. 610,000 people die each year from heart disease. When I get off and walk it’ because I need some exercise, not because I’m having a moment.
  • Desensitize your horse to scary situations you may encounter on the trail; such as hikers and bicycles, in a safe environment, such as an arena.
  • Wear a helmet. Using data from the National Trauma Databank between 2003 and 2012, researchers found that equestrian sports contributed to the highest percentage of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) for adults.
  • Keep bugs away by applying a DEET-based insect repellant. – According to the World Health Organization, in 2016 there were 94 deaths from the mosquito-borne West Nile Virus. And over 600,000 people die each year after being bitten by mosquitoes bearing the deadly malaria parasite.
  • Have an emergency plan in case a ride becomes “eventful.”
  • The non-human creatures that cause more American deaths than any other are bees and wasps. In a typical year, nearly 100 US deaths are caused by bee stings. This number is probably underestimated, as some bee sting deaths are erroneously attributed to heart attacks, sunstroke and other causes. FAST FACT – Though bees take the crown as America’s most lethal animal, they are not naturally aggressive creatures, and when they attack, they do so in defense against a perceived threat. The key to avoiding bee stings is to steer clear of hives and nests.

Worry Less About These…

  • Bears – Black and grizzly bears have been responsible for 48 fatalities over the past 20 years. Compare that to the 40,200 traffic deaths recorded in 2016 alone.
  • Wolves – These wild canids are much less lethal than man’s best “friends” which kill 30-40 people every year. Since 1900 wolves have been responsible for a total of 4 deaths in North America.
  • Mountain Lions / Cougars – There have been 25 cougar fatalities in the one hundred and twenty-seven years since records have been kept on the subject. Compare that to the 262 rodent spread hantavirus deaths since 1993.

Next month we’ll discuss preparing for your first backcountry horse camping trip. Until then visit www.TrailMeister.com for the largest and most comprehensive guide to horse trails, horse camps, and the tips and knowledge to enjoy them! In February, you’ll also find me teaching the tips and tricks of trail riding at clinics in Idaho and Tennessee. Check the website for details.

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21. February 2018 · Comments Off on Idaho Horse Council – Equine Brand Inspections · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Idaho Horse Council [ idahohorsecouncil@yahoo.com ]
Sent: Monday, February 19, 2018 12:00 PM
Subject: Idaho Brand Inspection

Members we need your help!

Representative Judy Boyle will be introducing a Bill soon that will eliminate the need to get a Brand Inspection on equine in Idaho.

She did not make the industry aware of this bill, nor why she felt the need to try and eliminate Brand Inspections for Equine in Idaho.

Please contact Representative Boyle and your legislature representative. It’s important the Industry for the following reasons to continue to have Brand Inspections. Please post on face book pages and email your equine friends and please Call or email your representatives.

Representative Judy Boyle jboyle@house.idaho.gov
Home (208) 355-3225
Bus (208) 355-3225
FAX (208) 355-3225
H602 Statement of Purpose         H0602 brand inspections
Value of Brand Inspections
Brands are livestock’s return address. They are important because:
• They provide evidence of ownership
• They deter theft
• They enable brand inspectors and law enforcement personnel to return stolen or missing livestock to their owners
• They help resolve conflicts over ownership
Deters theft
• Helps determine ownership
• Enables brand inspectors and law enforcement personnel to return stolen or missing livestock to their owners
• Prevents unlawful sale or transport of livestock
• Facilitates commerce by providing a system of checks and balances that is well understood and valued in the marketplace
• Helps protect the livestock industry by putting trained personnel in the field to keep an eye on the industry

Several of our surrounding States require a Brand Inspection to bring a horse into their State.
In case of a disaster how would we find our livestock?

If Brand inspection for Equine is eliminated the Idaho Horse Board would no longer be able to grant funds on a yearly basis ..Since 1989 the Idaho Horse Board has granted $478,495.for Research, Education and Promotion for Equine Groups in Idaho .

If she eliminated brand inspections on Equine then would they need to reclassify the definition of livestock as the law now exists. Equine may no longer be classified as “Livestock.”

Thank You
Debbie Amsden
Executive Director
Idaho Horse Council
(208) 465-5477
idahohorsecouncil.com

~-~-~-~-~

BCHI Chapters: Idaho Brand Inspection

Directors and Presidents, please encourage your members to contact their State Legislators regarding this purposed bill which I have attached along with Boyle’s Statement of Purpose for the Bill. Boyle states that passage of this bill would save the Brand Department $528,000 which I understand from a member of the Brand Board is not correct. I was told the savings would be about $300,000.

The important point to the $300,000 is that what we currently pay for our equine brand inspections does not cover the full cost of conducting these inspections. Therefore other brand inspection fees, such as cattle, are used to subsidize ours which means someday we should expect to pay our true costs.

Bill Conger
BCHI Chairman
208-369-0768
chairman@bchi.org

 

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15. February 2018 · Comments Off on Trump pushes 90% cut to America’s most important public lands program · Categories: Public Lands

Here’s what the Land and Water Conservation Fund does

As part of a budget proposal that amounts to a Valentine to special interests, the Trump administration wants devastating cuts to the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which has been called America’s most important conservation tool. Learn more here.

President Trump’s Fiscal Year 2019 federal budget proposal would cut the long-running and popular Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) to the bone, reducing its budget by roughly 90%. LWCF was designed so there would always be money available for its core purpose of protecting land in order to complete national parks, forests, wildlife refuges and other protected sites, without burdening American taxpayers. For over 50 years, it has drawn on revenues from oil and gas drilling on the Outer Continental Shelf to pay into thousands of projects nationwide, gaining popularity across the political spectrum.

But despite broad bipartisan support for the program, billions of dollars have been diverted from the Land and Water Conservation Fund by Congress over the course of the program’s life to pay for unrelated expenses, leaving many outdoor projects unfinished and parcels of land unprotected. In recent years, funding for LWCF has hovered around one-third of the full authorized level, even as new pressures intrude on wildlands and shared spaces become developed, fragmented or otherwise damaged.

The Trump proposal would devastate this popular program already hanging on for dear life, representing the single largest cut in the already weakened Department of the Interior’s budget. We will ask lawmakers to reject Trump’s reckless budget and persist with a larger campaign to demand permanent reauthorization and full funding for LWCF.
READ MORE

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04. February 2018 · Comments Off on This year’s 40 years down the trail convention has something new for all you amazing BCHI members · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

This year’s 40 years down the trail convention has something new for all you amazing BCHI members, says BCHI Education chair, Marybeth Conger.

Saturday, March 10th from 1:00 until 4:30, there will be the first ever BCHI Chapter Member Training workshops. Training covers various chapter positions and other pertinent educational topics. These training workshops are listed below along with the name of the instructor.

Chapter President/ Vice President– Bill Conger and Rod Parks

Chapter Secretary– Debbie Samovar

Chapter Treasurer– Kay Ryan

BCHI Foundation and Amazon Smile fundraising– Chris Reed and Bill Holt

Volunteer Hours reporting– Rod Parks

Back country Horseman of America– Steve Didier

Idaho Horse Council & BCHI Website– Raenette Didier and Jill Nebeker

Chapter Education Chair– Marybeth Conger and Karen Kimball

 

Also, at the Friday, March 9th State Board of Director meeting, Steve Didier is presenting to the directors a training workshop covering State Director/National Director. Members are welcome to attend too. So please come join us at this year convention for some great learning, fun, and comradery . The workshop schedule will be posted on the BCHI website too. If anyone has questions, about the training workshops, please reach out to Marybeth Conger at b.mbconger@gmail.com.

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31. January 2018 · Comments Off on Utah’s approach to public lands won’t work · Categories: Public Lands

New Mexico exemplifies the risk of managing lands at the whim of local interests.

by Tom Ribe  Link to online Posting

Tom Ribe is a contributor to Writers on the Range, the opinion service of High Country News. He writes from his office in the wildland-urban interface in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Two days after President Donald Trump signed an executive order reducing Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument by half, Utah Republican Rep. Chris Stewart introduced a bill in the House that would put local politicians in charge of the public lands cut away from the monument.

One tenet of conservative public-land policy orthodoxy is that local control of public lands will improve the wellbeing of local residents. Yet the movement to auction off federal lands or transfer them to state or county control has repeatedly run aground because public lands are overwhelming popular among Americans. Other conservative efforts have been sought to neutralize federal agencies.

Stewart’s Grand Staircase-Escalante Enhancement Act is one of these new approaches. If passed by the House, it would create a ‘management council’ made up of seven local county commissioners and state legislators appointed by the president of the United States. One member would come from the Department of the Interior. The management council would set policy for two small Bureau of Land Management national monuments and one new national park and preserve under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service. The three areas lie within what once was the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument created by President Bill Clinton and managed by the BLM.

Stewart’s legislation states that federal land managers “shall adhere” to management plans created by the management council. If recent experience with a similar scheme at the Valles Caldera National Preserve in northern New Mexico is any guide, this approach is doomed to failure. Valles Caldera: About 1.25 million years ago, a spectacular volcanic eruption created the 13-mile wide circular depression now known as the Valles Caldera.  The preserve is known for its huge mountain meadows, abundant wildlife, and meandering streams. The area also preserves the homeland of ancestral native peoples and embraces a rich ranching history.

In 2000, after a 100,000-acre private parcel surrounded by Forest Service and National Park Service land came up for sale near Santa Fe, public pressure encouraged the New Mexico congressional delegation to buy it for the public. But Sen. Pete Domenici, R-N.M., insisted that a presidentially appointed, mostly private-sector board of trustees set policy for the new preserve as an “experiment” in management. Federal employees would carry out the board’s policy.

Problems dogged the experiment from the start. Having the president appoint board members politicized the board. When Republicans controlled the House of Representatives, ranching-oriented board members were selected; when Democrats controlled the House, conservationists and academics ran the board. The federal staff had to answer to nine ever-changing bosses whose edicts sometimes conflicted with the federal laws that apply to public lands.

Stewart’s bill would ensure that only Republicans would be appointed to the management board — unless some seismic shift were to happen in Utah politics. Lands owned by all Americans would be governed by local people with local interests, and if the management council mandated policies that violated federal laws, the federal staff would have a choice of either violating the law or disobeying their local bosses. One can imagine the lawsuits likely to follow.

Stewart would clearly prefer to transfer these lands to county ownership. But that would run counter to strong public support for federal land management, and it would upset the tourism-oriented businesses that have thrived ever since Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument began drawing tourists and boosting property values.

Stewart is hoping to mollify these business interests by creating a new little national park. Yet this so-called park mandates livestock grazing and hunting and trapping, and it would be controlled by state game officials and members of the management council. The mandates could force the National Park Service to violate its own Organic Act, opening up both the management council and the federal government to lawsuits.

Stewart’s bill, which has three co-sponsors from Utah, mandates livestock grazing “in perpetuity” on all the lands in question, but makes no mention of administrative costs or the collateral damage of livestock grazing in a rocky desert where little forage grows. Grazing can be mandated, but what happens when there’s a drought?

The public in New Mexico, after 15 years, was frustrated with the “seat of the pants” decision-making by the board of trustees at the Valles Caldera National Preserve. In 2015, Congress transferred the preserve to the National Park Service, which imposed its standard management structure.

Stewart’s bill, combined with Trump’s evisceration of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, may advance conservative public-lands ideology. But neither action advances the interests of the public, and both create far more problems than they pretend to solve.

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31. January 2018 · Comments Off on 2018 Tow Ratings · Categories: Around The Campfire


TrailerLifeTowGuide2018.pdf

 

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29. January 2018 · Comments Off on What are Public Lands · Categories: Public Lands

There has been a lot of attention recently about Public Lands and where America is headed with the management of those lands. Further, anyone who recreates on Americas public lands is often exposed to unfamiliar terms and may not understand the differences. Following is a brief description to give you a working understanding of the differences and what that means to you.

First, what are “Public Lands”? These are the lands that are owned “equally” by all Americans. There are 618 million acres of public land across the U.S., with a significant portion in Alaska and the western U.S. The total U.S. land base is 2.27 billion acres in size. These federal public lands are managed in trust for us, (citizens of the U.S.) by the Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Park Service and the Wildlife Refuge System for current and future generations.

“Front country” is not a commonly used term, but is generally any public lands that are relatively accessible by means such as motor vehicles, boats, bicycles, hiking, horseback and aircraft and are usually within a short distance of roads. Generally, these lands provide a multitude of recreational activities. Camping may be in developed or dispersed/undeveloped areas. Logging, grazing and mining are often permitted on these lands as well. These are often highly used areas where it is common to see other people and activities.

“Backcountry” is generally the area beyond what is Front country. Pretty vague, but accurate. There is no specific line or map designation where this starts or ends. Access is more challenging and is usually by a trail or cross-country travel and at a further distance from roads and trailheads. Access may be allowed by the same list as above, but with greater responsibility on the user as trails receive less maintenance. In addition, the safety and welfare of each recreationist to care for themselves is increased. Camping is usually in dispersed sites. You would expect to see fewer people and activities than in the Front country.

“Roadless Areas” had their beginnings when Primitive Areas were established in the 1920’s. The idea was to preserve some lands in a roadless condition at a time when automobiles and road building was rapidly expanding. As time progressed, Roadless Areas have been challenged legally and politically as to which lands should remain or be opened. Currently, there is about 58 million acres of unroaded forests. There is about 380,000 miles of roads on Forest Service lands. In comparison, the Interstate Highway system has about 47,000 miles of road.

Unlike Front country and Backcountry, “Wilderness” is defined and receives that highest level of land protection. While some may get a “wilderness experience” in the Front country or Backcountry or a Park, true Wilderness is a specific geographic area and can only be established or “Designated” by an act of Congress. The Wilderness Act of 1964 put into law what is required to be a “Designated Wilderness”. It states how it will be managed and what modes of access or travel are acceptable. The Act requires that it be managed to protect its natural condition, where it is untrammeled by man. It is to maintain its primeval character, shaped by the forces of nature with man’s work substantially unnoticeable. The purposes will be to provide solitude, and escape from mechanized use and maintain historic uses.

Three more terms that you may hear. “Recommended Wilderness” is generally lands identified on Forest Plans or agency plans that recommend specific areas for Wilderness Designation by Congress. “Proposed Wilderness” is generally lands that have been submitted to Congress for Wilderness consideration, a step closer than recommended. However, these two terms can mean the same thing depending on the agency. Finally, “Wilderness Study Areas” or WSA’s are areas that are inventoried and undergoing the Wilderness review process. They are lands that should be managed to preserve the character or special attributes that made them a WSA.

Parks generally have defined geographic areas which are indicated on maps. The recreational uses within a Park are often highly regulated due to a significant amount of visitor use. There are 58 National Parks, and most are associated with a specific national treasure. Interestingly, some iconic National Parks like Yellowstone, Grand Teton and Glacier and others are NOT designated Wilderness. They are “recommended wilderness” but to date, Congress has not given them the additional level of protection.

Parks can be managed by a city, state, private or federal entity. The simplest definition comes from Wikipedia: A “Park” is an area of natural, semi-natural or planted space set aside for human enjoyment and recreation or for the protection of wildlife or natural habitats. It may consist of grassy areas, rocks, soil and trees, but may also contain buildings and other artifacts such as monuments, fountains or playground structures.

The vast majority of our public lands are managed under the multi-use designation that includes both the Front country and Backcountry. This allows for a multitude of activities to be offered on the majority of our Public Lands. Only about 3% of the lower 48 states land base is designated Wilderness.

Submitted by: Mack Long
Mission Valley BCH, BCH Montana, Education Chairman BCH of America

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23. January 2018 · Comments Off on IWF – Currently, Your Right To Access Public Areas is Not Protected · Categories: Public Lands


You read that right! There currently exists no Idaho law protecting your right to access public areas that you pay for. That means anyone can barricade a public tract and prevent your horse, ATV, or motorcycle from passage without fear of repercussion.  And even more common, Idaho sportsmen are running into “NO TRESPASSING” signs on public lands and waters that they have every right to access.  Don’t believe it?  Check out this news story and the video of an encounter with an armed security guard patrolling a Forest Service road.

Right now, for instance, public funds can be used to purchase and maintain permanent, motorized public access on a road.  Anyone can physically obstruct that road and block your access without fear of repercussion. Imagine your disappointment when you draw a coveted elk tag only to show up on opening day to find a locked gate across a public road.  Sure you can call the local sheriff.  But with extremely limited funding, and perpetrators with deep pocketbooks, local law enforcement simply can’t prioritize prosecuting these types of cases.

The scenarios are endless, but one thing is for sure, your right to access public property is not secure.  IWF has been working with legislators, motorized recreation groups, and sportsman groups to close this loophole and create a succinct amendment to an existing law that will put the power of protecting public access in the people’s hands. To review the most updated version of the proposed legislation click here.

Have you ever seen signs or physical barriers to impeding access your public lands? Submit your story below and we will deliver your comments to our legislators.  Link to IWF website

Rep. Labrador Co-Sponsors Bill To Cease Creation of New Salmon Recovery Plans
Federal Bill Will Block Idaho Salmon and Steelhead Recovery
With D.C. Vote, Idaho’s Rep. Labrador Reveals Intentions With Public Lands
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16. January 2018 · Comments Off on Trail Bridge Catalog – USFS/BLM · Categories: Public Lands, Work Parties and Projects

Standard Trail Bridge Drawings and Design Aids

The Forest Service has standard drawings and design aids for the construction of trail bridges. The standard drawings/design aids have been designed and developed in accordance with Forest Service Manual and Forest Service Handbook directions. The following information is provided FOR REFERENCE ONLY.

All bridge drawings should be approved for each specific bridge by a qualified engineer with trail bridge design experience. Drawings are intended to provide ideas for layout and detailing. No drawing or detail should be used for construction without design review by a qualified engineer. Forest Service bridges must be approved and/or designed by the Forest Service engineer or manager responsible for engineering.

The drawings are not meant to be used as individual sheets and should not be used by themselves. A complete drawing package should be downloaded so that the designer has all the required information for reference. All drawings are in PDF format and can be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Currently, only four regions within the Forest Service have standard drawings/design aids. These are Northern Rockies Region (R1), R6 Pacific Northwest Region (R6), Eastern Region (R9), and Alaska Region (R10).

There are two different ways to download the standard drawings/design aids.

The first way is to download a complete set of drawings in a single PDF. This method should only be used with a high-speed Internet connection.

The second way is to download each individual drawing in PDF. This method is recommended for dial-up connections.

Additional Trail Bridge Resources

The following resources give additional information on planning, siting, designing, constructing, inspecting and maintaining trail bridges. All of these items should be included in the decision process to select the best structure for aesthetic design, sustainability and longevity.

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15. January 2018 · Comments Off on 2018 is on target to be a fun and educational year for interested Back Country Horseman of Idaho (BCHI) members · Categories: Around The Campfire, Education

By Education Chair Marybeth Conger


If you are still thinking about attending the Back Country Horseman of Idaho 2018 Directors meeting and Annual convention, please consider that chapter member education has been added to this amazing event. On Saturday March 10, the first ever, BCHI chapter training will be held in the afternoon. Presented by various volunteers, these educational workshops and presentations are open for all members to attend. What a great way to learn more about your current chapter position, or find out details about something you may be interested in the future. Some workshops even cover topics to help us better understand things and help BCHI grow in both numbers and membership development. With your attendance and feedback, we can make this training an annual BCHI event and improve, meeting your educational needs. Get your registration form completed and experience some fun learnings and comradery in additional to all of the other fantastic activities scheduled at the 2018 convention. Hope to see you all there!

April 13 – 15 marks the date for the 2018 Idaho Horse Expo held at the Ford Idaho Park. SBBCH members Bill and Marybeth Conger are some of the clinicians at this year’s event. Their pretentions will cover lightweight recreational packing and camping techniques. In addition, local BCH chapters will again man a BCHI booth. These types of public outreach events help the BCHI organization to grow and educate the public on the wise and sustaining use of our backcountry resource. So come join us if you can!

Karen Kimball graciously volunteered to be a BCHI education co-chair to help coordinate education efforts up north. Making sure chapter education chairs are familiar with all of the relevant education materials maintained by BCHA and its member states is one way for her to accomplish this. Thank you Karen!

Please let the education team know what you plan to accomplish in 2018 so we can spotlight more chapter activities. Education updates on the BCHI website are starting to happen and expect to see more once Marybeth successfully completes the Master Educator course. Well this covers the first quarter and then some. Happy Trails!

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13. January 2018 · Comments Off on Basic Trail Maintenance · Categories: Public Lands

Watch Video

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13. January 2018 · Comments Off on Interactive: Tracking Trump’s anti-public lands crusade · Categories: Public Lands

Wilderness Society
Interactive: Tracking Trump’s anti-public lands crusade
After a chaotic first year, the Trump administration has made it abundantly clear that one goal is to systematically sell out America’s public lands to the fossil fuel industry.

This interactive timeline examines all the actions taken by President Trump and Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to give away our nation’s heritage to energy companies for unfettered drilling, fracking and mining.

How to use the timeline:
Use the bar at the bottom of this page to scroll through our timeline then click on each box for more info.

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08. January 2018 · Comments Off on CPR – 2017 Guidelines · Categories: Education

2017 Guideline for CPR – American Heart Association

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06. January 2018 · Comments Off on Zinke’s World View · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

We’re not long into our hike along the snowy shoreline of Glacier National Park’s Lake McDonald when I pop the question I’ve been wanting to ask Ryan Zinke since he was confirmed as Secretary of the Interior back in March. The way I intended to frame the question had both reach and context, even if it was a little wordy:

“You consistently identify yourself as somebody who models himself on Theodore Roosevelt,” was how I had written the query in my notebook. “You’ve repeatedly called yourself a ‘Teddy Roosevelt guy.’ Roosevelt’s legacy is based on his use of the structure and authority of the federal government to protect landscapes for future generations and to promote multiple use of our public lands. So far in your administration, you’ve made headlines for rolling back protections of federal land under your jurisdiction, most recently national monuments in Utah. Can we expect to see initiatives modeled around Roosevelt’s conservation ethic in the future?”

But what came out of my mouth was: “So, when does TR show up?”  READ MORE

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05. January 2018 · Comments Off on How the West was Lost · Categories: Public Lands

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05. January 2018 · Comments Off on Selway Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation Fall Round-up · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

SBFC News Fall 2017

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05. January 2018 · Comments Off on Highway 52 Cleanup along Black Canyon · Categories: Around The Campfire


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04. January 2018 · Comments Off on Idaho Wildlife Federation 2017 Year in Review · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands


IWF-2017-Holiday-Letter-Final

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29. December 2017 · Comments Off on BCHI Foundation Quarterly December 2017 · Categories: BCHI /BCHA


Read MORE: FoundationQuarterlyDecember2017

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25. December 2017 · Comments Off on House Advances Bill That Would Allow Mountain Biking In Wilderness Areas · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

  DEC 19, 2017

There’s a new push in Congress to allow mountain bikers access to wilderness areas.

Last week, a house committee approved a measure that would amend the Wilderness Act. The bill would allow mountain bikes in wilderness areas, setting up another legislative battle about shared use on public lands.

The Wilderness Act of 1964 has allowed the protection of millions of acres across the United States. Idaho has several areas within its borders, earning it the title of “the wilderness state.”

But to Craig Gehrke with the Wilderness Society, letting mountain bikers recreate in these areas could erode the purpose of the 53-year-old law.

“These are places we set aside for their primitive nature,” says Gehrke. “And for people to go in and experience them not in a mechanical way but basically on foot or on horseback, kind of a preservation of the first experiences pioneers had in these places.”

Gehrke points out that the law explicitly bars “mechanical transport.”

But some Idaho groups are cheering the bill. The Idaho Statesman reports the president of the Southwest Idaho Mountain Bike Association says the measure would bring younger mountain bikers into the conservation movement.

It’s not clear when the bill may come up for a vote on the House floor, but Gehrke says the Wilderness Society will lobby Congressman Mike Simpson to vote against it.

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22. December 2017 · Comments Off on 2017 Squaw Butte Miles & Hours Summary · Categories: Around The Campfire, Work Parties and Projects

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19. December 2017 · Comments Off on FY 2017 Boise National Forest North Zone Trails Program Accomplishments · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

FY 2017 BNF NZ Trails Accomplishments 10.31.2017

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