Yellow Jacket trail head is south east of Cascade, Idaho. You get there by taking the warm lake road to the west side of the lake and driving south for seven miles on a series of gravel forest service roads. It is a popular area with a number of camping locations, interesting trails and good fishing.  Video    See More Pictures The camp site we used is on the South Fork of the Salmon river and is large enough that multiple groups can use it. There is good access to water for the stock and trees for high-lines.  There is plenty of room for a number of trailers.Ten members of Squaw Butte signed up for this event, Janelle & Troy Weeks, Kelly Ragland, Shelly Duff, David Benson, Charles & Lorraine Chick, Fanny Berki, Shannon Schantz, Nancy Smith
and Rob Adams. Joining us were three members of the Boise National Forest northern trail crew, Hailey Brookins, Tom Shearer and Anthony Snelling. With this large number of people and stock we broke up into three different trail teams. Some explored the trail and roads available from this trail head, while the trail crew tackled the Yellow Jacket trail. This area has experienced multiple fires and has sections with many dead trees that gravity had not toppled yet. This last winter, many of those trees came down.
 
The team encountered down trees the moment they crossed the river and that continued for the three miles of trail that they completed of this seven mile trail on Saturday. We ran out of time and energy, not trees. We cleared around 50 major trees with chainsaws and a lot of brush and smaller ones with hand saws. It is likely there are 50 more in the remaining four miles.

One tree fell dead center on a bridge, it did no damage, but required a number of careful cuts to remove it.


By 16:30 all but the fisherman had returned to the trail head. We were tired, but all had enjoyed their day in this scenic area of the Boise Nation forest. A shady spot was found, cold beer or other beverages were opened and stories of the day swapped. One group had found a large still standing tree that some fool had tried to cut down, but got scared and stopped before he made the final fall cut. The result was a very dangerous tree ready to fall down over the road. They reported it to a fire ranger who was looking to see if any of the lighting strikes from the Friday night thunder storm had started any fires. That tree will be removed first thing this week, likely by blasting. Dinner was excellent and the talk around the camp fire lasted until the last of the alpine glow left the mountains.

14. June 2018 · Comments Off on National Trails Day Results · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

12. June 2018 · Comments Off on COALITION FOR PUBLIC LAND · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands


THE COALITION FOR PUBLIC LAND
Keep It Public is a 501c3 non-profit organization run exclusively by volunteers. When you give to KIP, you help:

1. Build educational content about the American public land system
2. Direct hands-on conservation to assist our land management agencies
3. Provide a voice for sensible policy via direct advocacy

Whether it’s from a historical, constitutional, or economic vantage point, public lands are a national treasure. Given the amount of discord present in our society, we feel an obligation to demonstrate that individuals from a variety of backgrounds – be they recreational, industrial, or political – can come together over the unique and wonderful lands that belong to us all.

Join us in a united stance on behalf of federal public lands. #keepitpublic             https://keepitpublic.org/

11. June 2018 · Comments Off on BCHA Website – New stuff · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

https://www.bcha.org/

10. June 2018 · Comments Off on Oregon’s Owyhee Canyonlands · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands


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09. June 2018 · Comments Off on Western Trail Rider – Blog · Categories: Around The Campfire


ABOUT WESTERN TRAIL RIDER
February 2016:

During the summer of 2012, I got together with an old friend I hadn’t seen in a while. As we sat and talked, he mentioned that one day he’d like to ride from Mexico to Canada on the Great Western Trail (GWT). That conversation planted a seed in the back of my mind (very fertile ground, due to a lot of dead and composted ideas back there), which took root and started to grow. I spoke with him several weeks later and together we decided we would give it a shot. As I started looking for information on the GWT, I was surprised at how little there really was. Apparently nobody had made the full trip in one shot before, at least not that I found documented. There were only wildly divergent estimates on the mileage, ranging from 3,000 to 4,500 miles, despite the fact that it’s only about 1,500 miles by roads (Google Maps), so estimating travel time is pretty much a wild guess. In fact, on the GWT website, I was the only registrant on the equine forum, so they made me an administrator. Read More

More Pictures           Lou Ann’s Directions
June 2, 2018 was National Trails Day and Squaw Butte likes to make this project weekend fun for it’s members and to put our organization in front of the public. The Peace Creek trail head fits both of those requirements.  Working with Charlie Jarvis, the Boise National Forest trails supervisor, we got the camping site reserved for our team and planned a full day of trail clearing and sawyer education.

Thirteen members and seventeen stock meet at the trail head camp, most arriving on Friday night. Camp was set up and stock feed and then an ad-hock dinner was prepared and shared. Even with a nice camp fire, when the sun went down around 21:30 the air turned cold and all wandered off to their warm sleeping bags.  Morning came about 06:30 when the first of us got up and the stock noticed.  Soon they were all asking to be feed and by 07:00 coffee was being sipped around the fire.  Lisa had pre-made breakfast sandwiches which Bill warmed in the oven of his camper.  By 08:30 we were saddling up and when Charlie Jarvis arrived ready for our project safety meeting.


With 13 members plus Charlie and multiple packing stock, we broke up into two teams, one would work the main Peace Creek trail with Charlie and a second would work the lower valley trail that connected to the Devil’s slide trail.

Peace creek trail (blue) Devil’s Slide Trail (red)

Rob, Shelly, Lou Ann, Nancy and Shannon worked the lower trail, while Chick & Lorraine, David, Lisa, Phil, Charlie, Fanny and Jon worked the main trail.  Bill stayed in camp, fished and got some fire wood for our evening fire.

On Rob’s crew, Shelly did all the work while Rob took the role of limb swapper and sounding board as Shelly worked out her plan to tackle each down tree we encountered. Lou Ann helped with limbs and took all the pictures.  Nancy and Shannon arrived late and had a nice ride on the trail we had just cleared.

This tree had a complex bind and was stressed like a big spring, Shelly had to determine how to safely release the tension and then she could cut it up and remove it from the trail.
After 20 trees were removed and six miles of trail cleared, it was time to head back to the trailer for happy hour and munchies. The other team had arrived back just before us. They cleared a bit over 5.5 miles of trail, but didn’t clear as many trees, as a motorcyclist had started working the trail the weekend before. Charlie had wanted to survey general trail conditions and look at a rock slide that will need major work. After a great dinner that included pork tenderloin and moose, beers were drunk and stories swapped. If you didn’t cook, you helped with the dishes.

By 21:30 most of us had wandered off to our sleeping bags for a great nights sleep. Sunday dawned clear and not as cold, a great breakfast of onions, moose, eggs and potatoes, with home-made bread and hot coffee. Some headed for home and some of us took a fun ride before heading for our respective barns. This was a very successful project weekend and all who attended had a great time.