17. January 2020 · Comments Off on BCHA Looks Back on a Successful 2019 · Categories: Around The Campfire, BCHI /BCHA

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17. January 2020 · Comments Off on Speak Up for Salmon · Categories: Current Events

If you’ve been looking for an opportunity to speak up for salmon, steelhead, and Idaho’s river communities, here’s an excellent opportunity!

This Friday, January 17th, the Governor’s Salmon Workgroup will hold a public comment period from 5-7pm in the Lincoln Auditorium at the State House in Boise: 700 W Jefferson St. Anyone is welcome to sit in on the meeting or sign up to give public testimony, and each individual will be allotted 3 minutes. We hope to see you there!

On Saturday, the group will meet at the University of Idaho Boise Water Center to conduct a group meeting amongst Workgroup members. The public is also invited to sit in on this meeting.

As a reminder, IWF is a member of the Workgroup and sits alongside a diverse group of stakeholders that represent varying interests throughout Idaho and the region.

You can find the full meeting agenda for both days here.

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16. January 2020 · Comments Off on Catrock Ventures – SBFC · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

This past summer… a group of high school students traveled from the Bronx, NY (a borough of New York City) to the back country of Idaho.

Can you imagine?

They were enrolled in a program called Catrock Ventures… and worked with the SBFC to clear 5 miles of trail, experience life in the wilderness, and learn Wilderness skills.

Click here to view a short video of their amazing journey!!

Catrock Venture’s mission is to reach, inspire, and empower low-income youth to become socially responsible change-makers.

Many of these kids have never been away from their neighborhoods in the Bronx… much less the state of New York.

The opportunity to experience some of the most wild places in America is truly a life-changing experience for them.

And we support their efforts…

We need our youth… all of them… to become stewards of our wild places. And help preserve wilderness areas for everyone to enjoy today… and far into the future.

I hope you enjoy the video.

All the best,  Sally   Selwaybitterroot.org

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15. January 2020 · Comments Off on The Crosscut Saw Filer – Videos · Categories: Education

Watch all 5 Videos

This is Part 1 of 5 of the Crosscut Saw Filer. Warren Miller, author of the Crosscut Saw Manual, learned to file crosscut saws from Martin Winters, accomplished filer from the days when the crosscut saw reigned. Warren began filing saws in the 1970s and continues to pass on his knowledge at saw filing workshops today. USDA Forest Service, Missoula Technology and Development Center, 1123-2D03-MTDC.

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14. January 2020 · Comments Off on Wilderness Connect For Practitioners · Categories: Education, Public Lands

Traditional Tools & Skills

Information provided in this toolbox is intended to support the use of Traditional Tools and Skills for administrative activities in wilderness. A process for determining the minimum requirement and minimum tool is described and information and training resources are provided. The toolbox features sections on common traditional tools (i.e. saws, axes, rigging, grip hoists, rock tools, etc.), travel methods (i.e. livestock, watercraft, sled dogs, etc.), and project examples (i.e. trails, weeds, etc.). To suggest new materials for inclusion, email Lisa Ronald at lisa@wilderness.net. Date of last update: 11/26/2018.

Introduction

Overview

The use of traditional tools and skills (TTS) for necessary administrative activities in wilderness is a basic principle of wilderness stewardship. The basis for this principle is found in the Wilderness Act itself and implemented through agency regulations and policy. The use of TTS or non-motorized tools and methods is directly related to both the purpose and the definition of wilderness as described in the Wilderness Act and agency policy.

Information provided in this toolbox is intended to support the use of TTS for administrative activities in wilderness. The use of TTS is mandated by both the Wilderness Act and agency policy and exceptions are made only when the use of motorized equipment or other prohibited uses are screened through narrow criteria. Comfort, convenience, economic efficiency, and commercial value are not standards of management in wilderness or criteria that are used to screen proposals to use something other than TTS. Assumptions about the use of TTS are often not true and can be overcome. Additional information and a process for making decisions related to use of TTS skills is contained in the Minimum Requirements Decision Guide.

Training and Information Contacts

  • FS Regional Trainers and Information Contacts
  • Ninemile Wildlands Training Center
  • Missoula Technology Development Center Publications
  • Student Conservation Association Traditional Skills Training
  • Lightly on the Land-SCA Trails Manual
  • Volunteer and Partner Training sources
  • FS Regional Blasters Contact List
  • BWCAW Trail and Campsite Maintenance Guide
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14. January 2020 · Comments Off on Wild Spotter – Mapping Invasive Species · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands


You can help fight back against invasive species in America’s wild places by downloading the FREE Wild Spotter Mobile App on your smartphone or other mobile device. You’ll learn how to identify, map, and prevent the spread of these invaders in order to protect our rivers, mountains, forests, and all wild places for future generations. Learn more by watching the Wild Spotter Introduction Video.

Volunteers are a vital part of the Wild Spotter campaign! To become a volunteer, register either online or download the FREE Wild Spotter Mobile App on your smartphone or other mobile device. Once registered, reach out to your nearest National Forest or Grassland to discover how you can volunteer to help support and protect these beautiful places from invasive species. Then, just get outside and enjoy America’s wild places while keeping an eye out for those harmful invaders!  https://wildspotter.org/

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13. January 2020 · Comments Off on BCHI – Chapter Membership Training · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

PDF of Training

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13. January 2020 · Comments Off on Wyoming – Bridger Wilderness · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

About the Bridger Wilderness

The 428,169-acre Bridger Wilderness is located along the Continental Divide on the west slope of the Wind River Range in Wyoming. It was designated a Primitive Area under Department of Agriculture Regulations in 1931, and later made part of the National Wilderness Preservation System with passage of the Wilderness Act in 1964. In 1984, its original 392,169 acres were increased by 36,000 acres when the Wyoming Wilderness Act was signed into law. The Bridger Wilderness is administered by the Pinedale Ranger District of the Bridger-Teton National Forest.
Topography
The intricately faulted Wind River Range is dominated by an igneous and metamorphic core. Enormous compressional forces in the earth thrust the block of granite into the air. The glaciation and erosion that followed carved the range, leaving 13,804 foot Gannet Peak the highest mountain in the Wilderness and in Wyoming.

Glacial action left cirques, kettles, U-shaped valleys, hanging troughs, 1,300 lakes, and left “erratics”, boulders strewn about the lowlands. The sedimentary rocks that once overlay the granitic core of the range have been stripped from the mountains by erosion. Remnants of the sedimentary rocks remain near Green River Lakes.

The Wind River Mountain Range has seven of the ten largest glaciers remaining in the contiguous United States. The Green River originates in the Bridger Wilderness. The Green River joins the Colorado after 1,500 miles and empties into the Gulf of California. The Green River drains most of the west side of the Wind River Range. The Sweetwater River drains the southern end of the range and flows into the Platte River and ultimately the Gulf of Mexico.

Access
US Highway 191, the major highway between Rock Springs and Jackson, Wyoming, lies west of the Wind River Range. Trailheads are reached via roads which are clearly signed at intersections with Highway 191. Both Jackson and Rock Springs have commercial air and bus lines. Pinedale has a paved, non-commercial public airstrip located about 6 miles south of town. Shuttle services between Jackson and Rock Springs, and trailheads, are available from local private businesses.

Trails
There are over 600 miles of trails in the Bridger Wilderness. Most well-used trails are cleared early in the season, but fallen trees may be encountered on secondary trails. Winter snows generally do not leave the high passes and highest trails until mid-July. Stream flows are high and swift during snowmelt runoff in June and July, and some stream crossings can be hazardous. Check at the Pinedale Ranger Station Office, or call them at 307-367-4326, before beginning your Wilderness trip. Books with detailed trail descriptions are available at local sporting good stores and bookstores. MAP
bridger_wilderness_recreational_livestock_application

bridger_wilderness_cover_letter_for_group_permits

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09. January 2020 · Comments Off on 25 year old Cottonwood tree – Removal · Categories: Around The Campfire

Over the summer a 25 year old cotton wood that I planted when we first bought our place in Sweet was looking very poorly, more dead than alive branches. In the fall after the leaves were gone, I gave it a very close look and made arrangements for an arborist to take a look and give me an estimate to remove it that was the right course of action.  Sean McInerney of Boise Tree Service came out in November and agreed that the tree needed to come down before a good wind brought it down.  We sent an appointment for after the holidays and on January 6, 2020 his crew arrived to perform the work.

The tree was ringed by other smaller trees that I wanted to keep and would need to come down in pieces in a controlled fashion. I was interest to see if they would bring a cherry picker or climb.  When they were through, the only thing left was some saw dust, the stump was gone, the branches ground up, the larger pieces load in a trailer. I was very impressed with their sawyer skills and professionalism.

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07. January 2020 · Comments Off on National Crosscut & Chainsaw Program – New Website Active · Categories: Education, Public Lands

Happy New Year! Wanted to make sure you were aware the Forest Service’s National Crosscut and Chainsaw Program webpage is live.  It should hopefully provide a site for you to get all the FS saw information consolidated such as FS Saw Policy, PPE requirements, complexity charts, and the 5 step cutting process.  The new curriculum will be posted here once it becomes finalized.  I look forward to a great 2020 season and hope to see you all at some point this year.  Thanks and please let me know if you have any questions.  Brian Burbridge, Region 4 Saw Program Manager brian.burbridge@usda.gov

Please share widely. If you have comments on the page, please send them to National Saw Program Manager Pete Duncan at pete.duncan@usda.gov

https://www.fs.usda.gov/managing-land/trails/trail-management-tools/national-saw-program

National Saw Program Technical Advisory Group (SPTAG)

The SPTAG is made up of national and regional saw program managers as well as other subject matter experts who provide guidance for consistent implementation of the National Saw Program.

National and regional saw program managers contact information…

Sawyer Training

New crosscut and chainsaw training modules will be available soon. The module-based training focuses on “Developing a Thinking Sawyer” and emphasizes risk management, human factors, and sawyer safety. Forest Service sawyers can still attend approved training courses until the new program is finalized.

Contact your local unit saw program for training opportunities. National and regional training workshop announcements will be added to this page. Check back for updates!

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Wearing the proper PPE is critical when operating a chainsaw or crosscut saw. Follow these guidelines for required PPE when using a saw…

Sawyer Certification Levels

Forest Service employees, volunteers, partners, and cooperators can obtain 4 levels of certification for chainsaw and crosscut saw operation under the new saw policy:

  1. Sawyer trainee
  2. A Sawyer
  3. B Sawyer
  4. C Sawyer

Related Reference Materials

Have a question?

Contact the Forest Service Saw Program at sm.fs.fssawprogram@usda.gov.

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06. January 2020 · Comments Off on SRA – IDPR Grants for 2021- Need support · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands, Work Parties and Projects

January 6, 2020

By Kent May – Trails Supervisor Sawtooth National Recreation Area

For 2021 RTP we are replacing two log boardwalks/puncheon, and removing two others on the Livingston Mill trail (pics attached). The two that are removed, will have the stream crossing hardened with rock to prevent erosion. On top of the infrastructure work, we will be doing 90 miles of heavy maintenance to trails in and accessing the White Clouds Wilderness.

  

Replace these

   

Remove these and harden trail

For 2021 ORMV we are building 25’ of puncheon over a perennial stream on Grand Prize motorized single track trail (pic attached). For this grant there will also be a maintenance component of 100 miles of heavy maintenance to motorized trails, paying special attention to the Grand Prize trail to prevent any motorized encroachment into the Boulder Wilderness.

We are looking for support letters for our 2021 IDPR Grants

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03. January 2020 · Comments Off on Knot of the Month – Prusik Knot · Categories: Education

By Daniel Waugh <tacpdan@gmail.com>

Trailmaster Video               REI Video                      My Best Kite Video

 

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02. January 2020 · Comments Off on Stop-The-Bleed tools for your First Aid Kit · Categories: Around The Campfire, Education

Tourniquet – Life saving equipment – hemorrhaging is the leading cause of preventable death in tactical and non-tactical trauma situations  VIDEO

  • Life saving equipment] – hemorrhaging is the leading cause of preventable death in tactical and non-tactical trauma situations 
  • Patent pending finger hole design for better grip in mud, blood
  • No-curl tip – for the largest patients the no-curl tip resists pealing when matters most
  • Apply a second tourniquet to stop difficult arterial bleeding
  • New gen 3 us made kevlar stitching, aluminum windlass, aggressive teeth pinch buckle prevents strap pealing


QuikClot First Aid Advanced Clotting Sponge

  • QuikClot stops bleeding 3 times faster than blood on its own
  • Tested and proven in years of combat use by the U.S. military
  • Pre-hydrated zeolite clotting agent does not contain botanicals or animal and human proteins
  • Easily conforms to wounds; simply apply the sponge to the source of the bleeding and apply pressure
  • The compact size allows you to add QuikClot to your medical supplies, glove box, or emergency kit
  • VIDEO

ZipStitch Laceration Kit – Surgical Quality Wound Closure  VIDEO

  • WHEN YOU CAN’T STITCH IT, ZIP IT! This product contains the following: 1 ZipStitch device to close minor lacerations up to 1.5”, 1 alcohol wipe to clean the wound area, 1 gauze pad to help control bleeding and 1 bandage to cover and protect the closed wound, supplies for one wound. ZIPSTITCH is only 1.5″ so bring it along for that extra peace of mind in any situation where cuts may occur.
  • IT’S EASY TO USE AND EFFECTIVE: The intuitive Zip closure allows you to close minor lacerations in seconds with no pain or puncturing of the skin and is proven to be 8X stronger and leave less scarring than stitches, specially-designed adhesive lasts for up to 7 days

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01. January 2020 · Comments Off on Happy New Year – BCHA · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

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31. December 2019 · Comments Off on BCHI State Board Meeting & Convention · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Current Events

Treasure Valley Chapter – Facebook Page

Information PDF

New Year Greetings to Squaw Butte BCHI Members,

The 2020 BOD Meeting and Convention information and registration form is on the BCHI website on the Activities’ page http://www.bchi.org/activities.htm. Please open it and read through it. There are substantial savings for registering early, rather than later, because we want members who have never attended to join us for the convention: $70 for person and only $120 per couple. Early registrations will be postmarked before March 1st. We are also offering substantial discounts for young attendees, whether members or not, at only $20 per ticket for the dinner/convention. And, we are selling dinner tickets for adults who wish to attend the social hour, dinner, and live auction, only, at $25.

All delegates must pay the full convention registration fee if they are voting delegates, and all BCHI members who attend the convention for the day, regardless if they vote, must pay the full–$70 single, $120 couple (early fees) or $85 per person (after Feb. 29)–registration fee.

We have placed the option of paying only $25 for dinner as a courtesy in the case someone’s travel partner or friend wants to attend dinner. A $25 dinner ticket holder will be allowed in the building at 5:00pm.
We have different fees to allow for flexibility, in the hope that more members will attend. We want all to take advantage of the savings without taking advantage of us and the costs of putting on the convention. (And, though not explained in the website info, part of the fees go to pay for Friday’s meetings.

We have placed a little information about motels and eateries on the site as well. Please note that to get a room at the Best Western Plus Peppertree across the parking lot from the Nampa Civic Center, the venue for the convention, you must click into the Best Western Motel Reservation URL, Best Western Motel Reservation URL ; scroll down to see Backcountry Horsemen discount prices. I believe that the Best Western would only reserve 20 rooms for this function, so log in early. For those who cannot use a computer, we are reserved under Backcountry Horsemen under Group ID #Z81XT6F7.

Please take the time to read through the information on the BCHI website, which may change, slightly, as we near the events. We have three great presentations on Saturday from Madison Seamons (stock care–very entertaining), Cheryl Bice (emergency care), and Alayne Blickel (managing your horse pasture/corral areas)…so get on board and get your registrations in early.

Alice Millington
Treasure Valley BCHI President
McCall, ID
millington0606@gmail.com
208-475-4107

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30. December 2019 · Comments Off on Trail Volunteer Sawyer Certification · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

Every member of a volunteer trail crew who operates a chainsaw or crosscut on public land need to complete USFS sawyer training. This is the same training that USFS seasonal employees are required to complete and is designed to keep the crews safe. In years past this training was only available directly from the USFS, but due to the 2016 Saw Policy revision FSM 2358.05 it is now possible for organizations like Back Country Horsemen members with proper training and endorsements to train Trail Volunteers.
The 2016 National Saw Policy applies to all activities on National Forest System lands (NFS) that involve the use of saws, unless a separate interagency agreement covers that activity. The Forest Service Saw Program provides direction on qualifications, training, evaluation, and certification requirements for Forest Service employees, volunteers, Training Consultants, and cooperators using saws on NFS lands.

A Sawyer. An apprentice sawyer who may saw only in the least complex situations or, for training purposes, at the next higher level and in either case only under the immediate supervision of a B or C Sawyer qualified to supervise the work.

B Sawyer ̶ Bucking Only An intermediate Sawyer who may independently buck and limb any size material in moderately complex situations within the restrictions noted on the sawyer’s National Sawyer Certification Card and who may saw at the next higher level, but only under the immediate supervision of a sawyer qualified to supervise the work.

C Sawyer ̶ Bucking Only An advanced sawyer who may independently buck and limb any size material in highly complex situations based on the Regional Saw Program Manager’s or Saw Program Coordinator’s written recommendation, which must be supported by demonstrated advanced saw knowledge and skills and, in most cases, certification as a B Sawyer (FSM 2358.1, ex. 02); who may conduct classroom and field training within their skill level for A and B Sawyers; and who may conduct field proficiency evaluations within their skill level for A Sawyers and B Sawyers ̶ Bucking Only

Back Country Horsemen of Idaho has a number of members who have completed the required training, have the experience and required endorsements and have been conducting classes working in partnership with the USFS in region 1 and 4.

Certification need to be renewed every three years, so if your certification card has expired or doesn’t look like this, you need to attend a sawyer workshop in 2020. Contact one of the Sawyer instructors listed above to learn about a training opportunity near by.

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25. December 2019 · Comments Off on Wilderness Volunteers – Blog · Categories: Public Lands

Equipment Spotlight: Adventure Medical Kits Ultralight Watertight PRO

Over the last 19 years I’ve led nearly 40 week-long service projects with Wilderness Volunteers in public lands all over the United States. I’ve used a number of different first aid kits to deal with scrapes, cuts, blisters, etc. over this time but hands down my current favorite is the Ultralight Watertight PRO from Adventure Medical Kits.
The exterior yellow rip-stop nylon zippered bag helps keep the contents dry even when working in rainy and wet conditions. The interior bags (3 Super stretch DryFlex™ bags and 1 smaller rip-stop nylon bag) make doubly sure the kit contents stay dry while still being lightweight (~⅓-½ oz), and durable. (Having opened up kits before for a bandage only to find the paper soaked I can’t say how much I appreciate medical kits that keep the insides dry even when your backpack gets wet.)

Keep It Clean: On The Importance of Cleaning Your Gear

One of the most important (and likely most forgotten) parts of being a responsible outdoor adventurer is cleaning your gear before and after each adventure.

While exploring our nation’s wild lands helps us gain appreciation for them it can also put them in added danger. Invasive weeds, insects, and diseases can be introduced to new areas via shoes, clothing, camping gear, boats, vehicles, firewood, etc.

INTERN BLOG SERIES: A Necessity Not My Own

BY ALIX SCHOBACK // 2019 WILDERNESS VOLUNTEERS INTERN

“So you’re paying an organization to go do manual labor for a week? Shouldn’t they be paying you?” 

The words of my grandpa, who had been fairly confused about my summer internship with Wilderness Volunteers, echoed in my head. I sat on a rock beside the trail we were working on in the Sawtooth Wilderness; we were three miles from our destination of the wilderness boundary, and 5 miles from our camp at McGown Lakes. I looked out at the mountainside across from me, littered with dead trees — some strewn across the ground, some still upright — from a ten-year-old burn. My tool of choice for the day, a grubhoe, lay at my feet. 

It was the fourth day of our project, and I had already hiked nearly forty miles. In all honesty, I was exhausted. Consequently, I was frustrated with myself. This was supposed to be what I loved, what I cared about — work I considered to be of the utmost importance. Still, for a second, my grandpa’s words resonated with me. I felt the slightest sense of injustice, then shame for allowing the emotion to even enter my head.

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22. December 2019 · Comments Off on National Wilderness Stewardship Alliance · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Education

Link to Website
For Back Country Horsemen of Oregon Demonstrations BCHA Demonstrations

Randy Rasmussen, BCHA   Partnering for Generational Stewardship of Wilderness

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17. December 2019 · Comments Off on Cleaning a Saddle with Ground in Dirt & Other Cool Stuff · Categories: Around The Campfire

Cleaning a Saddle with Ground in Dirt

Leather Mystery Braid Cuff

Eye splice in double braid polyester rope

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16. December 2019 · Comments Off on BCHA – Video · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

2019 is coming to a close. Thank you for your membership and dedication to BCHA.
We understand this is a busy time of year. You can exponentially impact our efforts by fundraising on behalf of BCHA. Create a Facebook fundraiser, refer a friend, gift a membership; becoming a fundraiser ensures we can continue reaching oth
ers and enabling great work like this to continue.

Thank you for believing in our mission and supporting our efforts of keeping trails open for you.

Check out the BCH Work Party Video from Umatilla, WA

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13. December 2019 · Comments Off on 2019 ITA Wrap-Up · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

Click on each section to read the complete story

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13. December 2019 · Comments Off on Idaho Rangeland Resources Commission · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

Idaho Rangeland Resources Commission 
2019-IRRC-Annual-Report

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13. December 2019 · Comments Off on SBFC Fall Newsletter 2019 · Categories: Education, Public Lands

Click to View Newsletter Link to Website

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12. December 2019 · Comments Off on Life Flight (Saint Al’s & Saint Luke’s) <> All BCHI members should belong to one of the organizations! · Categories: Around The Campfire

https://www.stlukesonline.org/health-services/specialties/programs/air-st-lukes-membership

Air Reciprocal Programs

As of April 1st, 2018

Whether in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Wyoming, western Montana, northern Nevada, or northern California, you may be covered if transported by a reciprocal partner, subject to the reciprocating program’s membership rules. Life Flight Network’s reciprocal partners include:

https://www.lifeflight.org/membership/

Air St. Luke’s – Back Country Horsemen of Idaho        FAQ AIR-253 082418      Life Flight Application Form

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06. December 2019 · Comments Off on Recovering America’s Wildlife Act · Categories: Current Events

Tomorrow, the House Natural Resources Committee will vote on a piece of critically important legislation for wildlife, the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, and we need your help in asking Idaho Congressman Russ Fulcher to vote “yes”!

Idaho houses some of the most iconic wildlife in the nation including bighorn sheep, mountain goats, and anadromous salmon and steelhead. But those species, and hundreds more in Idaho, are at risk. The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act would provide $1.4 billion annually to state and tribal wildlife agencies across the nation. The money would aid local, on-the-ground work benefitting hunters and anglers and anyone who appreciates Idaho’s diverse and iconic wildlife species.

Please join us in asking Representative Fulcher to stand up for Idaho’s sportsmen and women through his support of this monumental legislation.

Follow THIS LINK to email Congressman Fulcher.

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02. December 2019 · Comments Off on Holiday Pot-Luck – December 7, 2019 · Categories: Around The Campfire

Christmas Party details 2019

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01. December 2019 · Comments Off on E-Bikes welcome on ‘motorized use’ Forest Service trails, roads · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

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24. November 2019 · Comments Off on Squaw Butte Annual Food & Funds drive for People & Pets · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

It is that holiday time of year when the generous members of Back Country Horsemen – Squaw Butte Chapter donate food, funds and pet supplies to local organization in Gem county.

Food & Funds will be collected at the December monthly chapter meeting Thursday December 5th, and at the Holiday Pot-Luck Saturday December 7th.

2019 Food-Pet Drive Information

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21. November 2019 · Comments Off on BCHA – Members Area · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

http://www.bcha.org/home-mem/
http://www.bcha.org/education/

US Forest Service Trail Fundamentals

As a BCHA member who communicates to the Forest Service on public trail issues should be familiar with the trail fundamentals that include five key concepts that are cornerstones of Forest Service trail maintenance and management, Trail Type, Trail Class, Managed Use, Designed Use, and Trail Design Parameters.

The US Forest Service provides a website with training material and documents on Trail Classification, or as it is referred to on the site is Trail Fundamentals.

This training was given to BCH members at a previous national convention, it is available for download.

Introduction to Trail Classifications, Download – PDF, and PDF1
Part 1 –Why we need to be Concerned, Download – PDF, or PPT Presentation
Part 2 – Understanding Trail Fundamentals, Download – PDF, or PPT Presentation
Part 3 – Approaches for Obtaining and Validating Data, Download – PDF, or PPT Presentation
Part 4 – Example Responses, Download – PDF, or PPT Presentation
Planning Process, Download – PPT Presentation

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20. November 2019 · Comments Off on Life Flight Network – Fall 2019 · Categories: Around The Campfire


You are receiving this newsletter because you have an active Membership or have purchased a gift membership with Life Flight Network.

We know there are many reasons why you have purchased a membership and we thank you for this support. Membership not only protects you and your family members from ANY out-of-pocket expenses when transported by Life Flight Network or a reciprocal partner, it also contributes to the transport costs for patients for whom we receive little or no reimbursement. Your membership fees also support emergency medical services in your community. For instance, last year Life Flight Network provided over 300 education and safety trainings across the Northwest and Intermountain West for EMS, law enforcement, ski patrol, etc., and all was done free of charge. We want to ensure in your time of need, our EMS partners and Life Flight Network are coordinated. Together we are providing the timely and world-class care you deserve.

Are you ready for winter? Whether it’s time to stay in where it’s warm or get out in the great outdoors for some adventure, your decision to remain a member with Life Flight Network is a good one. We have you covered. Throughout 2019 we have continued to focus on the highest levels of Customer Service, Patient Care and Safety.
Life flight 2019 Fall Newsletter

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17. November 2019 · Comments Off on BCHA – Trails Day Fund Raiser · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

This is a reminder that Giving TrailsDay is 12/3/19. Our goal is $5,000. Two very generous donors are matching your donation up to a combined $1,500! But why stop there? Facebook will also match up to $7 million, on a first come first serve basis, so you must make your donation on our BCHA Facebook page at 8:00 a.m. ET, 5:00 a.m. PT on 12/3/19. 100% of your donation comes to BCHA when donated through Facebook and supports our work of keeping trails open for you! Click the above dates to easily add this important date to your calendar.

And watch this fun video of the amazing work we’re doing sent in by Danny Riddle, High Desert BCH, Nevada!

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1OmvrZS20V5gKgjD_evXbJJaIYk3GQXH7/view?usp=sharing

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11. November 2019 · Comments Off on First Idaho Trail Ride · Categories: Fun Rides


Heather Donesky
Sunday, November 10, 2019

Rob, thanks so much for being the fearless leader on our ride in the Wilson Creek area of the Owyhee’s and for bringing a horse for Elena. She had a great time and she looked pretty comfortable most of the time. Her experience out on trails is very limited. I’ve really lucked out with Natasja. She is bold, curious and unafraid of work, so she pitches in and helps me, making these adventures easier. Plus she rides very well.
Again, thanks.
Heather

Natasja (Denmark) and Elena (Spain) are high school exchange students spending a year in the Emmett area. Both are amazing young woman.

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11. November 2019 · Comments Off on Back Country Goat Packing · Categories: Public Lands

Back Country Goat Packing

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11. November 2019 · Comments Off on Owyhee Canyonlands – Oregon · Categories: Public Lands

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08. November 2019 · Comments Off on BCHI Foundation – Amazon Smiles · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

AMAZONSMILE – how to sign up (BCHI Foundation)

About AmazonSmile

What is AmazonSmile?

AmazonSmile is a simple and automatic way for you to support your favorite charitable organization every time you shop, at no cost to you. When you shop at smile.amazon.com, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price to your favorite charitable organization. You can choose from over one million organizations to support.

How do I shop at AmazonSmile?

To shop at AmazonSmile simply go to smile.amazon.com from the web browser on your computer or mobile device. You may also want to add a bookmark to smile.amazon.com to make it even easier to return and start your shopping at AmazonSmile.

Which products on AmazonSmile are eligible for charitable donations?

Tens of millions of products on AmazonSmile are eligible for donations. You will see eligible products marked “Eligible for AmazonSmile donation” on their product detail pages. Recurring Subscribe-and-Save purchases and subscription renewals are not currently eligible.

Can I use my existing Amazon.com account on AmazonSmile?

Yes, you use the same account on Amazon.com and AmazonSmile. Your shopping cart, Wish List, wedding or baby registry, and other account settings are also the same.

How do I select a charitable organization to support when shopping on AmazonSmile?

On your first visit to AmazonSmile smile.amazon.com, you need to select a charitable organization to receive donations from eligible purchases before you begin shopping. We will remember your selection, and then every eligible purchase you make at smile.amazon.com will result in a donation.

Can I change my charity?

Yes, you can change your charity any time. Your AmazonSmile purchases after the change count towards your newly selected charity. To change your charity, sign in to smile.amazon.com on your desktop or mobile phone browser and simply select “Change your Charity” in “Your Account.”

What charities can I choose from?

You can choose from over one million eligible 501(c)(3) public charitable organizations.

What if my selected charity does not register to participate in the AmazonSmile program or becomes ineligible?
If your selected charity does not register to participate, becomes ineligible, or requests to be removed from the program, you will have a chance to select a different charity to receive the accrued donations that have not yet been disbursed to your charity. If you do not select a different charity, the accrued donations will be distributed to other organizations receiving donations.
If I represent a charitable organization, how can I learn more about registering my organization for AmazonSmile?

Go to org.amazon.com to learn how to register your organization to receive donations.

How much of my purchase does Amazon donate?

The AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price from your eligible AmazonSmile purchases. The purchase price is the amount paid for the item minus any rebates and excluding shipping & handling, gift-wrapping fees, taxes, or service charges. From time to time, we may offer special, limited time promotions that increase the donation amount on one or more products or services or provide for additional donations to charitable organizations. Special terms and restrictions may apply. Please see the relevant promotion for complete details.

Can I receive a tax deduction for amounts donated from my purchases on AmazonSmile?

Donations are made by the AmazonSmile Foundation and are not tax deductible by you.

How can I learn more about AmazonSmile?

Please see complete AmazonSmile program details.

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05. November 2019 · Comments Off on Boise and Payette National Forests begin Christmas tree permit · Categories: Around The Campfire, Public Lands

Boise National Forest; 1249 S. Vinnell Way, Suite 200; Boise, Idaho 83709
(208) 373-4100     https://www.fs.usda.gov/boise
Contact: Linda Steinhaus     Phone: (208) 373-4106

Boise and Payette National Forests begin Christmas tree permit sales Nov. 23

Boise, Idaho November 1, 2019 –The Boise and Payette National Forest (NF) vendors will begin selling Christmas tree permits Saturday, Nov. 23. On Monday, Nov. 25, permits will be available at Boise and Payette NF District Offices and the Interagency Visitor’s Information Center located at 1387 South Vinnell Way in Boise, 83709. All tree permits are valid to Dec. 25.

Each permit allows one tree to be cut, with a limit of three permits per family. For both Forests, the cost of a permit for one tree is $10. The maximum height of a permitted tree is 12 feet. Permits are valid on both the Payette and Boise NFs. Forest offices will provide information about where a Christmas tree may be harvested, restrictions and helpful tips. A Christmas tree permit is for personal use only and the use of permits for commercial use is prohibited. Permits are not refundable for any reason. Purchaser must be at least 18 years in age.

In coordination with the “Every Kid Outdoors” program, fourth-graders who are participating in the program can receive a free Christmas tree Permit. The U.S. Forest Service is among several federal agencies that support the Every Kid Outdoors initiative which is a nationwide call to action to build the next generation of outdoor enthusiasts. The initiative provides a free pass to all fourth-grade students by going to: https://everykidoutdoors.gov/index.htm. Complete the voucher, print it and bring it to the Forest Service office.

To receive a free Christmas tree permit, the fourth-grader and a parent must go to a Forest Service office in person with the “voucher” they received from the online website at: https://everykidoutdoors.gov/index.htm

 Commercial vendors will not be issuing a free Christmas tree permit to participants of the Every Kid Outdoors program, and free Christmas tree permits cannot be sent through the mail or electronically.

Participation in the Every Kid Outdoors program also offers benefits at National Parks and on other public lands and facilities across the United States.

“Harvesting a Christmas tree is a fun adventure and often a traditional family event,” said Ruth Rieper, Boise NF Tree Coordinator. “Please review the Christmas tree brochure and map for optimal areas.”

If an unusually heavy snowfall occurs in southwest Idaho, and forest roads become a safety concern for the public, some areas may be closed early to Christmas tree gathering. Forest roads are not plowed. Call ahead and check websites for road conditions before heading out. Please do not block private or county roadways at any time. For further information call the Boise NF at: 208-373-4007 and check out our website for updates and closures at:

https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices.

To provide for family safety, officials advise a few simple guidelines:

  • Use the brochure with instructions provided.
  • Practice winter survival and driving techniques.
  • Bring the right tools, such as a saw and a shovel, so the tree can be cut to within 6” of the ground’s surface.
  • Take along emergency equipment, plenty of food and water, and try to use a 4-wheel drive vehicle if you are planning to travel in snow country.
  • Always inform neighbors and family friends of the route you intend to take, include a map of your destination, and the time that you plan to be gone.
  • Be prepared for the possibility of a long hike or snowmobile ride while searching for the perfect tree.
  • According to Idaho state law, any vehicle carrying a load that extends more than 4 feet past the tailgate, must display a red or florescent orange flag tied on the end of the load to caution other drivers.

The Idaho City Ranger District 208-392-6681

3833 Highway 21; Idaho City, ID  Hours: M-F 8 a.m– 4:30p.m

Idaho City may or may not be open on weekends. Please call ahead.

 Lowman Ranger District 208-259-3361

7359 Highway 21;  Lowman, ID 83637

Hours: M-F 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Emmett Ranger District 208-365-7000

1857 Highway 16, Suite A;  Emmett, ID 83617

Hours: M-F 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Cascade Ranger District 208-382-7400

540 North Main Street;  Cascade, ID 83611

Hours: M-F 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

 Mountain Home Ranger District 208-587-7961

3080 Industrial Way;  Mountain Home, ID   83647

Hours: M-F 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

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02. November 2019 · Comments Off on Alert – BCHA Tahoe National Forest Lawsuit · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

As Chairman, I want to communicate directly with you about litigation that BCHA and its partners filed last week in Federal District Court in order to protect our ongoing use and enjoyment of national forest trails. BCHA rarely enters into litigation. The last time we did so was in 2006, when the US Forest Service unilaterally, and without seeking public review and comment, proposed a change in its Trail Classification Standards that would have harmed the interests of BCHA and its membership. We ended up settling that lawsuit with the agency and, remarkably, our relationship ended up stronger as a result.

Tahoe National Forest Authorization of Electric Bikes on 132 Miles of Non-Motorized Trails

On October 23rd, 2019, the Western Environmental Law Center (WELC) filed a lawsuit with the Eastern California Federal District Court on behalf of BCHA, BCH California and its Mother Lode Unit, The Wilderness Society and two local organizations over the Tahoe National Forest’s stealth authorization of electric bike (e-Bike) use on 132 miles of non-motorized trails. The authorization happened early this summer and without any opportunity for public review, comment, and environmental analyses. The text of the lawsuit can be found here. For more background on this and the broader e-Bike issue, please refer to the Public Lands Report in BCHA’s Fall 2019 newsletter.

BCHA has never been quick to support litigation. It can result in strained relationships and comes with several potential downsides, including not yielding the result we might want. But in this case, members of our co-plaintiff team were consistently rebuffed by personnel from the Tahoe National Forest when we inquired about this (unannounced) change in policy. In addition, our joint “demand letter” to the Forest Supervisor, which we submitted on September 9, 2019, went unanswered. Given the magnitude of pressure being exerted by e-Bike proponents on federal land management agencies, we felt compelled to take a stand.

Objectives of the Lawsuit

Our primary objectives for filing this lawsuit were to compel the Tahoe National Forest to rescind its approval of e-Bike use on non-motorized trails, close these trails to e-Bike use, and to cease advertising the new system of trails via the forest’s website. If the agency still felt compelled to re-designate trails for e-Bike use, we would insist on a public process where all stakeholders could review and provide formal comment. We further hope the lawsuit will act to place a “freeze” on any national forest that might be poised to authorize e-Bikes on non-motorized trails in the absence of a transparent and public process.

Next Steps

WELC has yet to be notified about which judge the District Court will assign to this case. Importantly, the filing of the lawsuit should not affect your day-to-day interactions with the US Forest Service. If anything, it might serve as a feather in our cap that demonstrates to agency personnel BCHA’s commitment to, and support of, the need for a full public process when decisions are made that affect trail classification standards and trail management objectives. I would be interested to hear from you if, however, you receive any negative feedback from Forest Service personnel regarding the lawsuit. It never hurts to better understand any criticisms leveled at BCHA and our tactics in keeping pack and saddle stock trails open and enjoyable to our membership.

Should you or your chapter receive any inquiries from the press/media about this case, please convey that BCHA’s spokesperson on this issue is Randy Rasmussen, BCHA’s Director for Public Lands & Recreation (WildernessAdvisor@bcha.org). Please refrain from providing your personal opinion to the media, as BCHA wants to ensure our public message remains consistent with that of our fellow co-plaintiffs.

Working Proactively to Address Threats to Our Mission

I hope you’ll agree that by taking this action, BCHA is being proactive on behalf of our membership in order “to perpetuate the common sense use and enjoyment of horses (and mules!) in America’s backcountry and wilderness.” I believe this is yet another valuable role that BCHA serves our 31 states and nearly 200 chapters. Moreover, BCHA’s exploration and implementation of this lawsuit was done in close coordination with, and with the unanimous support of, BCH California and its Mother Lode Unit. As Chairman, it’s another example of the incredible value that is realized when all three elements—BCHA national, BCH state, and the local BCH chapter—work in unison to advance the interests of our membership.

Respectfully,  Darrell Wallace Chairman

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27. October 2019 · Comments Off on 6 wilderness first aid training videos · Categories: Education

Wilderness Medicine | Patient Assessment

Wilderness Medicine | Focused Spine Assessment

Bleeding Control: Venous Bleeding

Bleeding Control: Arterial Bleeding

Improvised Traction Splint | Wilderness Medicine

Wilderness First Aid – Field Training

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25. October 2019 · Comments Off on BCHA Alert: Motorized Electric Bikes Off Non-motorized Trails · Categories: BCHI /BCHA, Public Lands

***************************************************************************************
Key points about electric motorized bikes

America’s backcountry should not be motorized.

E-bikes do have a place on public lands – they should be allowed in places designated for motorized vehicles.

The bicycle industry should not be dictating policy about how our public lands are managed. There is a public procedure for travel management policy on these lands.

As outdoor recreation in general becomes increasingly motorized, trails reserved for non-motorized use become even more vital to the millions who prefer travel by foot, cross country skis, horseback or traditional mountain bikes on our shared public lands.

Motorized bikes will disturb wildlife deeper into their backcountry habitat.

“Non-motorized” means no motors. So allowing any motorized vehicles onto non-motorized trails violates that principle, and it would signal the beginning of the end for non-motorized trails on our wild lands.

Any kind of electric bikes on non-motorized trails would undermine nearly a half century of policy and practices. It would be unmanageable and send federal land agencies down a slippery slope toward further motorization of our trails and backcountry.

The agencies that manage our national lands do not have the resources to monitor or police e-bikes on trails.

Like many other groups that care about trails on our public lands, we strongly oppose any effort to change existing trail management rules or policies and encourage all federal land management agencies to reject any effort to open non-motorized trails to e-bikes or other motorized vehicles.
**********************************************************************************************

Subject: California Groups Sue to Keep Motorized Electric Bikes Off Non-motorized Trails in Tahoe National Forest

We’re a plaintiff here. Our statement is below, which highlights the California partners in the suit.  Press statement below, talking points attached as a heads up.  Thanks Alison Flint, Michael Carroll et al for the heavy lifting.

Michael Reinemer

Deputy Director, Communications Strategy

1615 M Street N.W. Washington DC  20036

202-429-3949 | cell 703-966-9574

The Wilderness Society The Wilderness Society Action Fund

California Groups Sue to Keep Motorized Electric Bikes Off Non-motorized Trails in Tahoe National Forest

Dramatic change in trail policy was made without public input

SACRAMENTO, October 23, 2019 – Backcountry trail and forest groups in California joined together in a suit filed today that challenges the U.S. Forest Service decision to allow motorized bikes to operate on non-motorized trails in the Tahoe National Forest.

Plaintiffs in the suit include the Gold Country Trails Council, Backcountry Horsemen of California, Back Country Horsemen of America, the Forest Issues Group and The Wilderness Society. The groups are represented by the Western Environmental Law Center.

Helen Harvey, President, Gold Country Trails Council, Nevada County 

“Allowing motorized bicycles on non-motorized trails meant for hikers, backpackers and equestrians poses risks and conflicts for the many visitors who enjoy that type of quiet recreation.  It also undermines the trail building and maintenance time and money our volunteers have contributed in the Tahoe National Forest for decades.”

The groups cite several violations of law and policy, including the Travel Management Rule, which confines motorized transportation to certain trails to prevent harm to nature and conflicts with other trail users. Also, the Forest Service did not assess the environmental impacts of its decision, as required by the National Environmental Policy Act, one of the nation’s bedrock conservation laws.

Background
The Tahoe National Forest recently permitted “Class 1” electric mountain bikes on more than 130 miles of trails that had been developed and managed for hiking and other non-motorized uses. The Tahoe already has about 2,500 miles of trails and roads available for motorized uses.

The Tahoe’s decision undermines long-standing travel management laws and policies that help ensure higher quality recreation experiences for both motorized and non-motorized users, prevent avoidable damage to water, wildlife, and other resources, and alleviate public safety concerns and conflicts between users.

Prior to opening non-motorized trails to motorized bicycle use, the Tahoe National Forest should have followed the required travel management planning procedure, which is a public process that includes analysis under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Sometimes called the Magna Carta of conservation law, NEPA requires environmental analysis and public participation in federal decisions that affect public lands.

Earlier this year hundreds of trail advocates and conservation groups sent a joint letter to federal land management officials opposing any effort to allow e-bikes on non-motorized trails. The letter noted that non-motorized trails were created to ensure that the public could find recreational trail opportunities free from the ever-growing motorization and mechanization of our public lands. Millions of public land users including hikers, backpackers, hunters, horse packers, climbers and mountain bikers value non-motorized trails for recreation.

Additional comments from plaintiffs

Randy Hackbarth, President, Back Country Horsemen of California, Mother Lode Unit
“We are disappointed that the rules for using trails in this wonderful natural area were changed behind closed doors without public participation. This is particularly disappointing for our members who are proud of the stewardship and care they bring to the non-motorized trails on public lands. “

Lloyd Erlandson, President, Backcountry Horsemen of California
“This move by the Forest Service would benefit the e-bike industry at the expense of the users that non-motorized trails are supposed to serve. The appeal of quiet recreation and the quality of wildlife habitat in California will suffer unless this decision is reversed.”

Darrell Wallace, Chairman, Back Country Horsemen of America
“This decision sets the stage for motorizing America’s backcountry, which violates the principles and partnerships that we have worked so hard to secure over many years. We believe there is a place for motorized bikes, but non-motorized trails – by definition — are not the right place.”

Susan Jane M. Brown, Staff Attorney, Western Environmental Law Center
“The Forest Service cannot simply disregard its own rules when it comes to allowing electric bikes on non-motorized trails on the Tahoe National Forest. With this lawsuit, we seek to compel the agency to follow those rules.”

Alison Flint, Director, Litigation & Agency Policy, The Wilderness Society
“The Tahoe’s decision violates decades of established laws and policies designed to ensure that decisions about where motorized recreation occurs on our shared public lands are subject to public input and environmental analysis. Motorized bicycles are not exempt from those requirements.”

Contacts:
Randy Rasmussen, Back Country Horsemen of America, WildernessAdvisor@bcha.org, 541-602-0713
Michael Reinemer, Wilderness Society, michael_reinemer@tws.org, 202-429-3949
Alison Flint, Director, Litigation & Agency Policy, The Wilderness Society, Alison_flint@tws.org, 303-802-1404
Sangye Ince-Johannsen, Western Environmental Law Center, sangyeij@westernlaw.org, 541-778-6626

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24. October 2019 · Comments Off on Vinyl Truck or Trailer Signs – Squaw Butte Logo · Categories: Around The Campfire

Squaw Butte Signs
615 S. Washington Ave
Emmett, ID 83617
208-365-2285

They have this Squaw Butte Pattern.  These are going on my Truck Doors.

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22. October 2019 · Comments Off on US Public Land Workers Getting Assaulted, Threatened on Job · Categories: Public Lands

Federal employees overseeing U.S. public lands were assaulted or threatened at least 360 times over a five-year period marked by heightened tensions with anti-government groups.

  • PUBLISHED 21 OCTOBER 2019

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Federal employees overseeing U.S. public lands were assaulted or threatened at least 360 times over a five-year period marked by heightened tensions with anti-government groups, according a Congressional watchdog agency.

The Government Accountability Office in a new report highlights anti-government tensions that at times have boiled over. That includes the six-week armed occupation of a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon in 2016, and other standoffs with armed protesters in Montana and Nevada.

The Associated Press obtained GAO’s report ahead of its scheduled release.

It cataloged incidents ranging from threatening phone calls to the stabbing of a Bureau of Land Management worker outside a federal building. Some of the assaults triggered FBI domestic terrorism investigations, although the precise number was not disclosed because it is considered sensitive information.

The report did not say whether rates of assaults and threats were increasing. But it noted a dwindling number of federal officers patrolling the nation’s vast forests, parks, wildlife refuges and other open spaces, which cover more than 670 million acres (1.1 million square miles) primarily in 12 western states.  Read More

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21. October 2019 · Comments Off on 2019 Hours & Miles – Squaw Butte Chapter · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

2019 PRESIDENT Year End Report
2019 Volunteer Miles-Hours SummarySquaw Butte Hours and Miles Summary 2019-2014

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14. October 2019 · Comments Off on Tripod Peak – Fall Ride [TR-131] south · Categories: Fun Rides

Sunday morning October 13 dawned clear but cold. There was frost on the truck windshield and a snap to the air. Looking at the peaks, a light frosting on snow was still visible from the front that had come through earlier in the week. Our last chapter ride was planned for the Tripod peak area, north west of Smith Ferry off forest road 626 with parking planned at Sage Hen meadows.Members started arriving at the meadows by 10:00 and all were saddled and ready to go by 10:30. In the shade snow lingered and the gravel road to the trail head was frozen and had hard packed snow on it that made for some slippery footing at times. Our party was eight riders and all were excited to be up in the mountains one last time with our stock. The trail bed was frozen in the shade but softer in the sun, making for some tricky footing at times, but the stock did well and we make good time up the trail. After riding for 90 minutes and gaining over a thousand foot of elevation we crested a ridge into a meadow with some logs and rock to sit on and stopped for a shack in the sun and enjoyed the views. We had traveled 3.5 of the 5.2 miles up the the fire lookout. The trail bed was getting slicker as the sun melted the snow so we choose to turn around and make our way back to the trailer. As this was the first weekend of deer season we expected that highway 55 would be heavy with south moving traffic later in the afternoon and wanted to avoid it if possible. It was a great ride and all who attended left with pink cheeks and smiles.

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07. October 2019 · Comments Off on 2020 Raffle Calendars Available · Categories: BCHI /BCHA

CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS

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03. October 2019 · Comments Off on Idaho Wildlife Federation – Public Lands Blog · Categories: Current Events, Public Lands

LINK TO BLOG

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02. October 2019 · Comments Off on Squaw Creek Trail – TR-131 North · Categories: Fun Rides, Work Parties and Projects

On Saturday September 21, 2019 Squaw Butte members Kathy Luke, Rob Adams, Lisa Griffith, Kelly Wilkerson, Ron Fergie, David Benson, Shelly Duff & Kelly Ragland meet at the camping area along Squaw Creek near the trail head for the Squaw Creek(tr-131) and Poison Creek trails (tr-134).  Some of the members had come up on Friday night others were making this project a day ride.  Squaw Creek TR is 18 miles north of Ola, ID in the West Central mountains.By 10:00 we were saddled and on the trail, it is a short ride from camp to the trail head up the access road to the TH parking area.Bill & Marybeth Conger had been up a couple weeks before so the first few miles had been cleared of downfall, but we stopped and did some brushing were the trail was becoming overgrown.

This trail is rocky with some large slabs of granite, on one we stopped for a snack.

When we reached the point where Bill & Marybeth turned around, we started encountering down fall. We also encountered a group of bow hunters with stock. They were hiding in a bush next to a small clearing and became very unhappy when we pulled up, got out the saws and when to work removing a large tree that was blocking the trail. They left to go hunt elsewhere.

By 16:00 we were back at the trailers, having removed 14 down trees and over 1/4 mile of brush. This trail need a crew to go spend a week, doing a major brushing job and some tread work. All had a great time!

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30. September 2019 · Comments Off on Free Evening Education Classes CPR & Stop the Bleed · Categories: Education

20190930CPR-Classes

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26. September 2019 · Comments Off on BCHA – Electric Bikes on Public Lands · Categories: BCHI /BCHA
Electric Bikes Coming to Trails Near You?
BCHA has been diligently working the past two months on the rapidly-evolving issue of electric bike (e-Bike) use on federal public lands. Please see our two-page fact sheet that describes what BCHA and our partners are doing to prevent e-Bikes from being universally authorized on non-motorized trails within our national parks, national forests and BLM public lands.
As always, if you have concerns regarding this issue, I encourage you to share your concerns in writing with your local land managers and/or elected officials. Given that this issue is heating up, I ask that you please copy BCHA’s Director for Public Lands & Recreation on any such correspondence. His email is: WildernessAdvisor@bcha.org
Sincerely,
Darrell Wallace, Chairman

For more information in the fact sheet click the link below:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1DnyOC4C49eZ60d1hoN4hhCktFhS8ibNLTKCPktbY6N0/edit?usp=sharing

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22. September 2019 · Comments Off on Ethical Practices for low-impact recreating · Categories: Around The Campfire, Education

Filmed in cooperation with the Bridger-Teton National Forest, this video goes over ethical practices

This video goes over ethical practices for low-impact recreating on backcountry public lands. When your enjoying your forests, remember whatever you pack in, you need to pack out. Leave nothing but your footprints. Camp at least 200 feet from lakes, rivers and streams to protect the watersheds. Try to avoid having campfires at all, but if you do have a campfire make sure you have cleared fuels down to mineral soil and when you leave, make sure it is dead out and cool to the touch. If you use rocks to make a fire ring make sure to dismantle the ring. Hang your food in bear country at 100 yards from your camp, at least 10 feet off the ground and 4 feet from any horizontal structures. Leave your forest cleaner than you found it. PLAY VIDEO

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22. September 2019 · Comments Off on Katie Wood, new Emmett District Ranger · Categories: Around The Campfire, Current Events

Boise, Idaho, September 16, 2019—The Boise National Forest welcomes Katie Wood, as the new District Ranger in Emmett.

Katie served as the Boise District, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Support Services and Operations Chief since February 2017. She has overseen a wide diversity of areas including: emergency stabilization and rehabilitation, engineering, heavy equipment, GIS, administration and noxious and invasive weeds.

“I look forward to working in cooperation with the public while serving in this role. My goal is to ensure the Emmett Ranger District is managed in a way that takes into account the needs of current users without losing sight that future generations will need, and rely on, public lands as much as we do. This is particularly relevant given the Emmett Ranger District’s proximity to Idaho’s largest population center and the mixed uses which occur on this land.” Said Katie Wood, Emmett District Ranger.

Her tenure as Challis-Yankee Fork District Ranger (Salmon-Challis National Forest) provided her critical experience in managing challenging natural resource issues including: threatened and endangered species, forest and rangeland management, restoration, recreation, and special uses.

Katie has completed a variety of details over the past 10 years including Assistant Field Manager, Planning and Environmental Coordinator, Forest Headwaters Reserve Manager, and Disaster Program Specialist for the United States Forest Service in Washington D.C.

Emmett District Ranger      Katherine.wood@usda.gov      208-365-7000

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