11. May 2019 · Comments Off on It’s peak morel mushroom season in Idaho · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

BY NICOLE BLANCHARD
Morels are prized by professional chefs and amateur foodies alike for their nutty, earthy flavor. The truffle-like fungi can fetch prices upward of $20 per pound due to their scarcity and short growing season.

So there’s an obvious element to the vagueness with which morel hunters share their finds — no one wants to find their favorite spot picked clean or otherwise disturbed. But the morels themselves are, by nature, a little perplexing, and that adds to the secretive culture around finding them.

Morels are notoriously difficult to cultivate, and the vast majority of each yearly crop is collected in the wild. But where exactly those wild mushrooms will pop up is largely a guessing game.

“That’s sort of the fun (of morel hunting), it’s an enigma,” said Jonathan Oppenheimer, an avid morel hunter who works as the government relations director for the Idaho Conservation League.

“It’s different than huckleberries, where you have your spot and you know they’ll be there year after year after year,” Oppenheimer said.

Instead, morels tend to follow wildfires, cropping up in larger numbers in areas that burned the previous summer. But no one really knows why.

“The ‘big game’ in Idaho and the West is in burned areas,” Oppenheimer said.

Coloradans Trent and Kristen Blizzard comb through wildfire data to offer a “burn morel map” of the West each year through their website, Modern Forager. A PDF of burned areas across 10 states where you’re likely to find morels (including “the top 11 burns” in Idaho) will run you $40.

“Because they only grow in recent forest fires, they are not such a secret location and we are able to share new maps every year,” the Blizzards said in an email to the Statesman. “The real secret is to know what burn is the right one to go to — which we suss out in our book and maps for people. Finding the correct trees, elevations, aspects, etc. is the secret there … but, frankly, it is not rocket science!” READ MORE

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10. May 2019 · Comments Off on The John D. Dingell Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act · Categories: Public Lands


Last month, after both House and Senate approval, the president signed into law the John D. Dingell Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act. This sweeping act, cosponsored by senators Maria Cantwell (D-Washington) and Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), packaged together a raft of over 130 conservation bills addressing important issues such as the permanent reauthorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund, a national volcano-monitoring system, and protections against mineral extraction that could harm national parks.

The Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act, known in political circles as S.47, has been widely lauded for its expansive scope. A press release issued by Senator Cantwell called it “a key tool to continue to solve our problems of access to public lands, particularly in parts of the country where the access to those public lands is being eroded by development.”

It’s also a relief for stewards of the North Country Scenic Trail (NCT), the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, and the American Discovery Trail (ADT), three of our nation’s longest and most diverse trails, which will see significant development as a result of the act. READ MORE

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09. May 2019 · Comments Off on Sawyer Safety Workshop (Educational Event) · Categories: Education

Sawyer Safety Workshop – Sunday May 19, 2019 09:00 to 16:00 (Educational Event)
Location: Classroom:  Rob & Linda Adams, Sweet, ID
Sawyer safety review and  training class for new sawyers and current sawyers.  “A”&”B” Sawyers
If you are currently a sawyer or would like to be, plan on attending this class room safety review.
Pictures from Past Training Events  2015    2010
All who are planning to attend should review the  Sawyer Training Manual Chapter 1-3
Contact:  Rob Adams 208-781-0548  projects@sbbchidaho.org

Sign UP to attend event

May 2019 – “C” Bucker Sawyer Training     This week Charles Chick & Rob Adams completed “C” bucker training and received USFS accreditation to train and evaluate volunteer sawyers under the USFS program.

A Sawyer – Apprentice Sawyer Bucking Only. These sawyers must be supervised by a B or C skill level sawyer (supervising within their individual restrictions) during saw work activity in the least complex situations. Sawyers at this level may perform at the next higher level under the immediate supervision of a sawyer qualified at the higher level. Re-evaluation schedule: yearly.

B Sawyer – Intermediate Sawyer Bucking Only. These sawyers may work independently during saw work activity, and may cut any size material in moderately complex situations. Sawyers at this level may perform at the next higher level under the immediate supervision of a sawyer qualified at the higher level. Re-evaluation schedule: every 3 years.


Any member not listed above who in interested in learning about operating a chainsaw or working around someone who is should attend our Sawyer Safety workshop!
Ask anyone who attended last year, it is worth your time and is fun.

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04. May 2019 · Comments Off on Idaho Wild Life Federation – May News · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

READ FULL STORY
READ FULL STORY

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04. May 2019 · Comments Off on Supporting Idaho Diabetes Youth Programs (dba Camp Hodia) · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

LINK TO DONATION PAGE

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28. April 2019 · Comments Off on Spring Clinic – The Git-It-Done team & a local Boy’s Scout Troop · Categories: Education

The Git-It-Done team of Lisa Griffith, Janine Townsend, Janelle Weeks, Shelly Duff and Kelly Ragland present a six hour clinic at the Emmett public arena on a perfect spring day. Twenty six members and guest attended. Including members from a local Boys Scout troop who will be working with Squaw Butte on our National Trails Day project. The woman have been planing this clinic for months and put together a great program of both hands on and demonstrations and lectures of what stock packing is and how you can use your stock to explore the back country.Lisa Griffith started the clinic explaining the goals and how the day would progress, Janine Townsend talked about basic equipment and stock care, Shelly Duff discussed different packing saddles and there use and correct fit on your pack stock. Janelle Weeks did a spellbinding presentation on how to “back pack” on your riding horse. Just like magic, she pulled a complete outfit out of her saddle bags, that included tent, sleeping bag, pad, spare cloths, first aid and personal items, cooking equipment and food. Total weight 23 pounds.Kelly Ragland talked about first aid and kits for both humans and stock and that completed the morning session. Phil Ryan had grilled hot dogs, chips and drinks ready and the group enjoyed a great lunch. The team than brought the star of the show, Bubba the mule on stage and fitted a pack saddle on him, loaded boxes and an H-Pack and with the help of a couple of scouts pack him. We then broke up into groups and working with the “Blue” mules practiced a number of the items that had been discussed and answered a lot of great questions.

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28. April 2019 · Comments Off on Custom Living Quarters – for your horse trailer · Categories: Around The Campfire

Shelly Duff has a typical three horse goose-neck trailer with an RV mattress up front and a lot of stuff piled on the floor in the dressing room/storage space, like most of us with this style of trailer. In the summer of 2018 Lisa Griffith and her partner Levi Sayre converted her bumper pull trailers storage area into a cozy living quarters and Shelly was impressed. Over the winter Shelly cleaned out the area and Lisa and Levi went to work. This is the results.If you have always wanted a living quarters trailer, but didn’t want the size and cost that they generally entail, consider contacting Lisa and Levi to see what they might do with your current one.

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26. April 2019 · Comments Off on Mustangs of the East Fork & Challis Basin · Categories: Around The Campfire

 

 

 

A combination of planning, collaboration, hard work, and luck produced a wonderful Fine Art Photography exhibit called The Wild Horses of Idaho – Mustangs of the East Fork and Challis Basin which premiered at the MESH Gallery at Heritage Hall in Ketchum, Idaho on Saturday night (May 26th, 2018).
After eight months of planning and reconnaissance by MESH Art, Claire Porter and Jeff Lubeck conducted a multi-day photo-shoot in the Mountains of Idaho. In less than a one-weeks time the photographic artworks were created, printed, framed, and placed in the gallery for display. The exhibit includes a back-story narrative, maps, and behind the scenes photos. The exhibit will be on display through June 17th, 2018.
The Mustang is a free-roaming horse of the American West. It is a decedent of horses brought to America by the Spanish. Technically the Mustang is considered a feral horse given its domesticated linage.

See my Post Wild Horse Reconnaissance for more background on the Challis Herd and logistics of the photo-shoot.

Jeffrey H. Lübeck
MESH Art LLC.
420 4th Street East
Ketchum, Idaho 83333
(208) 720-9114
jeffreylubeck@mac.com

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11. April 2019 · Comments Off on Trail Etiquette · Categories: Around The Campfire, Education

As the snow continues to melt across Central Oregon, outdoors enthusiasts of all types are getting increasingly eager to venture out onto dirt trails.

Hikers, runners, mountain bikers and horseback riders are all ready to enjoy spring on the area’s seemingly endless network of paths.

But before they do so, perhaps a refresher on trail etiquette is in order. Yes, the Bend area is growing and the trails are getting more use. But knowing how to react when you encounter another trail user — and knowing the rules regarding dog-leash restrictions and muddy trails — can greatly add to everybody’s enjoyment of our renowned trail system.

Right of way

The yellow upside-down triangle sign that is affixed to trees on certain trails where there might be conflict among users offers perhaps the simplest explanation for who yields to whom: Mountain bikers yield to both pedestrians and equestrians; all user groups yield to equestrians.

This is mostly for safety reasons, as some horses can spook easily and knock their riders off if a mountain biker or runner comes whizzing by without yielding or warning.

“It’s always good to communicate with a person on horseback and get some feedback,” says Jana Johnson, dispersed recreation team leader for the Deschutes National Forest. “And to be ready to dismount if you can or to get off the trail. Yeah, some horses get spooked if someone comes around a corner quickly. But they all react in different ways depending on the horse. There’s some hazards associated with that.”

At areas such at Horse Butte, just east of Bend, encounters between mountain bikers and horseback riders are fairly common. Other high-use areas, such as the Phil’s Trail network west of Bend, do not have as much equestrian use.

At some popular areas, such as Peterson Ridge near Sisters and Maston near Tumalo, separate trails have been built for mountain bikers and horseback riders.

“Most of our trails are multiple use, so it’s always a good idea to follow the yield sign, but also a friendly gesture to say hello to other user groups,” Johnson says. “I find that can just send a message, that hey, we’re all out here enjoying the same thing and we can all enjoy it together by being respectful to each other. The trails are starting to dry out now and become snow-free. People are definitely starting to get out now.”

Woody Keen, trails program director for the Central Oregon Trail Alliance (COTA) and a retired professional trail contractor, says mountain bikers ride different trails accordingly. If they are riding a one-way trail in the Phil’s system they are unlikely to encounter a horseback rider, hiker, or other mountain biker. But if they are riding, for instance, the Metolius-Windigo Trail or the Deschutes River Trail, they know they are likely to come across hikers or horseback riders.

“When I’m out riding the Deschutes River Trail, which is predominantly a hiking trail, my reactions need to be different than in the same situation on Phil’s Trail,” Keen says.

He adds that trail users should also be cognizant of the predominant user group and which user group was responsible for designing and building the trail they are on.

“Understand who’s actually taking care of the trails,” Keen says. “I think that goes a long way, giving that respect. Understand how these trails came to be. I think that would go a long way toward helping to reduce potential conflict. We need to figure out how to get along and reduce conflict through better education and more signage, and better camaraderie on working on that common trail.”

As mountain biking continues to grow in popularity in Central Oregon, encounters among bikers are increasingly common. The main rule is that the rider traveling uphill has the right of way.

That can be confusing for several reasons. For starters, many of our trails in Central Oregon are relatively flat. Also, does that mean uphill in general, as in riding west of Bend toward the Cascade Range? No, says Keen. It means any uphill section.

“If you’re going west, you’re generally going uphill, but there are places where you’re going downhill,” Keen says. “Coming back toward town (Bend), you generally are descending. The key is just looking ahead and expecting other users and respecting other users. It’s situation specific.”

Dogs

Keen says that one of the most prevalent types of user conflicts recently has been off-leash dogs versus on-leash dogs.

The vast majority of the Deschutes National Forest allows off-leash dogs. According to the U.S. Forest Service, from Nov. 1 to May 1, dogs are allowed on all but 1 % of the Deschutes National Forest. The area where dogs are not allowed is located north of the Cascade Lakes Highway (west of Bend) and includes areas accessed by the Virginia Meissner, Swampy Lakes, Vista Butte and Dutchman sno-parks.

During the summer, about 54 miles of the 1,200 miles of trails on the forest have an on-leash requirement, according to the Forest Service. These trails include the Three Sisters Wilderness Area between the South Sisters Climbers Trail and Todd Lake from July 15 to Sept. 15. Also, dogs must be leashed on a portion of the Deschutes River Trail (between Benham Falls and Meadow Camp) from May 15 to Sept. 15, except when entering or exiting water sources to swim and play.

Muddy trails

Many trails remain covered in snow and ice, and some are muddy from a combination of snowmelt and rainfall. Trail users are advised by both the Forest Service and COTA to stay off muddy trails, because using them can leave ruts from footprints, tire marks, or horse hooves that dry and harden later in the spring.

“Wait until they drain and firm up a little more, and dry out,” Johnson says. “Those ruts can last for a long time.”

Mountain bikers can check bendtrails.org for information on conditions of area trails.

“It was a pretty long winter — it still is,” Keen says. “I get that people want to go recreate on dirt trails. I understand that. But we ask people to use good judgment and if you observe that you are leaving tread damage because the trail is too soft, turn around and go somewhere else.”

—Reporter: 541-383-0318,

mmorical@bendbulletin.com

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11. April 2019 · Comments Off on South Korea to Open 3 Hiking Trails to DMZ · Categories: Around The Campfire

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11. April 2019 · Comments Off on Recreational Trails Program – 2019 · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

2019-RTP-Report

Grant Program Guidance 2019

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07. April 2019 · Comments Off on CPR & Outdoor First Aid Review – Bogus Basin Ski Patrol · Categories: Around The Campfire, Education

http://www.bbsp.org/              https://www.facebook.com/bogusbasinskipatrol/

Service and Safety
Written by Carol Peterson

Service and Safety……………….Since the inception of the National Ski Patrol by Charles Minot “Minnie” Dole in 1938, “Service and Safety” has been the NSP motto. Keeping people safe on the mountain and during other outdoor activities is the mission of every patroller wearing the red jacket with the white cross on back.

Could you be a patroller? Would you like to become a member of an organizations whose core values are Excellence, Service, Camaraderie, Leadership, Integrity and Responsiveness? Life happens and the patrol is continually looking for snow sport enthusiasts willing to give their time and skills to help recreationalists be safer during their outdoor pursuits.

The Bogus Basin Ski Patrol is a mostly volunteer organization that primarily provides support for the Bogus Basin Mountain Resort non profit organization that is entrusted with the stewardship of the ski area by the U.S. Forest Service. The support we provide is emergency first aid services. We respond, assess, treat, package, and transport to higher medical authority. Now that we have the technical accurate description out of the way, we can talk about what is ‘under the hood’. Basically, we are a large family. After the shared adversity of enduring the 15 months that it takes to become a patroller, you really get to know your fellow candidates, the patrollers that train you, and the whole patrol family.


Do I need prior medical or emergency medical care experience?

No. The patrol training program begins with the Outdoor Emergency Care (OEC) training course. This is a comprehensive class and practical training program that has been developed and refined over the years by the National Ski Patrol. It is intense and requires good personal study habits. You must, ultimately, successfully demonstrate that you have learned the knowledge and are able to perform the treatment skills that this course covers in a series of written and practical tests. So while prior experience is a benefit the curriculum requires only that you make a strong commitment to learn – and succeed in doing so.

On April 6, 2019 eleven Squaw Butte members joined five Bogus Basin Ski Patrol members lead by Karen King to take a one day version of their “OEC” Outdoor Emergency Care training course. This very hands on course is tailored by Karen and her team to target the types of medical emergencies that Back Country Horsemen might encounter on the trail, and what steps to take and what not to do, until the injured party is delivered to higher medical assistance.
The BBSP team would demonstrate and then we would break up into small groups and practice the procedure, during which questions were ask, suggestions made and techniques learned. 2019 Outdoor First Aid Class SummaryCoffee and snacks were available to fuel attendees and during the short lunch break we grabbed by the slice pizza from a shop near by. During the whole day, Bogus Basin staff selling season passes and taking in rental ski packages could hear the laughter through the walls of the training room. If you have not attended one of these classes, it is highly recommended you do in the future, you will greatly increase your knowledge and have a great time doing it.

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05. April 2019 · Comments Off on BCHI Convention Photo Contest · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

David Benson & Mike Heilman loading a bag at Farley Lake – ITA Pack-Out  July 2018

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03. April 2019 · Comments Off on Public Lands Bill S1089 – Killed in 2019 Session · Categories: Public Lands, Public Meetings

We made it pretty far with the only piece of pro-access legislation of the 2019 session. In fact, it’s the only pro-sportsman related bill introduced this year, period. We provided the committee with high profile news reports of illegal access obstruction going unpunished, and the cultural and economic reasons to support public property rights. Ultimately non-issue concerns, obfuscating the true purpose of S1089, and the Wilks brothers’ testimony won the day.

IWF has made good headway for this idea of civil enforcement of access obstruction, and will carry that momentum today through the 2020 legislative session. But meanwhile, let’s dig into what we learned at the hearing:

The Wilks Bro’s personal lobbyist testified and worked to kill the bill. The lobbyist also happened to be the lawyer who wrote the Trespass Bill of last year. No surprise there, but upsetting that 6 of the 9 legislators sided with out-of-state billionaires over Idahoans, again. The lobbyist opined that S1089 would criminalize innocent behavior, but there are two things to point out about that claim. 1) The bill clearly addresses only “willful” acts, not accidental. 2) The Attorney General opinion for S1089 refutes that claim.

READ MORE

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29. March 2019 · Comments Off on FB – Trail Workers of America · Categories: Around The Campfire

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25. March 2019 · Comments Off on Saddle Tune UP – DeMac Mules · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

Bob McFadden has a spring special going for BCHI members.  A complete cleaning, repair and conditioning of your saddle.  My 17 year old McCall Packer was in serious need of some TLC.  Bob did a great job and I am ready for the next 10 year on the trail.

EPSON MFP image

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24. March 2019 · Comments Off on Weed Free Forage · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

Backcountry Feed Handout

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24. March 2019 · Comments Off on Providing Quality Horse Forage – BCHI Convention March 2019 · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

John Hogge, U-of-I Extension Area Educator – Presenter at the Convention

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2332&context=extension_curall

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18. March 2019 · Comments Off on 26 years managing wild horses in Gem County · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

About 15 miles north of Emmett is 25,806 acres of rolling hills, prominent buttes and ridgelines that make up the Bureau of Land Management’s Four-Mile Wild Horse Management Area (HMA). Elevations vary from 2,500 to about 5,400 feet.

The Four-Mile population census taken in February 2018 was 128 horses according to Boise District BLM Wild Horse and Burro Specialist Raul Trevino.

History of Gem’s wild horses

The Four-Mile horses originated from domestic stock owned by those living in the Big Willow Creek and Four-Mile Creek areas. Pinto horses were raised by Jack Macomb in the 1930s in the Four Mile Canyon. Others raised horses in the area including Nelson McCullough on Willow Creek, Tom Wilburn on South Crane Creek and Walter Knox on the Indian Jake Ranch. These horses were not considered wild according to the BLM until people came and tried to catch them or chase them. Being difficult to corral, they were considered wild. Sixty-five privately owned horses were rounded up and removed in 1965.

At the passage of the Free Roaming Horse and Burro Act in 1971, two HMAs were identified and BLM was given authority to manage wild horses and burros on public lands. There were 75 horses in the 4-Mile HMA and West Crane HMA. Decisions removed the horses permanently from West Crane and reduced the Four-Mile to the appropriate management level of 20 head for rangeland health.

An aerial survey in 1972 counted a total of 13 adult and two foals. Of those, one was a mule, one wore a halter and another horse wore hobbles.

During a 1986 wildfire in the Four-Mile HMA, 14,000 acres burned. The horses were removed January 1987 due to a lack of forage on their home range and to allow vegetation recovery. The area was aerially seeded with grasses and forbs. Then in the fall of 1991, nine horses from the Owyhee Resource Area were introduced back into the Four-Mile HMA. Three years later there were 12 head on 18,018 acres.

Currently there are 128 horses in the HMA. The Low Allowable Management level is 37 head for the area, so the BLM is in the process of gathering and removing horses to meet the allowable number. BLM manages a total of six wild horse herd management areas in Idaho on approximately 418,000 acres of private, public and state lands.

As of March 1, 2018, the wild horse and burro population on public lands was estimated at 82,000 animals, which is more than triple the number of animals the land can support in conjunction with other legally mandated land uses. Four-Mile HMA is also overpopulated.

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18. March 2019 · Comments Off on Wilson Creek Trail Head – Hard Trigger Loop · Categories: Fun Rides, Public Lands

March 17, 2019 turned out to be a great day to ride in the Owyhee Front, high 40’s temperatures, light breezes and a group of members and guest that were really glad to be out on their horses.  BLM’s Wilson Creek Trail head is the perfect location for a day like this. Lots of great trail, good parking and pretty easy to get to.
Our group broke up in to three separate teams. One team went hiking, the second team wanted to make the 10 miles Hard Trigger Canyon Loop, and the third team wanted to ride up the Wilson Creek trail making a shorter loop.

After everyone returned from their respective rides and hikes we shared various treats and talked about the adventures we had!

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06. March 2019 · Comments Off on BCHI State Convention, March 23, 2019 · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

Dear BCHI Members,

I have been asked by the Eagle Rock chapter to encourage you to attend the Saturday, March 23rd Convention.

I have been attending conventions since 2007, and I can tell you they are FUN, EDUCATIONAL and the food is always GREAT. But watch those auctions, with all the great donations you could home with less $green$ (all I can say is thank God for plastic!). And speaking of donations, chapters are asked to bring a high ticket item for the live auction and individuals, if they like, can bring new or used items (like the silver bit I got lats year) for the silent auction. And don’t forget the Photo Contest!!! The 2018 calendar full page photos for August and September were past winners.

Here is the agenda for the day. The morning is filled with business which includes four proposals to vote on. Each chapter gets 8 voting delegates (members in good standing-meaning they’ve paid their dues). The more delegates your chapter has, the more sway you’ll have in the voting. Sometimes it comes down to just that one vote.

Also attached is the registration form. The due date says the 4th, but call Winnie or Aline and they will be more than happy to take your RSVP.

The convention will be held at Shilo Inn and Convention Center
780 Lindsay Blvd. Idaho Falls, Id. 83402, (208) 523-0088 shiloinns.com
Special Discounted Room Rate: $83 nightly (reserve under BCHI name) some times you can’t get the special discount if you use an 800 number.
https://www.shiloinns.com/shilo-inns-idaho-falls?pi=iifid

2019 Registration Form                     3-23-19 Convention Agenda

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05. March 2019 · Comments Off on 2018 Trail Log Total – 566.15 miles – The Sage Writer Blog · Categories: Around The Campfire

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04. March 2019 · Comments Off on 2019 Idaho Sportsman Show · Categories: Around The Campfire, BCHI /BCHA, Current Events, Education



For the 10th year the south western Idaho chapters of Back Country Horsemen of Idaho, Boise, Squaw Butte and Treasure Valley have manned a BCHI information booth at the Idaho Sportsman show at the Expo Idaho grounds. As in years past our booth was next to Public Land Agencies, the US Forest Service and BLM. Our display generated a lot of interest, with lots of questions about the various pictures and the trail safety posters. We handed out lots of information about BCHI, and the ITA (Idaho Trails Association) who partners with our chapters on wilderness projects. Thank you to the members of the Boise and Treasure Valley chapters who stood booth shifts, and to the Squaw Butte Members, David Benson, Charles & Lorraine Chick, Shannon Schantz, Nancy Smith, Arlynn Hacker, Phil Ryan, Carmen Tyack, Bill Holt, Rob Adams and Bill & Marybeth Conger.

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02. March 2019 · Comments Off on BCHA – Congress passed Public Lands Bill · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Public Lands

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01. March 2019 · Comments Off on Idaho Public Land Bills – 2019 · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

ttacks to Idaho’s public lands in the Idaho legislature have been on the rise. This year, IWF has worked hard to shed light on legislation moving through the State House that negatively impact Idaho’s public lands and your public land rights. HJM5, HJM8 and HB162 all have negative consequences for Idaho’s lands and wildlife and all four passed through the House, now bound for the Senate. You can find out more about each bill on our website.

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01. March 2019 · Comments Off on 2019 – Packing Clinic – Squaw Butte · Categories: Around The Campfire, BCHI /BCHA, Current Events, Education


2019 PACK CLINIC

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01. March 2019 · Comments Off on Lorraine Joyce Genzmer – BCHI Cache Peak · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Member Profiles

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28. February 2019 · Comments Off on March 2019 Education Reports · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

BCHI March 2019 Education Report

 

BCHI March 2019 ND Report

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28. February 2019 · Comments Off on Protecting Big Prairie · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands


Bob Article July 2018

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22. February 2019 · Comments Off on IHC Report February 2019 · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Meetings

IDAHO HORSE COUNCIL report Respectfully submitted by Marybeth Conger- IHC Director for BCHI – one of seven

After IHC President Dixie Christensen called meeting to order, roll call was taken and motions carried to approve the November 17,2018 minutes as amended and the special director meeting of December 27, 2018.

The following guests and IHC membership representatives were introduced and welcomed: Randi McCallan- AQHA, Ann Martin- 2019 IHC Organizational member SCGH, Rhonda Gundert (Kimberly Kvamme’s friend), DeEtte Lindberg- IHB Executive Director, Dan Tackett, and Sabina Amidon- 2019 IHC Individual Member.

1. Treasurer’s Report & Financial Summary presented.

Unfinished Business:

2. Hiring of Executive Director- A committee was formed. Director input on what an Executive Director should do for the IHC. Please respond to committee email requests. IHC has temporarily hired a temporary secretary.

3. Please welcome and congratulate Cheryl Keshian as the IHC 2019 2nd Vice President.

4. Janine Townsend discussed Horse Statue. Cost could be $2,500- $3,500. Sabrina Amidon has one for the IHC to borrow temporarily. Janine will handle getting this horse to the 2019 Expo.

5. DeEtte Lindberg, Idaho Horse Board Executive Director, gave update. Senator Patti Anne Lodge working to present draft bill to increase equine fees.

Read complete report

IHC January 26 2019 report for BCHI 2019-02-07 Meeting Minutes

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09. February 2019 · Comments Off on Horse Trailer Maintenance – Video · Categories: Around The Campfire, Education


Link to Video

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07. February 2019 · Comments Off on Chapter and State officer training webinar- Feb 23, 2019 · Categories: Education


LINK TO SIGN UP FOR WEBINAR

Marybeth Conger
BCHI Education chair
208-236-0769
education-chair@bchi.org

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07. February 2019 · Comments Off on ITA – 2018 Annual Report · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

READ FULL REPORT

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02. February 2019 · Comments Off on Idaho Wildlife Federation – Bill Tracker · Categories: Current Events

Link to Website

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Read Laurie Bryan’s Blog

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17. January 2019 · Comments Off on Stock Packing & Wilderness Skills Days – Klamath Falls, OR · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

EPSON MFP image

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17. January 2019 · Comments Off on When Government is closed! · Categories: Around The Campfire

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17. January 2019 · Comments Off on Shoshone National Forest – Great Horse Country · Categories: Around The Campfire, BCHI /BCHA, Public Lands

 

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15. January 2019 · Comments Off on BCHA – Education Resources · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

Visit the page to see these and many more!

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13. January 2019 · Comments Off on Boise National Forest Closures (Road & Trails) · Categories: Public Lands

Web-Page

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09. January 2019 · Comments Off on Payette National Forest Trail Status Map · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

PAYETTE TRAILS! Introducing the Payette National Forest Trail Status Map! This is a great map that allows you to see the current status of every trail on the Forest. Plan your next trip with this map. Click this link – its easy to remember! http:/bit.ly/PayetteTrails

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04. January 2019 · Comments Off on Equine Trail Sports · Categories: Around The Campfire

Posted by Arlynn Hacker
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02. January 2019 · Comments Off on BCHI Sawyer Certification Program – Update · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

Subject: Fwd: Sawyer Certification Program

Dear Directors and Presidents,
Attached to this email you will find a file containing a completed application to establish a Sawyer Certification Program for Back Country Horsemen of Idaho according to the Forest Service Saw Policy, Forest Service Manual 2358.

Rob Adams of the Squaw Butte Chapter presented this application process at the September Board Meeting based on application information he had received from Oregon and California BCH.

Since the Board meeting, I have spoken with Pete Duncan who is the National Saw Program Manager. Mr. Duncan stated that BCH of California, Oregon and Washington all have approved programs under this policy. He would like to see Back Country Horsemen of Idaho have a Certification Program in place as well. Mr. Duncan said Back Country Horsemen of Idaho must have an approved Sawyer Certification Program in place in order to train and certify ourselves under the USFS Saw Policy.

The short version of the Sawyer Certification Program is as follows:
1. The Forest Service (USFS) will certify “C” Sawyer/evaluators.
2. Then BCHI “C” Sawyer/BCHI-Sawyer Package 12-31-2018 will train and certify other BCHI members as either
A or B Sawyers depending on experience and abilities.
3. Eventually, BCHI “C” Sawyer/evaluators will be able to certify new “C” sawyer/evaluators.
4. BCHI Education Chair or his/her designee will enter training records directly into the USFS
data base.

The only change for current “C” sawyer/evaluators that have been conducting classes is their completed evaluation forms would now be submitted to the BCHI Saw Program Coordinator rather than their local FS Districts.

Once approved, this Sawyer Certification Program will cover the entire state of Idaho. Also, since the training records are entered in the national USFS data base, our sawyers can volunteer in any state or USFS Region.
I will be seeking Board approval at the March Board meeting. Please review this with your Chapter members as soon as possible, and contact me with any questions and/or concerns.

Thank you,
Bill Conger, Chairman

BCHI Sawyer Certification submitted documentation

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21. December 2018 · Comments Off on Back Country Horsemen of Washington – Videos · Categories: Around The Campfire, BCHI /BCHA


Their are a number of excellent videos that are worth your time watching. LINK

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20. December 2018 · Comments Off on SBFC – The Wildest Place – Fall 2018 · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

Read Fall 2018 Newsletter

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18. December 2018 · Comments Off on A People’s History of Wilderness · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

A People’s History of Wilderness Paperback – September 2004
by Matt Jenkins (Editor)

Published on the 40th anniversary of America’s most important public lands protection movement

·Highlights the citizen activists who made and continue to make wilderness real
·Features new and archival stories from High Country News

With the signing of the Wilderness Act by President Lyndon B. Johnson on September 3, 1964, the National Wilderness Preservation System was established to secure for the American people of present and future generations the benefits of an enduring resource of wilderness. High Country News brings to life the people and events who shaped this unprecedented citizen’s movement. Drawn from the pages of this award-winning newspaper whose coverage has been solely focused on environmental and cultural issues affecting the American West for over three decades, A People’s History of Wilderness presents the competing philosophies, complexities, and passions, as they happened, that has resulted in the protection of over 104 million acres of wilderness.

This is an excellent compilation of articles, essays and editorials from the top magazine about the western United States, High Country News, specifically dealing with wilderness.

Major national environmental groups as well as local organizations all get their due, as well as insight onto their different angles in wilderness legislation attempts, lobbying, etc.

So, too, do questions about compromise vs. hardball tactics, local vs. national perspectives, state-by-state vs. interstate wilderness bills and more.

But, this is also about the enjoyment of wilderness on the ground, along with related issues such as its overenjoyment in some cases, compromises with rancher grazing rights, and even more so with old mining claims and such.

You can’t do better than this book as an intro to wilderness issues.

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18. December 2018 · Comments Off on Fire Season · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

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16. December 2018 · Comments Off on Idaho Wildlife Federation – December News · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Deeds Reveal Billionaire Brothers Illegally Gated Public Road

Contact: Brian Brooks, Idaho Wildlife Federation, (208) 870-7967

BOISE – The Idaho Wildlife Federation has found deeds from past landowners granting easements for sections of Forest Road 374, the Boise Ridge Road, for public use in perpetuity. The easements apply to the sections of road the Wilks’ brothers company, DF Development, has recently installed gates on, making the installations a violation of Idaho law.

Earlier this fall the Texas billionaire Wilks brothers made waves by installing gates on the very popular Boise Ridge Road located just north of Boise, which is frequently used by Idahoans for hunting and recreation access on the Boise National Forest. But Brian Brooks, executive director of the Idaho Wildlife Federation says, “this is about more than just gates. This is about wealthy individuals flaunting Idaho’s laws and illegally claiming public resources as their own without repercussions. And it spurs the question- how many more public roads have they illegally claimed as their own?”
IWF’s investigation into the construction of the Boise Ridge Road revealed the road was built with public dollars, and has been maintained using taxpayer dollars. The road was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s using public funds for the purpose of public use and fire management. Through a Freedom of Information Act request submitted by The Wilderness Society and shared with the Idaho Wildlife Federation, it was found that taxpayers have been footing the bill for maintaining the road for nearly 90 years, fulfilling prescriptive road easement requirements.

“DF Development has never had the right to close or install gates on the Boise Ridge Road, because it belongs to the public. These out-of-state folks have a lot of nerve coming into Idaho and gating a road that was built and paid for by the public,” says Brooks.

Current Idaho law prohibits marking public lands and roads as private. However, as a criminal violation only, a government entity must initiate the lawsuit for its enforcement. “The law lacks a civil remedy common in property disputes, which would give Idaho citizens the power to resolve the issue peer to peer in court,” according to Brooks.

“Counties are strapped for resources, especially rural counties where these violations are happening. Choosing to derail county budgets to prosecute billionaires over access issues, while burdened with more heinous crimes, is not financially practical. It’s time we give citizens legal recourse to enforce public access. By adding a civil remedy to the existing law we can save taxpayer dollars and mobilize enforcement procedures faster.”

Adding a civil suit clause will require action by the state legislature and could be passed as an amendment to the recently updated trespass law, the same law the Wilks brothers lobbied for. During the 2018 legislative session, IWF attempted to include a civil remedy provision to the legislation, but the idea was rebuffed and Idaho’s citizens were kept from enforcing their right to access public property. IWF is vetting potential legislation to lawmakers and interest groups for the 2019 session.

“It’s a small change. A civil remedy exists to protect private property rights. Now it’s time to protect public property rights.”

MORE NEWS from IWF

Matthew interviewed by Becca Aceto

Worn leather boots lined the wall and a dusty wood stove sat in the corner of the room, ready for the inevitable chill to return to the mountains. “What we really need right now is a whiskey.” I smiled at this remark.

Matthew’s small cabin was dimly lit and a faint smell of game meat lingered in the air, the only trace of meals past. Out the front door and across the airstrip mules and horses snoozed in the midday sun. A few miles to our north and less to the east was the massive Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

We talked for over an hour, laughing about ornery mules in the backcountry and reminiscing of trips past. Some of the wildest places in the lower 48 have shaped Matthew, both professionally and personally. I’d also like to point out that Matthew never mentioned a specific animal he’d harvested or shot he’d taken. His words were of experience and place – he puts great value on the intrinsic worth of things. I was glad to sit down and have this conversation. Enjoy!

B: Tell me a bit about your background. Did you grow up outdoors and hunting?

M: I sure did. My father is a lifetime hunter who had me out in the woods of Missouri with him from a young age. We’d hunt deer, turkeys and squirrels on both private and public land. I also ran my own traplines beginning in middle school, water trapping for beavers, muskrat, mink and otters predominantly. Paddling a canoe down the river checking traps really builds up an appreciation of the natural world in someone. I don’t trap anymore. Now my dad comes out to Montana every fall and we take the mules into the Scapegoat and Bob Marshall wilderness to hunt elk and deer.

B: So how’d you get into packing?

M: I got into packing when I was 18 as a trail crew member in the Bob Marshall Wilderness and learned from a fellow who’s the lead packer there to this day. Our trail crew would take stock out to self-support us during 10-day hitches. I went to Glacier National Park a couple years later as a backcountry ranger. I used stock and learned a lot more about packing from a guy who was the lead packer there for over 30 years.

I really learned a lot when I started working with an outfitter out of Augusta, Montana packing and guiding elk and deer hunts in the Bob Marshall and Scapegoat. We had one camp that was a 24-mile ride one way over the highest pass in the Bob. That’s some wild country back there. I like having grizzlies on the landscape. You get an elk down, snow is falling and you see fresh griz tracks bigger than your head, all the while thinking “I wonder if it’s on the elk.” It’s great.

B: Do you see yourself fitting into the realm of conservation through this work?

M: Absolutely. I support public access for fishermen, hunters, hikers, backpackers – really anyone using the country I work in. I also support trail crews and rangers to get trails opened up and to make sure regulations are followed in the backcountry. I pack out a lot of trash, too. Last year during the solar eclipse I spent a week in the White Clouds. We had a lot of people in the mountains so I made sure everyone was following fire restrictions and wilderness regulations over the span of that week. Fortunately people were pretty knowledgeable so I didn’t have much work to do. In 2016 I packed the chief of the Forest Service as well as Mike Simpson and a few others into the newly-designated White Clouds Wilderness which was a really good time. That trip left a big impression on everyone.

B: Have you had any wildlife encounters while packing that could have been a bit hairy?

M: Oh, once I was leading a pack string through Glacier National Park and we came across a grizzly chowing down on glacier lilies. I started yelling at it, “Hey, bear! Hey, bear!” It didn’t even look up so I just rode right on by. The stock did great, didn’t make a fuss at all.

B: And the bear?

M: That damn bear never even looked up. Just kept on eating as we passed by at about 20 yards.

B: Do you have any conservation idols who come to mind?

M: It’s hard for me to just pick one, but I really like the Montana writer and conservationist Joseph Kinsey Howard. I also like Wallace Stegner and Jack Turner. And Fred Bear is probably my favorite hunter/conservationist.

B: Any hunting stories that have stuck with you over the years?

M: Oh, well there was this one time… A few years back I was hunting deer at the edge of a meadow near a clear cut. Suddenly this mountain lion walks out into the meadow not 40 yards from me, lays down and takes a nap. It was there for three hours and the whole time I just sat there watching. Every now and then it would lift its head up, look around and yawn, then lay back down. Finally, it got up and stretched with lazy kitten eyes that I was watching through my binoculars. I turned around for just a second to look for deer on the hill behind me and when I turned back around the cat was gone. Just like that. It was amazing.

B: Any final thoughts?

M: The best thing I can say is that I am poor in the sense that I own no house and no property but living between Idaho and Montana I am so land rich as a citizen of the United States. I can head out my door and do an array of activities on millions and millions of acres. It’s unparalleled. Let’s hope lots of folks step up to keep it that way.

Matthew Chappell is a wilderness packer for the Payette National Forest. He spends half his year packing in Idaho’s wilderness areas and the other half at his home on the edge of the Bob Marshall Wilderness in Montana.

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11. December 2018 · Comments Off on 2019 Wilderness Ranger Internship · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

2019 Wilderness Ranger Internship

The goals of the SBFC Wilderness Ranger Intern (WRI) program are to train, educate, mentor and provide employment development opportunities for the next generations of wilderness professionals and provide skilled support to the Forest Service for accomplishing priority wilderness work.

This is a 14-week internship for military veterans and college students doing under-graduate or graduate work in conservation, resource management, wilderness, recreation or related fields.  The internship offers wilderness skills training including the basics of trail maintenance, Wilderness First Responder, and Wilderness Act history and policy, followed by 12 weeks working in the Selway-Bitterroot and Frank Church Wilderness areas, with trained wilderness professionals, US Forest Service managers and volunteers.   LEARN MORE

** The 2019 WRI application will be open until January 4, 2019. **    APPLY

Selway Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation

Committed to wilderness and to the people who love it as much as we do.

The Selway Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation is a community of wilderness minded and hardworking individuals, dedicated to connecting wilderness with the people who work, live, and play within it.

The efforts of the SBFC community protect and preserve the natural, pristine character of wilderness.

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08. December 2018 · Comments Off on BCHA webinar- Chapter member training Feb 23 8:00 AM to 12 noon- come join us! · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education
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