C. Devon Mills, 55, Emmett, (formerly of Eagle) Idaho, passed away Tuesday, September 25, 2018. Devon was born December 26, 1962 in Denver, Colorado, raised in Twin Falls, Idaho and graduated from Filer High School, Class of 1981. He married his high school sweetheart Allison Whitney in 1984, had two children Brianne and Brandon and later divorced. Devon spent the past 16 years with his loving companion Linda Erickson.

Linda Address:  Linda Erickson: 6727 W. South Slope Rd, Emmett 83617Devon was a proud member of Boy Scouts, 4-H, FFA, local pool leagues, the Twin Falls and Caldwell Elks Lodges and Back Country Horseman. He was employed by Amalgamated Sugar for 36 plus years.Survived by: Linda Erickson, Ruth “Mom” Mills, brothers: Randy, Claude “Butch” (Teri), Keith (Amy); sister: Cheryl (Scott) Taylor, Wallace “Creep” Farnham; birth mom: Toni Farnham; children: Brianne (Armando) Guzman, Brandon (Ashley) Mills, Carlee (Michael) Olivera, Ryan Erickson; and mother of his children Allison Chapman; Grandchildren; Anthony, Enzo, Harper, Jadyn, Drake, Brooklyn, and Ryder; and numerous aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, and in-laws.Preceded in death by: his Dad Justin Clark Mills, Grandparents Clark and Eleanor Mills, Charles and Thelma Tippett, Elsie Kenyon, Vern Osborn and Step Dad Wallace Farnham Sr.Devon loved spending time with his family camping, hunting, fishing and riding. His children and grand children brought so much love and joy to him and were the highlight of his life. Some of his best days were the miles he spent on his mules riding in the mountains.Services provided by Cloverdale Funeral Home; Boise, Idaho. A celebration of life will be held 3:00 PM on Saturday, September 29, 2018 at Caldwell Elks Lodge.  Caldwell Elks Lodge #1448, 1015 N Kimball Ave, Caldwell, ID 83605  MAP

Make Me No Grave

Make me no grave within that quiet place
Where friends shall sadly view the grassy mound,
Politely solemn for a little space,
As though the spirit slept beneath the ground.

For me no sorrow, nor the hopeless tear;
No chant, no prayer, no tender eulogy:
I may be laughing with the gods–while here
You weep alone. Then make no grave for me

But lay me where the pines, austere and tall,
Sing in the wind that sweeps across the West:
Where night, imperious, sets her coronal
Of silver stars upon the mountain crest.

Where dawn, rejoicing, rises from the deep,
And Life, rejoicing, rises with the dawn:
Mark not the spot upon the sunny steep,
For with the morning light I shall be gone.

Far trails await me; valleys vast and still,
Vistas undreamed of, canyon-guarded streams,
Lowland and range, fair meadow, flower-girt hill,
Forests enchanted, filled with magic dreams.

And I shall find brave comrades on the way:
None shall be lonely in adventuring,
For each a chosen task to round the day,
New glories to amaze, new songs to sing.

Loud swells the wind along the mountain-side,
High burns the sun, unfettered swings the sea,
Clear gleam the trails whereon the vanished ride,
Life calls to life: then make no grave for me!

Henry Herbert Knibbs, from Songs of the Trail, 1920
This poem is in the public domain and does not require permission for use

September 2018 National Director Report
respectfully submitted by Marybeth Conger, BCHI National Director

It was indeed an honor to represent the State of Idaho at the National Board meeting on April 23-25 in Spokane, Washington. Next year the meeting is in North Carolina. Hope you find this report informative. I am always available to answer questions or hear your concerns. 208-369-0769 or mbconger1@gmail.com
Some meeting highlights include:
1. memorial for lost members
2. acceptance of all agendas, letters, and minutes
3. Wisconsin was voted in as our newest state
4. eleven committees reported
5. a balanced budget was presented and approved
6. resolution to add a youth membership category narrowly passed. Keep in mind, each state can decide to add one or not because BCH is a downward up organization. The state of Idaho voted against this resolution citing liability concerns and question of overreaching
7. BCHA foundation had grant monies to help fund chapter and/or state activities. For more details visit www.bcha.org/blog/2017/12/06/bcha-education-foundation-grants

READ MORE:September 2018 National Director Report

September  22, 2018 Education Report- respectfully submitted by Marybeth Conger BCHI Education Chair

Last year in Idaho, a bill was proposed to change Title 25, Animals, Chapter 11, State Brand Board and eliminate equine annual and lifetime brand inspections since fees collected did not cover expenses. Fortunately, this bill was tabled to give an opportunity for industry input. On September 10, I and many others, attended a collaborative industry meeting at the Idaho State Police Headquarters located in Meridian, Idaho. The purpose of this meeting was for discussions regarding different ideas/proposals to make the equine brand inspection program more financially sustainable. Attendees included Cody Burlile State Brand Inspector, Idaho Cattle Association, The Beef Board, Idaho Dairy Bureau, Idaho Farm Bureau, Back Country Horsemen of America, Back Country Horsemen of Idaho, American Quarter horse association, Dressage, Idaho Horse Council and the Idaho Horse Board. It was agreed that the Idaho Horse Council (IHC) would take the lead and write a proposal to reflect a higher fee for equine inspections and submit the IHC board ratified proposal to the other meeting attendees. IHC will work with Cody Burlile to collect information and program insight when drafting the proposal. IHC would need to hire a lobbyist too. As equine owners, we know these inspections legitimize ownership. But let’s not forget that the Idaho Horse Board (IHB) gets $3.00 for each inspection. Funds collected are then given back to Idaho horse industry yearly in the form of grants to further interests in promotion, research, and education. Since 1989, $496,395 in grants have been awarded. If your chapter is looking for monies to further chapter education or promotion and research, make sure to complete and submit your grant application by December 1st. Details can be found at www.idahohorseboard.com. Please help to spread the word and let me know, if any questions about the proposed fee increase or how Idaho Horse Board grants can help BCHI chapters achieve education goals.

READ MORE:   2018-09-22 BOD Education Report

18. September 2018 · Comments Off on Tips from TrailMeister · Categories: Around The Campfire, Tips, Tricks and Tid Bits

Cleaning your saddle pad

Cleaning your saddle pad

Saddle pads get dirty, really dirty, really quickly.  Sweat and dirt happen when we ride and it’s up to us to stay on top of the filth lest our mounts suffer. It’s time to clean our saddle pad.

I’m not about to say that I wash my pads after every ride. What I do is let them dry between rides (I have three pads that I alternate using) and prior to the following use I gently brush them in a circlular motion, with a rubber curry to break up any dried grime and sweat chunks.

But, by the end of summer those pads have seen a lot of trail miles pass under them and it’s time for a more thorough cleaning to remove the more stubborn deposits.

My fabulous first idea was to put the pads in the washing machine. My much better half said that wasn’t going to happen and that I should find a better alternative. Being too lazy to visit the local laundry mat I opted for a fence gate and a hose.

I use Skito saddle pads that have laminated foam shims inside a fleece pocket, so my cleaning process may be slightly more involved.

1 – Remove the foam inserts and let them soak in a bucket of cool water. I don’t use any detergent because it’s next to impossible to get out. Any soap residue that remains will irritate my animals and that’s a bad thing. Scientists consider water to be the universal solvent because it’s capable of dissolving more substances than anything else (barring oils which I don’t generally find inside my saddle pad). I use this property to my benefit and simply repeatedly squeezing the foams to slowly work any accumulated salts out of material. Dump and refill the bucket with fresh water as often as you can. I’ve been known to put a small amount of vinegar in the water to help kill any lingering beasties.

2 – With the saddle pad securely supported, it’s going to be heavy, use a garden use to spray the saddle pad from the inside out. I want to force the grime out of the material not push it further into the fibers. I also try to work from the middle outward, again always trying to push the dirt away from the pad. I’ve found that once the pad is completely saturated with water that rubbing the material with my fingers is easier on the fabric and works better than brushing with curry combs. This phase takes a while and yes, you will be cold and wet, but keep up the good work until the water runs clear.

3 – Once the pads and the foams cease releasing dirt into your clean water it’s time to dry. Help the pads keep their shape by hanging them over a saddle rack, out of the sun and away from direct heat. Leaving the pad hanging over the gate will cause it to stretch and lose its contoured shape. Direct heat or sun can cause the materials to shrink. Yes, drying this way is slow and takes a while. That’s why we have spare saddle pads.

I wish that I could say that these three steps to a clean saddle pad are a great secret that I discovered. Unfortunately, equipment cleaning is just another part of riding horses and mules. What I have discovered is that by ensuring that when this vital piece of equine tack stays in good working condition it makes for a better ride by continuing to provide the support, protection, and comfort that my animals deserve.

How often do you clean your saddle pads?

For more TrailMeister trail riding tips and thoughts visit www.TrailMeister.com

Keeping Paradise Possible

Keeping Paradise Possible – By Robert Eversole – North East Chapter, BCHW

Paradise. For some that’s an image of a tropical beach, for me it’s a dirt trail that twists and meanders to a backcountry camp deep in the wilderness. It’s a quiet solitude punctuated by the peaceful clip clop of hooves and the far scream of an eagle aloft. It’s the sweet perfume of pine on a warm summer day. It’s the
companionship of a trusted horse who will faithfully take you home.

Unfortunately, in a growing number of cases paradise has padlocks.

In only a few short generations we’ve “improved” a lot of backcountry and rural areas into suburbia and shopping malls. Trail Closed signs are both dreaded and unfortunately frequently encountered. Least we lose them, we’d better take care of the equine friendly country that remains.  Paradise needs protecting.

You don’t have to be a trail rider, or even have your own horse, to recognize the importance of conserving horse trails. There are many things that each of us can do to preserve equine trails. Unfortunately, often it’s sometimes hard to explain why groups like ours are important. Here are some of the reasons to join that I talk about during my expo clinics.

Horse clubs are focal points for both social events and trail stewardship efforts. For me the biggest reason to join an equestrian club is for the comradery of people who have the same interests. Being able to talk about trail conditions, feed, training, etc. is priceless.

Don’t have a local Back Country Horsemen group nearby, or don’t care for the one that is? Start a new one. These organizations are always looking for new members and new chapters. A quick google search will put you in touch with someone who can help.

Here are four reasons to join a, or start, a horse club. And quotes from those who have.

  • You’ll meet like-minded people and make new friends

“Share activities with like-minded people both socially and out on the trails.”

“The diversity of a club’s membership allows members to ride and camp with others who have similar aspirations and at a whole range of experiences. It makes it easy to find people to ride with when their regular partner is unable to get away.”

“There’s a large group of us who don’t just go out on club rides, we’ll meet up on other weekends too – it’s great to have lots of different people to go riding with.”

“Looking for love?  I know lots of couples who met through horses!”

  • You’ll see new places and do new things

“You can expand the scope of your own activities by taking part in those organized by more experienced members”

“A lot of clubs have a range of social events which complements the riding scene”

“If you want to go to a new trail area there’s bound to be someone in the club who has already been and willing to give you info on the place”

  • You’ll learn new skills

“Many clubs offer training opportunities, however chaotic or informal, and there are always more experienced members around to provide guidance and help.”

“Practical peer-to-peer coaching so that we all learn together”

“Knowledge transfer from more experienced members, a bit like an apprenticeship”

“As a new member I doubt that I’d have made the steps to ride outside the arena without the support of the club”

  • It’s fun!

“It’s more fun spending your day out with others.  And they can get great photos of you and your partner on rides too.”

There are more benefits than just being a member of a club. There are new friends to be made, information to learn and most of all the comradery of people who get what it means to love horses and trail riding.

We live during a time when equine trail use is being curtailed. Most Americans live in urban settings, removed from our version of paradise. Most of them don’t understand the importance of conservation, outdoor recreation, and the protection of trails.

Please, don’t wait until you’re faced with a crisis before you get involved. Volunteer with trail projects, join a club that will help protect your trail access, and educate yourself and others on best practices.

07. September 2018 · Comments Off on Robbin Schindele Update – Fall 2018 · Categories: Current Events, Member Profiles

 

Here’s the website for my project; http://www.craterlakewild.org

And for my employers: http://www.umpquawatersheds.org . I work 25 hours a week for pitiful wages but I believe in the mission.

On the 22nd I will become a Board Member for another conservation org. The Friends of Crater Lake: http://www.friendsofcraterlake.org/  Promoting conservation issues here in “the timber capital of America” is a tough sell but I’m chipping away at it.

Robbin Schindele
High Haven House
PO Box 342
Glide, OR 97443
208-365-1789